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Sony AVRs - Still a player in amp market?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I was shopping at Amazon the other day (maybe a new Sony LCD is in my future) and I saw some Sony AVRs. Checked at Sony.com to see if maybe they are pulling a Panasonic move and getting out of the amp business ... no, they still sell them. Normal ones and extreme ES series.

 

So, I got to wondering ... why are they totally off the radar these days? Seem like when someone asks for AVR suggestions (in the $400-$800 where the majority of us live) you get the same responses ... Denon, Onkyo, Pioneer ... maybe Yamaha on the low-end and Marantz on the high. No-one ever talks about Sony amps.

 

Between my brother and I, we still have 2 working (pre DD5.1/AC3/DTS) Sony AVRs and some working Sony All-In-Ones. My point being, reliability doesn't seem to be an issue.

 

Anyway, just wondering if anyone knew what was up. I knew this would be the place to ask.

post #2 of 11
Most of Sony's line of receivers are seriously underpowered and under-engineered. However, their ES line (Their top of the line) has been pretty well received over the last few years. The biggest problem with Sony in regards to their receivers is all of the brands you mentioned usually offer more and offer it better. Another problem is their pricing. If you look at their ES line, what they charge, would (in most people's opinion) get you something way better from another company. Now, their ES line receivers do come with a 5 year warranty, which, pretty much, beats out everyone else! Check out their ES line here.

http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId=-1&identifier=S_ES_Receivers

Granted, you can find the receivers for a decent price at places like amazon and the like. If you can find a good deal on one, they're certainly worthy. Just don't pay Sony's ridiculous MSRP through their website! I suppose, I should cut them some slack because nobody wants to pay MSRP regardless of the brand. I think most people just trust other brands like Onkyo, Denon, Pioneer, Marantz, etc... because they seem to specialize more in audio and the like, where Sony dabbles in absolutely everything.

You seem to be talking more about mid-range receivers though, from the prices you mentioned. In that regard, most people I've heard, consider Sony's low to midrange offerings to be severely underpowered when compared to the alternative brands mentioned.
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesla1856 View Post

I was shopping at Amazon the other day (maybe a new Sony LCD is in my future) and I saw some Sony AVRs. Checked at Sony.com to see if maybe they are pulling a Panasonic move and getting out of the amp business ... no, they still sell them. Normal ones and extreme ES series.

So, I got to wondering ... why are they totally off the radar these days? Seem like when someone asks for AVR suggestions (in the $400-$800 where the majority of us live) you get the same responses ... Denon, Onkyo, Pioneer ... maybe Yamaha on the low-end and Marantz on the high. No-one ever talks about Sony amps.

Between my brother and I, we still have 2 working (pre DD5.1/AC3/DTS) Sony AVRs and some working Sony All-In-Ones. My point being, reliability doesn't seem to be an issue.

Anyway, just wondering if anyone knew what was up. I knew this would be the place to ask.

I have the new STR-DN1030 from Sony and was reviewed highly on CNET. I have had it for about 5 months and think it is really good. And it has all the bells and whistles too. Got it for $100 off retail on sale - just under 400. The only thing it lacks is Audyssey. but has it's own calibration. It's rated at 135w per channel but that's overstated (like most) and actually goes to 80 watts per channel at 7 channels. That's really good and drives my 7.1 system well. Lots of folks say this was the first mid-range (non ES model) that puts Sony back in the game. The new model 1040 is coming out soon - listed at $599.
post #4 of 11
[quote name="MrEastSide" url="/t/1470827/sony-avrs-still-a-player-in-amp-market#post_23265757" In that regard, most people I've heard, consider Sony's low to midrange offerings to be severely underpowered when compared to the alternative brands mentioned.[/quote]

The Sony 1030 puts out more power per channel than most AVRs costing twice as much.

Denon 2313, $900 list
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 126.8 watts
1% distortion at 152.1 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 77.7 watts
1% distortion at 90.8 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 74.3 watts
1% distortion at 84.3 watts

Yamaha 473/573, $450/$550
Yamaha RX-V473 A/V Receiver
Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
N/A (protection engages)

Yamaha 1020 $1100 list
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 113.5 watts
1% distortion at 129.2 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 63.9 watts
1% distortion at 73.2 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 57.0 watts
1% distortion at 65.1 watts

Denon 1913 $580 list
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 102.3 watts
1% distortion at 117.7 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 70.5 watts
1% distortion at 81.7 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 52.7 watts
1% distortion at 68.7 watts

Sony 1030- $500 list (and it includes wifi and blue tooth)
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 118.8 watts
1% distortion at 134.7 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 81.5 watts
1% distortion at 90.4 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 65.4 watts
1% distortion at 78.2 watts

The only AVRs that put out more power for the money are the Pioneer SC 1222 and 1522 which are on sale for ridiculous low prices, other wise they would be near $1000 or more at list.

The Sony also did very well in video per Home Theater.
post #5 of 11
^^^ That's if you believe Sony's numbers. Like I said, their ES line is pretty nice. If you plan to go with an ES receiver, you'll probably be more than happy. But, any of their entry level receivers, in the $300-$400 dollar category, no way! From what I read a couple of years back, regarding those entry level models, you'd be lucky if you got 30% or so of the rated power out of the receiver, even if you were only running two channels. Planning to run full surround sound, and wanting to turn it up moderately loud? Forget about it!

I would even question the 1030's ability to put out more power than some of the other models you mentioned. But, unless you're planning to listen to your speakers at ear bleeding levels, it won't matter anyway. The ES receivers are still nice. Like I said, I'd just avoid Sony's lower end offerings like the plague!
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrEastSide View Post

^^^ That's if you believe Sony's numbers. Like I said, their ES line is pretty nice. If you plan to go with an ES receiver, you'll probably be more than happy. But, any of their entry level receivers, in the $300-$400 dollar category, no way! From what I read a couple of years back, regarding those entry level models, you'd be lucky if you got 30% or so of the rated power out of the receiver, even if you were only running two channels. Planning to run full surround sound, and wanting to turn it up moderately loud? Forget about it!

I would even question the 1030's ability to put out more power than some of the other models you mentioned. But, unless you're planning to listen to your speakers at ear bleeding levels, it won't matter anyway. The ES receivers are still nice. Like I said, I'd just avoid Sony's lower end offerings like the plague!


agreed. the 1030 is different though. 7 channel test showed close to 80. impressive Imho. previous Low end models were junk. you are right about those misleading figures too. wish they would be calculated and published by an independent group or something.
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eah9 View Post


 wish they would be calculated and published by an independent group or something.

Agreed. Thank you for the mini-review of the Sony 1030.

 

Thanks all for the good info.

post #8 of 11
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kini62 View Post

Denon 2313, $900 list
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 126.8 watts
1% distortion at 152.1 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 77.7 watts
1% distortion at 90.8 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 74.3 watts
1% distortion at 84.3 watts

Yamaha 473/573, $450/$550
Yamaha RX-V473 A/V Receiver
Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
N/A (protection engages)

Yamaha 1020 $1100 list
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 113.5 watts
1% distortion at 129.2 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 63.9 watts
1% distortion at 73.2 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 57.0 watts
1% distortion at 65.1 watts

Denon 1913 $580 list
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 102.3 watts
1% distortion at 117.7 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 70.5 watts
1% distortion at 81.7 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 52.7 watts
1% distortion at 68.7 watts

Sony 1030- $500 list (and it includes wifi and blue tooth)
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 118.8 watts
1% distortion at 134.7 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 81.5 watts
1% distortion at 90.4 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 65.4 watts
1% distortion at 78.2 watts

Where did you get these numbers?
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBWIII View Post

Where did you get these numbers?

Hometheater.com does these lab tests....

Sony STR-DN1030
http://www.hometheater.com/content/sony-str-dn1030-av-receiver-ht-labs-measures

Denon AVR-1913
http://www.hometheater.com/content/denon-avr-1913-av-receiver-ht-labs-measures

Denon AVR-2313
http://www.hometheater.com/content/denon-avr-2313ci-av-receiver-ht-labs-measures

Yamaha RX-V473/573
http://www.hometheater.com/content/yamaha-rx-v473-and-rx-v573-av-receivers-ht-labs-measures

Yamaha RX-A1020
http://www.hometheater.com/content/yamaha-rx-a1020-av-receiver-ht-labs-measures
post #11 of 11

Yes, with the STR-DN1030 and now the new STR-DN1040, Sony AVR's are back in the game (not that they were ever out of it IMO). For the price and features and especially the unbelievable audio and video performance these receivers put out for this mid level price, they are hard to beat!
The Sony auto-calibration system also is really engineered well and is pretty much dead accurate and fast. I believe all those other Audyssey are not as accurate due to them being way too complex and the algorithms can give false readings due to them trying to measure so many extra parameters.
The Sony streamlined auto measurement system IMO is just as effective and much simpler. So don't just diss the Sony's because they don't have this overhyped auto-calibration Audyssey feature. The audio from these receivers is simply superb for a $500 price range! Don't pass on them.
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