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Power Conditioner: Always On or Switched?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Mine has both always on & switched outlets. Obviously DVR needs always on so it can record whenever. Any other components need to be powered all the time? Could be damaged if unpowered when not on use?
post #2 of 11
I leave my conditioner on. And been doing that with any conditioner ive tried in the past years without any problems. My HT room, computer room, and my little setup in my master bedroom. IMO, I think it shoud stay on especially if one uses a universal remote. Wait... I take that back.. The only time I turn every thing off or unplug my conditioner off the wall if when I take a vacation for more then 3 days. Away from home...
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhed View Post

I leave my conditioner on. And been doing that with any conditioner ive tried in the past years without any problems. My HT room, computer room, and my little setup in my master bedroom. IMO, I think it shoud stay on especially if one uses a universal remote. Wait... I take that back.. The only time I turn every thing off or unplug my conditioner off the wall if when I take a vacation for more then 3 days. Away from home...

I agree. I really see no reason to disconnect power to your devices unless you're leaving for days at a time. I do use one of my switched outlets for an external hard drive, but that's only because I'm not always using the hard drive and I don't feel that it needs to be running idle, for days, when it's not being used. Otherwise, I never disconnect power from any components. Not that it would hurt, but I think you're better off leaving things connected, versus, constantly, disconnecting.
post #4 of 11
Of course there is a reason, to save power.

However, there's generally no reason to use a power conditioner.

"Could be damaged if unpowered when not on use?"
confused.gif
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kilian.ca View Post

Of course there is a reason, to save power.

However, there's generally no reason to use a power conditioner.

"Could be damaged if unpowered when not on use?"
confused.gif

My interpretation of the last question was the OP was wondering if the conditioner still conditions/protects the components that are plugged into the "switched outlets" rather than plugged into the "always on" outlets.

My thoughts on this are that the "always on" outlets on your unit act as a "pass through" outlet, so that if you turn the unit off, the components connected to "always on" will still receive power. However, when the unit is turned off, the components that are plugged into the "always on" are not receiving a conditioned power even though you can still use them.

Now, I'm not 100% sure on this but I think all components are being protected from surge regardless of the outlet on the unit they are plugged into and the unit is protecting them from surge regardless of if the unit is powered on or off. Maybe somebody that knows for sure can chime in? I'm sure it would help more if we knew the model of your unit.

-Sean
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kilian.ca View Post

Of course there is a reason, to save power.

However, there's generally no reason to use a power conditioner.

"Could be damaged if unpowered when not on use?"
confused.gif

Aside from a crappy electronic component drawing a ton of power when it's off, how much power would you really be saving? I wouldn't think enough to make it worth, constantly, disconnecting and reconnecting the power.
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
I'm the OP and what I have is a Belkin Power Console PF 31. Manual: http://cache-www.belkin.com/support/dl/p75601fc_ap21100fc10-blk.pdf

I got it because of apparently uneven power (lights dimming momentarily, and not just from the central air going on) from PEPCO, my power company and the sudden, unexplained demise of equipment. I decided to install a ground for the outlet where I plug my AV stuff (the house is 1959 with 2-wire, no ground) and got a deal on this Power Console.

The idea is it protects from surges and "conditions" the flow. It did seem to clear up various intermittent issues and no lost equipment since.

Like some computer surge protectors it has some outlets that are protected but always on and some that are "switched"--controlled by a power switch on the front.

The DVR needs to be unswitched, in other words ON all the time so it can record the shows I have programmed for it to record. I have FiOS HD DVR.

I figure to connect the other components to the switched outlets so that when I turn the power switch off, after turning off the components (TV, Receiver, woofer, etc,) everything goes completely off, eliminating the "stand by" power they use so they can respond to the remote controls.

I have not tried to set up a universal remote with one button that dims the lights, turns on the appropriate components & hands me the beer. That, of course, wouldn't work without first turning on this unit.

With the "Smart" -ness of my new Samsung UN60F8000, I'm sure Samsung would say it is designed to be in stand-by when not in use, but does that really do anything besides use that "tiny trickle" of power?

I kinda like the idea of a positive "everything off when not in use". Except for the dumb DVR that has even a harddrive that runs 24/7!

Jaums
post #8 of 11
Fair enough if you find the conditioner helpful.

I have many surge protectors in different rooms and I switch most of these protectors off or where practical unplug the power cables when not in use. I even switch the PVR off at night: there is seldom any need to record anything overnight as the PVR can simultaneously record 3 o4 4 programs at once during the day. I have to leave the wireless phones and mini-stereo systems with clock on.

I wouldn't get into any argument if it's worth doing, but it's something I can easily do as a routine and I feel comfortable doing it. Some people take great pains to price match for things that only save less than a dollar, if it's worth it to them then I'm not to judge them.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaums View Post

I'm the OP and what I have is a Belkin Power Console PF 31. Manual: http://cache-www.belkin.com/support/dl/p75601fc_ap21100fc10-blk.pdf

I got it because of apparently uneven power (lights dimming momentarily, and not just from the central air going on) from PEPCO, my power company and the sudden, unexplained demise of equipment. I decided to install a ground for the outlet where I plug my AV stuff (the house is 1959 with 2-wire, no ground) and got a deal on this Power Console.

The idea is it protects from surges and "conditions" the flow. It did seem to clear up various intermittent issues and no lost equipment since.

Like some computer surge protectors it has some outlets that are protected but always on and some that are "switched"--controlled by a power switch on the front.

The DVR needs to be unswitched, in other words ON all the time so it can record the shows I have programmed for it to record. I have FiOS HD DVR.

I figure to connect the other components to the switched outlets so that when I turn the power switch off, after turning off the components (TV, Receiver, woofer, etc,) everything goes completely off, eliminating the "stand by" power they use so they can respond to the remote controls.

I have not tried to set up a universal remote with one button that dims the lights, turns on the appropriate components & hands me the beer. That, of course, wouldn't work without first turning on this unit.

With the "Smart" -ness of my new Samsung UN60F8000, I'm sure Samsung would say it is designed to be in stand-by when not in use, but does that really do anything besides use that "tiny trickle" of power?

I kinda like the idea of a positive "everything off when not in use". Except for the dumb DVR that has even a harddrive that runs 24/7!

Jaums

IMO, if you're using the system only once in a while, there is no harm in shutting off power to everything except the DVR. If you're going to be using the TV, receiver, etc. daily, you might as well just leave everything powered. Get the Kill-A-Watt accessory and see exactly how much power the system is drawing in standby, and base your decision on the result. Its available from many retailers, including Amazon for around $25.00 or less.

Kill A Watt power usage monitor
post #10 of 11
I always switch everything off at the wall when I've finished using it, bar the FreeSat DVR box which records programs at all manner of times during the day and night.

I'm sure there is no need as power consumption when off is tiny, and house fires and lightning strikes that could kill something or burn your house down are extremely rare events, but I'm a 'better safe than sorry' kinda guy tongue.gif
post #11 of 11
I have a Monster power center which has "switched" and "always on" outlets. I have my DVR plugged into a switched outlet specifically so I can turn it off when I want it off since it does not have an on/off switch. Cable DVRs are notorious power hogs. However, my Toshiba TV is plugged into an always on outlet since the it loses the clock time every time it loses power.
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