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Samsung Skin Tones

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
I recently got a UN50ES6150 from Costco & am having a difficult time getting decent flesh colors. People & objects usually look great when the scene is shot outdoors in daylight. But when it's a dimmer evening scene or most inside scenes the people usually have an orange cast like a painted on tan, and sometimes a pink cast. I realize people are going to look different but I've never experienced such an extreme range.

I've tried most of the posted settings & also used the AVSHD 709 calibration disc. I've even tried the settings that are supposed to reduce or eliminate CE Dimming but nothing seems to help. A lot of indoor scenes appear darker than what I'm used to & the people have a somewhat orange-ish look. I don't know if I'm experiencing CE Dimming or perhaps this HDTV has blacker blacks than I am used to.

I don't see any obvious fluctuation when scenes change. So if an inside scene looks dark as far as I can I tell it's because that's the way the director wanted the lighting. My wife watches Dancing With the Stars & I look in sometimes. When people are in the rehearsal studio they look pretty good, maybe because it has good lighting. But on the main dance floor most of the time they have a orange cast, and the overall lighting is not as bright as the rehearsal studio. I don't want to give the impression the main dance floor area is super dark, but the audience background just seems darker than on my old HDTV. If there is a close up of the judges they have the painted on tan look. Again It could be the lighting & my old HDTV just didn't have the color or dynamic range to display such a wide variation in flesh tones, I don't know. But I've never seen so much non-fleshy looking skin tones.

Any calibration suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
post #2 of 31
I had precisely that problem 2 years ago with a Samsung UN46C6300.

Drove me nuts. I returned it.

There was *nothing* I could do, and no set of suggested calibrations from anyone could solve it. If they were too red and the red was diminished then they became a greenish. Basically red and green are the additive components to yellow, which is primarily what composes Caucasian skin tones.

But it was really confusing too: there were moments when faces were part red, and part greenish. And then that overly made-up orange. The only thing that balanced everything was an immensely washed out look.

Folks at the time seem to be blaming the panel lottery, for which they felt Samsung was particularly bad at controlling. I wasn't going to sink any more time into the thing, so I punted.
post #3 of 31
Something else happened as well that I don't understand.

At one point I seemed to have entered a state where no change did anything. As if everything was statically held. It wasn't in any kind of store or engineering mode either.

Someone elsewhere in this forum (beats me where) said that Samsung configs actually had some state you could enter that was extremely hard to get out of. It was apparently by design, but a dumb design.

I wasn't going to push that particular boulder up a muddy hill any longer.
post #4 of 31
Right now I have a Sony KDL-60R550A (their new 2013 model using an LG panel). I like it a lot, but the out of the box "normal" setting produces skin tones (sometimes) that look like Mimi on the Drew Carey show. On non-pay FIOS channels mostly, which I have to wonder about.

I'm going to Disney WOW it in the next couple days to see if I can tame that beast, because so far I really like this thing.
post #5 of 31
I've been troubled by the same problem for years with my 46 inch Samsung. I could never get the great colors (especially skin tones and darker hues) from the Samsung that I can get from my LCD computer monitor (a Viewsonic 22 inch). I have the Samsung attached via HDMI to my HTPC, and looked at the contrast image from lagom.nl/lcd-test/. There it was plain as day - the contrast image on my monitor shows a gradual change from bright to dark on all colors, with midpoint on the scale being around 16 on all colors - perfect. On the Samsung, the color stays about the same brightness all the way down to 12, then has a sharp drop off. Nothing I can do (even custom colorspace settings) will change that characteristic on the Samsung, and not even gamma settings. Gamma changes the very bottom as does black tone and brightness. Contrast only affects the brighter area, but nothing corrects the colors above the 12 mark from being pushed to the top. Pushing the gains and primary (RGB) levels and dropping the color helped linearity some, but the result was that the darker areas of the picture were now missing and it was a horrible mess. Another area I looked at was the gamma measurement on lagom, it is far too wide and off-center on the 48% scale. I don't know if this is an LCD panel issue or Samsung video processing characteristic, but I can tell you I have not been able to find a setting that I am happy with (and I've been constantly fiddling with it for about 5 years now looking for that magic setting). As far as the panel lottery goes for the 750 series Samsungs - it is a Samsung panel as well.
Edited by webgrandeur - 5/9/13 at 8:25am
post #6 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by webgrandeur View Post

I've been troubled by the same problem for years with my 46 inch Samsung. I could never get the great colors (especially skin tones and darker hues) from the Samsung that I can get from my LCD computer monitor (a Viewsonic 22 inch). I have the Samsung attached via HDMI to my HTPC, and looked at the contrast image from lagom.nl/lcd-test/. There it was plain as day - the contrast image on my monitor shows a gradual change from bright to dark on all colors, with midpoint on the scale being around 16 on all colors - perfect. On the Samsung, the color stays about the same brightness all the way down to 12, then has a sharp drop off. Nothing I can do (even custom colorspace settings) will change that characteristic on the Samsung, and not even gamma settings. Gamma changes the very bottom as does black tone and brightness. Contrast only affects the brighter area, but nothing corrects the colors above the 12 mark from being pushed to the top. Pushing the gains and primary (RGB) levels and dropping the color helped linearity some, but the result was that the darker areas of the picture were now missing and it was a horrible mess. Another area I looked at was the gamma measurement on lagom, it is far too wide and off-center on the 48% scale. I don't know if this is an LCD panel issue or Samsung video processing characteristic, but I can tell you I have not been able to find a setting that I am happy with (and I've been constantly fiddling with it for about 5 years now looking for that magic setting). As far as the panel lottery goes for the 750 series Samsungs - it is a Samsung panel as well.

Yes, that was the other problem. Dark grays, shadows, even browns, all collapsed to black. No matter what.
post #7 of 31
Thread Starter 
Thanks for replies -

I’ve adjusted every setting that there is but to no avail. I’ve even tried turning the Red Offset & Gain controls all the way down but people still look like they have a painted on tan.

I also experienced this: “But it was really confusing too: there were moments when faces were part red, and part greenish. And then that overly made-up orange. The only thing that balanced everything was an immensely washed out look.”

I hate to return the set because the outside/daylight scenes on the Samsung looks nicer than my old Sony. But those orange flesh tones are not acceptable.

What limits my selection is the size. I’m coming from a 42” and 50” is pretty much as big as I want to go for my room. I’ll have to see what else is out there, but 50” is not as popular as 55” or 60”.

Thanks again. At least I’m not alone in seeing this color problem.
post #8 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike99 View Post

Thanks for replies -

I’ve adjusted every setting that there is but to no avail. I’ve even tried turning the Red Offset & Gain controls all the way down but people still look like they have a painted on tan.

I also experienced this: “But it was really confusing too: there were moments when faces were part red, and part greenish. And then that overly made-up orange. The only thing that balanced everything was an immensely washed out look.”

I hate to return the set because the outside/daylight scenes on the Samsung looks nicer than my old Sony. But those orange flesh tones are not acceptable.

What limits my selection is the size. I’m coming from a 42” and 50” is pretty much as big as I want to go for my room. I’ll have to see what else is out there, but 50” is not as popular as 55” or 60”.

Thanks again. At least I’m not alone in seeing this color problem.

Sony KDL-50R550A? I'm currently testing out the 60". Also the sony W802A comes in 47"
post #9 of 31
My UN40ES6500 has a setting specifically for flesh tones its located down in one of of the picture sub menus. I havent had to adjust that setting so i cant speak to what effect it has.
My set calibrated fine usind the Disney WOW disk.
post #10 of 31

You should never change the gray scale setting in order to get right color. Calibrate you gray scale for gray and leave it at that.

Color comes from color decoder and Samsung has overall accurate color decoder once the color space and color level are set up.

In the main menu make sure that color is set properly. My new sam es6500 required that I set the color level from 50 to 35.

I have also a panny plasma and side by side the color are very very similar after calibration. Skin tone is spot on as well.

 

Gray scale if not set up improperly would make a slight difference unless it is way off.

post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaspianM View Post

You should never change the gray scale setting in order to get right color. Calibrate you gray scale for gray and leave it at that.

I'm not saying that, and I don't think the OP is either.

There were two distinct issues with the Samsung panel I had. The collapsing of grays and the R/G color issue.
post #12 of 31
I agree with the assessment that grayscale is not the issue. That is one of the things I keep tabs on (turn the color to 0 and also use a good B&W gradient test pattern). The problem, as noted using the test image from the website in my prior post in this thread, the image of a face is dependent on the fill in of the shadow areas. Plenty of fill in (outdoors, sunshine) and there is no problem. Some fill in shadow, and the shadowed area is pushed brighter (same as turning up the color control, but just on the shadow areas) leaving a weird over-saturated shadow with incorrect color. Too little shadow fill in, and the color intensity is way too low, leaving greenish-gray and purplish blotches instead of shadows looking like the person lost in a mossy-mud fight, or an actor from Night of the Living Dead that forgot to remove the makeup. Maybe there's a calibration setting available to ISF calibrators, but I don't want to spend hundreds to find out, nor should I. Perhaps it is a luck of the draw, but from my experience, the color linearity (tracking?) from full bright to black level is sloppy (to be kind), and makes for a great picture sometimes, but in lower light situations (i.e., home) and many scenes in movies or TV shows, it renders a picture that sends me scrambling for the remote to fix the picture every time (which I can't do). If there is some advise on how to fix the linearity problem, I'm all ears.
Edited by webgrandeur - 5/9/13 at 1:40pm
post #13 of 31

I replied to Mile99 when he said " I’ve even tried turning the Red Offset & Gain controls all the way down but people still look like they have a painted on tan." Just wanted to make sure.

Majority of issues comes from the source and/or lack of proper set up. But obviously not all. There is also unit to unit variations.

post #14 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by webgrandeur View Post

I agree with the assessment that grayscale is not the issue. That is one of the things I keep tabs on (turn the color to 0 and also use a good B&W gradient test pattern). The problem, as noted using the test image from the website in my prior post in this thread, the image of a face is dependent on the fill in of the shadow areas. Plenty of fill in (outdoors, sunshine) and there is no problem. Some fill in shadow, and the shadowed area is pushed brighter (same as turning up the color control, but just on the shadow areas) leaving a weird over-saturated shadow with incorrect color. Too little shadow fill in, and the color intensity is way too low, leaving greenish-gray and purplish blotches instead of shadows looking like the person lost in a mossy-mud fight, or an actor from Night of the Living Dead that forgot to remove the makeup. Maybe there's a calibration setting available to ISF calibrators, but I don't want to spend hundreds to find out, nor should I. Perhaps it is a luck of the draw, but from my experience, the color linearity (tracking?) from full bright to black level is sloppy (to be kind), and makes for a great picture sometimes, but in lower light situations (i.e., home) and many scenes in movies or TV shows, it renders a picture that sends me scrambling for the remote to fix the picture every time (which I can't do). If there is some advise on how to fix the linearity problem, I'm all ears.

Try this. Turn your color to zero. Then increase your contrast to max or low. Then reverse it. All be done in still all white frame. If color of white changes then you have gray scale set up issue. Green in shadow vs. bright is ususally a gray scale problem not color.

post #15 of 31
Thread Starter 
Just to clarify -

My color level ended up at 35 when I adjusted things be eye. This just seemed the most pleasing to me. When I used the AVSHD disc it was a sort of a tossup between 35 & 36 and I went with 36.

I did not work with the Offset & Gain adjustments until later. And of course adjusted them when I tried these settings.
http://reviews.lcdtvbuyingguide.com/samsung-lcd-tv/samsung-es6100-picturesettings.html

I get decent shadow detail in a well lit scene. In dark scenes there appears to be very little or no shadow detail. Turning up the Brightness helps this in the short term but ruins the levels in lighter scenes.

Some people say the CE Dimming causes dark scenes to go too dark. One of the tweaks I did was supposed to turn off CE Dimming & maybe it did. But the dark scenes are still too dark, IMHO. And the Movie mode supposed to turn off the CE Dimming also, but again I could not tell any difference.

Without using any instrument such as a Spyder, is there a way to do any reasonable gray scale adjustment by following CaspianM’s directions? IOW how would I know what to change in those 10 R,G,B levels?
post #16 of 31

Make sure your dynamic contrast & black tone are off. HDMI black level at low. See if changes anything for shadow detail.

Gray scale needs colorimeter. But a quick & dirty method is:

-Display all white pattern with contrast at 90 & brightness at 45. Go thru gain controls. Set the R, G, B for milky white or preference.

-Display all black like 10 or 20 ire pattern. This time tweak the bias R,G, B so that you get the best black.

Here are my #'s for D7500 Kelvin, daylight everyday watching except movies:

 

Standard mode, color temp:standard, color space: native. I have it on custom but it is calibrated.

offsets: R=25, G=23, B=18

Gains:  R=25, G=20, B=16

 

You need a calib disk for that. Once done copy those settings to your desired input picture menu.

 

If that doesn't work or doesn't get your there close enough  then your issue may not be grayscale. Regardless it should improve things substantially.

Post your thoughts afterward.

post #17 of 31
I just wanted to add a comment about color issues regarding accurate flesh tones. Many people aren't aware that Hollywood has been going through a phase for quite a while now regarding altering color timing for their blu-ray releases. It is fairly common now that blu-ray releases of older films go through rather extensive color-timing alterations, often going heavy on orange or teal for "mood" - and thus affecting skin tones in a way that they no longer look natural:

http://theabyssgazes.blogspot.com/2010/03/teal-and-orange-hollywood-please-stop.html

I've been noticing this for a while now, and if you read forum.blu-ray.com on a regular basis you'll notice many blu-ray releases of older catalog titles getting the teal/orange makeover. I have several blu-rays myself that are vastly different in appearance to their original theatrical releases or previously-releases DVDs. It's getting harder and harder to find films with natural skin tones because Hollywood is currently leaning towards over-stylized and hyper-saturated colors. This means just because you notice orange-tinted skin tones doesn't necessarily mean it's the tv - it could just be the color timing of the film.

Broadcast HDTV is another story altogether - it seems every channel has a different brightness or contrast or color hue. Best you can do is just adjust the tv using the tips in this thread and maybe the AVS disc or the Disney WOW disc which is excellent, and leave it at that. Personally, I have my color saturation on my F8000 turned down to around 40 for the same reason - any higher and everybody looks far too over-saturated. I like natural skin tones as well and it's hard to make that happen when everybody over-saturates everything for effect.
post #18 of 31

Judging a TV's skin tone from a movie is not a good idea. As Eagle said live telecast is closer but then again that varies too. Having said that CNN's "out Front" I like Erin Burnett's skin tone.smile.gif

post #19 of 31
Thread Starter 
I have been watching recorded TV programs either from satellite or OTA.

I am using Standard mode with dynamic contrast & black tone off. I have to double check HDMI, but it was grayed out & therefore I could not change whatever it was.

I spent a little time earlier tweaking it. I used the built in Expert Pattern #1 with the gray scale. It looked just very slightly reddish in the lighter bars, but this varied with the brightness setting. Putting contrast at 75 & brightness at 45 and Red Offset or Gain to 0 seemed to correct this. I chose to put Gain at 0.

Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I'll work with it again a bit later.
post #20 of 31
I had similar problems with a Samsung ln46d550 about a year or so ago. With mine, it was more of a greenish cast or tinge, especially during darker scenes. This pointed at some errors in the grayscale. I burned far too much time trying to adjust white balance / 2 point grayscale by eye, until I ultimately concluded that adjusting grayscale by eye was sort of like trying to solve an ever-changing Rubik's cube puzzle blind-folded and with an arm tied behind my back. I would get it looking decent at one moment and it would look wrong with something else later on. You could look into hardware+software calibration packages from Spectracal and Chromapure, but they'll cost you in terms of both money and time.

Personally, I swapped it for another brand, ran through some very basic adjustments using a setup disc (no changes at all to grayscale or color management), and everything simply looked as it should. Consistently.
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike99 View Post

I have been watching recorded TV programs either from satellite or OTA.

I am using Standard mode with dynamic contrast & black tone off. I have to double check HDMI, but it was grayed out & therefore I could not change whatever it was.

I spent a little time earlier tweaking it. I used the built in Expert Pattern #1 with the gray scale. It looked just very slightly reddish in the lighter bars, but this varied with the brightness setting. Putting contrast at 75 & brightness at 45 and Red Offset or Gain to 0 seemed to correct this. I chose to put Gain at 0.

Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I'll work with it again a bit later.

Gains at zero?? And it looks good now?? Something is wrong.

post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by eagle_2 View Post

Broadcast HDTV is another story altogether - it seems every channel has a different brightness or contrast or color hue. Best you can do is just adjust the tv using the tips in this thread and maybe the AVS disc or the Disney WOW disc which is excellent, and leave it at that. Personally, I have my color saturation on my F8000 turned down to around 40 for the same reason - any higher and everybody looks far too over-saturated. I like natural skin tones as well and it's hard to make that happen when everybody over-saturates everything for effect.

Yes, the broadcast stuff is often absurd.

I have noticed, however, that the premium channels are by far the least absurd.
post #23 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaspianM View Post

Gains at zero?? And it looks good now?? Something is wrong.

One of the things I previously tried was turning down the Red Offset and/or Red Gain. For a while I tried with both at 0. I'm not sure how much these are supposed to affect the color but the picture did not change much. It did have slightly less red but I thought the picture would have been lacking a lot more red. It did not look good, & it really didn't look worse. Just different.

As mentioned earlier the grayscale Expert Pattern had a slightly reddish tone in the lighter shades, & adjusting the contrast also affected this. To get rid of it the red gain or offset had to be turned to zero or almost zero. It was difficult to see how gain & offset affected the darker shades. As John4721 mentioned adjusting grayscale by eye is difficult to do.

I also played with the 10 point adjustments while looking at the grayscale but that's even more hopeless. I didn't have a chance last night to do any additional tweaking & will try to do tonight. I'll be heading off to Best Buy shortly to hopefully see what the new Sonys & Sharps look like.
post #24 of 31

Samsung color hue is very accurate but looks over saturated sometimes. I feel that color enhancer is active and no provision to turn it off permanently.

I have vizio that looks far more natural but honestly it looks pale here and there.

Sony and sharp might have more natural color balance. It is hard to find out before buying.

post #25 of 31
Thread Starter 
I worked with the settings last night & had the TV on the floor. These settings seemed pretty good.
Backlight - 10
Contrast - 75
Brightness - 45
Color - 36
Red Gain - 15

The brightness was determined from using the AVSHD test patterns. I could have turned down the Red Offset instead but chose to decrease Gain.

I was surprised to see some of the shadow detail in certain recordings I was using for references since this was part of the previous problem. I thought I somehow stumbled upon the magic settings.

Tonight I put the Samsung on a low table at about the same height as my old Sony. All of a sudden I can’t see the shadow detail that was there last night - until I stand up. IOW viewing while looking down at an angle gives way different results than viewing straight on. Since I was all set to watch some TV tonight I just increased the Contrast to 52 in order to make the picture watchable. However now in black scenes the edges of the screen are a bit light. It’s tolerable because the unevenness is not noticeable when actually watching a program. Unfortunately the red cast has to be re-tweaked. I should check the black level with the AVSHD disc just to see how far off it is.

The glare off the screen is also irritating. It’s sort of a semi-matte screen but I need something more matte, like my old Sony. Daylight comes in during the day which makes viewing difficult, & at night I have to turn off almost every light. I leave one on around the corner so I don’t trip on something when I get up. I feel like I’m watching TV in a cave. The glare now is more of an issue than the color or shadow detail.

I'll see what I can accomplish over the next couple days.
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by eagle_2 View Post

I just wanted to add a comment about color issues regarding accurate flesh tones. Many people aren't aware that Hollywood has been going through a phase for quite a while now regarding altering color timing for their blu-ray releases. It is fairly common now that blu-ray releases of older films go through rather extensive color-timing alterations, often going heavy on orange or teal for "mood" - and thus affecting skin tones in a way that they no longer look natural:

http://theabyssgazes.blogspot.com/2010/03/teal-and-orange-hollywood-please-stop.html

I've been noticing this for a while now, and if you read forum.blu-ray.com on a regular basis you'll notice many blu-ray releases of older catalog titles getting the teal/orange makeover. I have several blu-rays myself that are vastly different in appearance to their original theatrical releases or previously-releases DVDs. It's getting harder and harder to find films with natural skin tones because Hollywood is currently leaning towards over-stylized and hyper-saturated colors. This means just because you notice orange-tinted skin tones doesn't necessarily mean it's the tv - it could just be the color timing of the film.

Broadcast HDTV is another story altogether - it seems every channel has a different brightness or contrast or color hue. Best you can do is just adjust the tv using the tips in this thread and maybe the AVS disc or the Disney WOW disc which is excellent, and leave it at that. Personally, I have my color saturation on my F8000 turned down to around 40 for the same reason - any higher and everybody looks far too over-saturated. I like natural skin tones as well and it's hard to make that happen when everybody over-saturates everything for effect.
The other thing I have noticed especially local HDTV news programs is how the newscaster's make-up can very drastically change from Pale Ghostly to Dark Brown on a day to day basis. Not sure if there is a Professional Television Makeup Artist doing this or just the newscaster applying his or her own make-up... At times it is really funny...

I look for these things because I was a make-up artist in local and profession theater productions in the 60's...
post #27 of 31
Thread Starter 
Short story -

I had to exchange the 50" for a 46" UN46ES6150. From what I've read the 46" has the preferred TS01 panel, which I found out after the fact. It does have a wider viewing angle which I thought was good. I was using the AVS709 disc to make adjustments & noticed the gray fields were not very uniform. A lot of vertical & horizontal banding. Not real intense but sort of like slightly dimmer bands which blended into each other. IOW not sharply defined edges. But there must be about 8 pairs of vertical bands or areas going across the screen. I never noticed this with the 50" set maybe because I never played with it that much or maybe it's panel behaved better in this respect.

Anyway I thought I'd experiment doing what I think is called a 2 point white balance using the 20% & 80% gray fields. I played with the red & green offset & gain settings. As I changed these it looked like the screen was displaying red & green bands. IOW if I increase the red offset the screen does get redder, but it makes the alternate bands look greenish. This may just be a perception caused by the slight differences in brightness of the bands, but this unevenness may be the cause of why sometimes a person's face looks reddish in one area & greenish in another. It may just be a matter of one area being redder than another. That's just a thought.

Even though these bands are quite noticeable in gray fields they usually are not noticeable when looking at images. Except for some blue skies. And usually when panning. For example the sky above a tree looks a certain shade of blue but as the scene is panned the area above the tree gets a tiny bit dimmer. My wife doesn't notice this but I do.

Anyway this may be a reason why it's difficult to get good skin tones. It may be OK in one area but the unevenness changes the hue and/or saturation in another. Again just a thought.
post #28 of 31
Thread Starter 
Here’s where I ended up while using the AVS709 test patterns.

My set did exhibit some pink coloration when looking at the test patterns if the white level was too high. According to this link some sets do this. Turning the Contrast down to 75 seemed to fix that.
http://www.tlvexp.ca/tutorials/3-contrast/

I used Warm1 because Warm2 looked too warm for my preference.
Brightness at the default 45 seemed correct as did the default 50/50 Tint.
I set the Color at 35 using the RGB > Blue & one of the color test patterns.

I did the 2 point white balance using a 20% gray screen to adjust the R/G/B Offsets and an 80% gray screen to adjust the R/G/B/ Gains. This was done by eye while trying to get the gray test images to look gray. I ended up with:
R-Offset = 22, G-Offset = 20, B-Offset = 25
R-Gain = 15, G-Gain = 25, B-Gain = 25

I think initially the Backlight was at 12 but I’ve varied this & usually somewhere between 8 and 12 works for me.

I’m pretty much satisfied the way this worked out & skin tones seem good.
post #29 of 31
I just bought the 75F6300, and the image I get from the standard video option without tweaking is TERRIBLE.

All colours look great! Everything is fine and peaceful, until you see a human face... then chaos begin. Everybody looks like they have been sunbathing for hours.

Faces look too orange, extremely orange.

I have changed the settings for movie mode with the corrections specified by CNET, and faces still look orange specially in dark scenes. In outdoor scenes there is almost no problem.

I am not an expert or have any calibration training but to my untrained eye it looks bad.

I used to have an old rear projection Sony Lcos XBR2 series... I am starting to miss the little mammoth. Image looked smoother and colours were much more real, skin tones were closer to reality than the flashy orange skin tones I have now.

Any suggestions for this? Is this a panel problem or can it be corrected via calibration?
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuurbine View Post

I just bought the 75F6300, and the image I get from the standard video option without tweaking is TERRIBLE.

All colours look great! Everything is fine and peaceful, until you see a human face... then chaos begin. Everybody looks like they have been sunbathing for hours.

Faces look too orange, extremely orange.

I have changed the settings for movie mode with the corrections specified by CNET, and faces still look orange specially in dark scenes. In outdoor scenes there is almost no problem.

I am not an expert or have any calibration training but to my untrained eye it looks bad.

I used to have an old rear projection Sony Lcos XBR2 series... I am starting to miss the little mammoth. Image looked smoother and colours were much more real, skin tones were closer to reality than the flashy orange skin tones I have now.

Any suggestions for this? Is this a panel problem or can it be corrected via calibration?
Quote:
Picture Options
MENU → Picture → Picture Options → ENTER
When connecting a PC, you can only make changes to the Colour Tone.
●● Colour Tone (Cool / Standard / Warm1 / Warm2)
Warm1 or Warm2 will be deactivated when the picture mode is Dynamic.

Advanced Settings
●● Colour Space (Auto / Native): Adjust the range of colours available to create
the image.
-Set the Colour Tone to Standard or whats gives best whites.
-What is the Colour Space set now? set it to Native if it's now at Auto or viceversa, one of this setting enable the 'Wide Colour Enhancer Plus' probably the Auto cause colour blooming.
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