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Netflix to Nix Nearly 1800 Titles - Page 5

post #121 of 132
If you can't see the PQ improvement of blu-ray over DVD then I would say that you should be more than happ with streaming PQ, it is already better than DVD.
post #122 of 132
I'm going to agree with dj4monie. I've lurked for years, but usually only spend time here when researching a problem. However, it sounds like I've done about the same things as dj4monie has; I use XBMC to stream from various online sources and have ripped physical media to my NAS which has a built-in media server.

If you don't have a NAS yet, Zyxel has a nice little 2 bay device that will hold 2 2TB SATA drives. The NAS you can find on sale for as little as $50 at times, but is usually easy to find around $80. I have one for music and another more expensive one that supports 2 3TB drives for video rips. I pick up SATA drives whenever they are on sale and use them in a SATA dock to "back up" my NAS copies and pack away the physical BD or DVD, or in some cases, I donate them to the library.

As for quality, I usually watch video on my 60" LED connected to my Yamaha 7.1 surround receiver. I have an LG BD/HD-DVD reader that I use for ripping because, as others have said, just being BD doesn't mean a good copy. My HD-DVD Terminator is a way better transfer than the BD was.

I doubt I'll totally drop my Uverse anytime soon, but I find I usually only watch a news show and everything else I either record to watch later or stream.

Great thread, sorry if I stepped on any toes, but then I'm not on here often enough for flames to bother me. ;D

Cheers.
post #123 of 132
I love not being "in" or "edgy". I read the list and will miss nothing. I purchase only BD movies I intend to watch over and over, and those I purchase used at Amazon Marketplace. I don't think I've ever spent more than $10 on a movie. I stream from Amazon or Netfix with a very low bar and that's fine. If I want better quality I'll rent from a video store or Redbox. I kind of like that Netflix frees up space for different viewing tastes. I watch most of my stuff from a treadmill and save the much anticipated stuff for the theater. I've never thought Netflix streaming services had great content but it is convenient. If I didn't get free 2day shipping I'd drop Amazon Prime in a heartbeat. Their streaming service charges for stuff that's free on Netflix.
post #124 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by IfixitBIG View Post

This is the #1 thing about streaming that could doom it: Fragmentation. The studios starting their own streaming companies, or making exclusive deals to certain companies could cause a big change in streaming. Those film companies are now seeing movies paying off down the road and they will not stop at squeezing every dime out of those movies. Paying Netflix $8 a month is one thing. But when you get to paying Netflix, then Amazon $79/year, then Warner $10/month, then Paramount $7/per month, and Disney $12/per month... I think that will turn people off.

Good points. Fragmentation will make streaming the content each of us wants more challenging, but I don't think it will doom streaming altogether. In fact the trend is opposite: MORE content is being streamed over time for lots of reasons including improved bandwidth into homes. Doomed? Nope. Hindered? Yes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by macks View Post

Netflix killed Kenny?

LOL!

My oldest daughter is a South Park junkie... she will be upset, but good to know we can just go to the southpark site and still get the content.

Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

Yet that's exactly what Netflix says it's going to do within two years.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1463651/netflix-plans-to-stream-4k-within-two-years

I think Netflix is blowing smoke. JMO.

~~~
post #125 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by All4fun View Post

Good points. Fragmentation will make streaming the content each of us wants more challenging, but I don't think it will doom streaming altogether. In fact the trend is opposite: MORE content is being streamed over time for lots of reasons including improved bandwidth into homes. Doomed? Nope. Hindered? Yes.
The problem becomes when you have to pay $8 a month for Netflix, then $5 a month to Hulu, roughly $6 a month for Amazon Prime along with however much a month for the various studios to have their own content they don't offer to anyone else, you start to errode the content when people simply don't want to pay for all those services.

A lot of streaming customers do so because it's cheap. They aren't going to want to lay out for a bunch of extra little payments to get everything they get for one single one right now.
post #126 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by knapp0564 View Post

I have always considered streaming as secondary to DVDs. There's no way the titles I want to see are going to be streamed.

I have to admit, my sister uses Netflix more than I ever have. This is because she often has friends over, and they (like her) are usually just interested in having something -- anything -- to watch while they hang out and enjoy each other's company. I, on the other hand, am more like you: that is, I usually have a specific film or TV show I want to watch when I plop down on the couch, and even when I don't have something in mind I am typically pretty picky. My friends are the same way, for the most part; when we get together for a movie, we usually plan ahead and have a specific title in mind to watch. Just different strokes, I guess...

Quote:
Originally Posted by vabchguy View Post

My HD-DVD Terminator is a way better transfer than the BD was.

A little off topic, but is this referring to the original Blu-ray release of "The Terminator", or the new, remastered version released his past February?
post #127 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by knapp0564 View Post

I have always considered streaming as secondary to DVDs. There's no way the titles I want to see are going to be streamed. Streaming appeals to the masses and must do so. The quality is inferior and I don't get the extras that I may want to see. Forget about 4K streaming it's not going to happen, for a lot of reasons. Actually a DVD created from a 4K master looks incredible on my 72" display. And I'm not talking about BluRay, but a Standard DVD. BlueRay and eventually 4K discs are and will be just more marketing ploys to squeeze more money out of the consumer. They are not necessary for home viewing. IMO. Perhaps for super sized home theater, but not for the average home theater.

So, streaming is an added value to my DVD service.

I can't believe this hasn't gotten more responses here. This is AVS Forum, so I doubt very many people here agree with you that BR and 4K are snake oil. Although PQ on BR is not a very noticeable difference to me on my old 42" 720p display, the uncompressed mastered audio track is leaps and bounds better than DVD and especially streaming. I have a modest audio setup compared to a lot of people around here, but I can still clearly hear the difference.

Also, to those who say 4K streaming will never happen I really, really, reeeeally want to know why you think that way. If the past (and Moore's law) has taught us anything it's that tech will continue to progress at an alarming pace, and we will find ourselves using bandwidth/speeds we never thought we would have or need. Right now it is impractical, but so was streaming SD video back when everyone was on 56K dial-up connections. People in this thread have been talking about streaming over 4G to their cell phones... that would have been ludacris on 1G or 2G connections, but we have found ways to increase data throughput. Wait a decade and see if 4K panels and ~1Gbps connections aren't commonplace in the US.



To the argument that the added costs of Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon VOD etc. is making streaming too expensive to replace cable, I think we need to compare it to the alternative. Cable and satalite providers have different tiers to have access to different channels. You don't get HBO paying $15/mo for the basic package. At least with different streaming companies you have a more a la carte option to pay for only what you want. Similar to cable you don't "own" the shows you're paying for. Once they stop broadcasting you lose access to them. At least with streaming services you get on-demand access and don't have to tune in at 8 PM every week to catch your show.

I think Netflix original content like the new season of Arrested Development is where TV programming is going, and I applaud them for being forward thinkers.
post #128 of 132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by knapp0564 View Post

I have always considered streaming as secondary to DVDs. There's no way the titles I want to see are going to be streamed. Streaming appeals to the masses and must do so. The quality is inferior and I don't get the extras that I may want to see. Forget about 4K streaming it's not going to happen, for a lot of reasons. Actually a DVD created from a 4K master looks incredible on my 72" display. And I'm not talking about BluRay, but a Standard DVD. BlueRay and eventually 4K discs are and will be just more marketing ploys to squeeze more money out of the consumer. They are not necessary for home viewing. IMO. Perhaps for super sized home theater, but not for the average home theater.

So, streaming is an added value to my DVD service.

 

There is an enormous supply of screenshot comparisons that demonstrate otherwise. Blu-ray does come remarkably close to 2K scans, which are the standard for digital projection. DVD does not. It is a testament to the quality of your gear that a DVD does look as good as it does. There is even something to be said about DVD and preservation of film grain, as compared to most online delivery options, but with modern high-resolution movies online delivery in 1080p absolutely beats DVD in terms of quality, by a very significant margin.
 
There's nothing wrong with being completely contented with DVD, but know this: you are seeing less than a quarter of the detail contained in a film, as compared to a Blu-ray. With with Blu-ray you are often seeing between 80% and 95% of the quality of a theatrical presentation.
 
It's a bit nostalgic to see somebody make this argument, since it is more fashionable these days to argue that 2160p/UHD resolution is not discernible from Blu-ray and 1080p.

Edited by imagic - 5/14/13 at 12:38pm
post #129 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by CleanSanchez View Post

I think Netflix original content like the new season of Arrested Development is where TV programming is going, and I applaud them for being forward thinkers.

Right on. Look at how well 'House of Cards' did on Netflix. I recall reading that it was the most watched content on Netflix, which is really saying something.

I think everyone learned from that exercise and even Hulu is cranking out examples of 'original series' (some of which I suspect to be licensed shows that didn't make it to broadcast TV here or in the UK). I am hopeful that we are seeing the beginning of a renaissance in original programming, along the lines of what HBO did a decade+ ago with best in class shows like 'The Wire' and 'The Sopranos'.
post #130 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by knapp0564 View Post

Forget about 4K streaming it's not going to happen, for a lot of reasons.

rolleyes.gif


Really? What specific reasons? As posted earlier:
http://www.theverge.com/2013/3/14/4098896/netflix-chief-product-officer-neil-hunt-expect-4k-streaming-within-a-year-or-two
Do you actually think Netflix is going to invest in 4k if it's not going to happen? Please.



Ian
Edited by mailiang - 5/14/13 at 8:43pm
post #131 of 132
Haven't seen mentioned yet...

Not sure what they mean by public. Hopefully subscribers will still be able to see expiring soon titles in their que.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/05/14/netflix-watch-instantly-expiring-dates-api-removed-streampocalypse/
post #132 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by biliam1982 View Post

Haven't seen mentioned yet...

Not sure what they mean by public. Hopefully subscribers will still be able to see expiring soon titles in their que.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/05/14/netflix-watch-instantly-expiring-dates-api-removed-streampocalypse/

Good find. I wonder how instantwatcher.com is going to work after they debunk the API. We should still see the info in the Netflix applications themselves, just not from 3rd party sources any more.

This article seems to be in direct response to threads like this, saying that the titles like 'Netflix to Nix Nearly 1800 Titles' can be misleading and cause confusion to the general public.
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