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Laserdisc S-Video to HDMI

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I recently bought a Panasonic P50S60 Plasma. I had a 40" Mitsubishi CRT. Yeah, I know. Anyway I still enjoy my laserdiscs. I have a Pioneer CLD-79. It has S-Video and a composite output. How do I get the best video signal to my TV?
My TV only has 2 HDMI inputs and one composite. My HD DVR and Blu-Ray player are in the HDMI inputs.
I can easily swap out one of my HDMI connections to watch a laserdisc when I want to as my TV is on a stand. I have yet to attach the player to the composite because I don't want to pull the player out of the cabinet and run everything twice. Also I'm running my audio through a JVC DSP-A1 receiver.
I've read a little bit about converters and scalers but I've been out of the game for about 15 years and I'm not sure of what I need. I could use some guidance.
post #2 of 17
You'll need something like this. It includes upscaling which, while not necessary, can be very useful if the display does not have scaling.
post #3 of 17
The monoprice box is a very generic (and cheap) deinterlacer and upscaler.

There's an excellent change that your TV will do a better on it's own. And for that matter I wouldn't worry about the connection being composite only. While your TV won't have the best comb filter around, it's very likely at least on par with the one built into your LD player.

Unless you spend a lot more money, it won't get any better than running composite directly into the TV set.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks. After thinking about it I figured my new TVs processor would do a pretty good job compared to my LD. I'm just going to go with a quality cable and the composite.
post #5 of 17
Composite video is Laserdisc's native format. If you use S-video, you're relying on the quality of the comb filter inside the LD player. Very few LD players (arguably none) have good enough comb filters to make this worthwhile. Even the cheapest of modern TVs have comb filters at least comparable to if not better than even the best LD players. Composite is almost always your best connection choice with Laserdisc.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

Composite video is Laserdisc's native format. If you use S-video, you're relying on the quality of the comb filter inside the LD player. Very few LD players (arguably none) have good enough comb filters to make this worthwhile. Even the cheapest of modern TVs have comb filters at least comparable to if not better than even the best LD players. Composite is almost always your best connection choice with Laserdisc.

Why do you say composite?

Wouldn't component be a better connection than Composite?

Confused.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TK Doom View Post

Why do you say composite?

Wouldn't component be a better connection than Composite?

Confused.

LaserDisk is a COMPOSITE signal right off the disk. DVD is COMPONENT off the disk. Svideo is halfway in between in terms of transmission quality but as the signal on the laserdisk is composite, it must be converted to Svideo inside the laser disk player. If you feed composite to your TV then the TV must convert it to Svideo then onto component.

It comes down to which has the better converter. And based on technology advances, the TV is far likely to have a better converter.

Now just to confuse the issue more, some laserdisk players convert the composite to Svideo for noise reduction, than back to composite. So in this case Svideo would be the best connection. But that's hard to tell without a service manual. I believe the CLD 79 has direct composite out. I think it's the CLD97 or 99 that does this double conversion.

So what it really comes down to is which looks best to you. Just buy a low cost composite and Svideo cable. Don't spend more than $5-10$ on either one. Then just pick which ever looks best to you. In the end, that's all that counts.
post #8 of 17
Yes, I just found this out while re-connecting my Laser disc to my system.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the details. I was thinking I'd need some type of scaler. I wasn't thinking about what my new TV could do. I have a lot of good cables laying around so I'll try both types & leave it at that.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TK Doom View Post

Why do you say composite?

Wouldn't component be a better connection than Composite?

Confused.

No Laserdisc players can output Component Video for Laserdisc. The only LD players with Component outputs were the LD/DVD combi players at the end, and the Component connections only work with DVD.
post #11 of 17
European Sony LD players did some internal composite to RGBs conversion and allowed LD playback through RGB scart connections. Terrible quality though.... rolleyes.gif
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Well after finally being able to get back to this I realized that I misspoke. My TV doesn't have composite but component jacks. I need a converter now. I see that a lot of people purchased that little white box labeled "MINI". There are others that cost more but they add S-video and/or component switching also. Are they all pretty much the same when it comes to converting composite? Do they all require power?
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by simkofab View Post

My TV doesn't have composite but component jacks.

Composite is the lowest common denominator for displaying video on a TV and I would expect to be retained until analogue video is removed completely.

Composite video has a yellow socket and is usually associated with a red and white socket for stereo analogue audio.

It's possible a TV might locate these sockets to the side if not the back.

If you have a DVD Recorder, they are usually the easiest way to convert laserdisc composite to HDMI or component, but may not have the absolute best quality: that takes a lot more searching and selecting effort.
post #14 of 17
I'd be very interested to hear how a laser disc looks on a plasma...my guess is that it would not look good at all...but, let us know!
post #15 of 17
it looks really good, i'm using a cheap scaler and s-video to hdmi, led tv
post #16 of 17
I have a LD plugged into my plasma using the S- Video connection it looks really good. I have another LD plugged into my other plasma using the composite connection it also looks good, it's better than I thought it would look myself, I'm quite impressed with the results.
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by simkofab View Post

Well after finally being able to get back to this I realized that I misspoke. My TV doesn't have composite but component jacks. I need a converter now. I see that a lot of people purchased that little white box labeled "MINI". There are others that cost more but they add S-video and/or component switching also. Are they all pretty much the same when it comes to converting composite? Do they all require power?

Hopefully you've solved your connection problem by now but...


Yes, converters which generate a component signal all require power. Really cheap in-line composite to S-video converters could get by without one because they just included some in-line filters to separate the chroma from the luminance signal. Component video signals are more complicated.

Double check the component connections on your TV. Some TV manufacturers have merged their composite and component inputs so that there are only 3 RCA connectors but one of them can be used for a composite signal.
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