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the faster a HDD spins the quicker it wears out?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
the faster a HDD spins the quicker it wears out?

I'm thinking a HDD is like a tire on the car, the faster it contacts the road the quicker it wears out correct?

Lately I have been watching W7MC recorded TV at the accerated pace one click fast forward and now am concerned the HDD may wear out much quicker than if I played back at normal speed.


related ?
I have three metods of skipping commercails

1. if I know for sure the exact amount of commercials I'll use the 30 second skip function on the remote.

2.certain channels I can guesstimate the curosr move drag distances this is the quickest method.

3.plain fast forward.

So if this faster spinning HDD doe's in fact put extra wear and tear on the HDD is true then I mite have to reconcider my methods of skipping the peskie commercails.

Thanks STB
post #2 of 19
Nope, your drive spins at a continuous speed. It is the read heads that move. Think record player.
post #3 of 19
Your HDD won't wear out any faster.

In fact faster spinning hard drives are more reliable.
post #4 of 19
You shouldn't skip commercials anyway. It is like stealing from the families in the entertainment business. So now you can save not only your HDD (heads from wearing out), but help feed the children of Hollywood as well.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DotJun View Post

Nope, your drive spins at a continuous speed. It is the read heads that move. Think record player.
same ?s rephrased please substitute HDD w/ heads.

Thanks STB
post #6 of 19
...
Edited by PobjoySpecial - 5/16/13 at 2:40pm
post #7 of 19
I am basing it on real statistics in the industry that show enterprise 7200rpm and 10,000rpm hard drives last longer than 5400rpm or 5900rpm drives.

Now, of coarse some of this is due to the fact that enterprise level drives are engineered to be more durable and reliable (which is why they usually cost more). But the reality is 7200rpm or 10k drives are more reliable than 5400rpm or 5900rpm drives. My only point being that it's a silly myth with no science behind it that slower spinning hard drives will last longer.

It's a crap shoot either way with any drive you buy.

I had a 10,000rpm Raptor first generation 74GB series that came with 5year warranty. I ran 4 of them in RAID0 for 5.5 years with hard life before the first one failed. WD even swapped it out after the 5 year warranty was up. I sold them all on ebay after using them for many years.
I will never believe that slower RPM provides any real benefit. My replacement velocirators are still running strong today (the hold my MP3 collection lol ) in my desktop. I've moved to SSD years ago - but before that 10k rpm was best choice for OS drives. In which scenario they get beat up on a lot more than a simple data drive.

I've had more 5400rpm drives fail on me than 7200rpm or faster- even though I have owned far more 7200rpm+ drives.

I might not be a controlled science experiment but I think it's a hard argument to say 5400rpm drives are more reliable. Common sense says otherwise.

People buy 5400rpm drive because they are cheap and low energy- usually at the expense of reliability. They are not designed to be high endurance and reliable in serious server set ups. Perhaps the new RED line is the only exception but they are still somewhat unproven.
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'll rephrase again.

I have 5400RPM and 7200RPM this ? applies to both.

a 5400RPM is designed to playback recorded TV at X amount of speed so doe's a 7200RPM when either are increased w/ me pressing the accellerated playback one click fast forward seams to me that the mechanical parts are being used harder thus wearing out quicker.like the tire on a car.


Mfusick statment I believe is untrue
"People buy 5400rpm drive because they are cheap and low energy"


becauce I opt. for the audio video type HDD that are designed to never stop spinning.and they are'nt cheap. actualley I don't like buying anything cheap if I can buy a few steps upgraded version.

Bryan as for skipping commercials I'm a couple steps away from at least trying out videoredo so the peskie commercail will be a none issuse so hopefully I won't need to skip and can reassign the skip button on the remote for a differnt function.. so the kiddies will have to go on a diet.


"anyway from you experts opion I'm not going to worry about it. playback at the accerated speed.

Thanks Guy's STB
post #9 of 19
The drive does not change speed when you press fast forward nor does it reverse direction when you press rewind. What it does do is move the read heads faster across the platter which may increase wear on the drive.
post #10 of 19
The speed increase of playing a movie quicker doesn't add wear to the drive at all.

A movie even at fast forward speeds only requires less than 20% of a modern HDD read speed.

Hard drives can sustain 100MB + and movie playback requires about 12MB.

It's not bad for your drive at all.

Enjoy
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevethebrain View Post

a 5400RPM is designed to playback recorded TV at X amount of speed so doe's a 7200RPM when either are increased w/ me pressing the accellerated playback one click fast forward seams to me that the mechanical parts are being used harder thus wearing out quicker.like the tire on a car.
The fact that your clicking fast forward should likely be causing nothing more than the HDA actuator to increase the HDA Arm so the read/write head can read faster. Spindle shouldn't change. This is not like a car's tires. The additional speed isn't wearing on a bearing
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevethebrain View Post

anyway from you experts opinion
An expert has yet to comment in this thread smile.gif
Edited by Dark_Slayer - 5/14/13 at 6:23am
post #12 of 19
I assumed that the recording was being buffered into RAM while playing. So skipping a commercial would mostly take place in RAM. Running videoredo would actually cause more wear than just skipping.

So basically when you skip commercials you are wearing out your RAM and the skip button on your remote. I might stop skipping commercials as well so my components last 10 years instead of 9.99 years.
post #13 of 19
Lol.

I see what you did there.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

Now, of coarse some of this is due to the fact that enterprise level drives are engineered to be more durable and reliable (which is why they usually cost more). But the reality is 7200rpm or 10k drives are more reliable than 5400rpm or 5900rpm drives. My only point being that it's a silly myth with no science behind it that slower spinning hard drives will last longer.

This...

They last longer because the bearings are better and are designed for 5-year 24/7 MTBF's in mind. And, yes, you will pay out the teeth for that class of drive.

Doesn't mean they can't be quiet, either. When the Velociraptor (10,000rpm) came out, it was quieter than almost every other platter drive of the time (5,400rpm and 7,200rpm). It also had a very long lifespan, as Mfusick mentioned.

I will say that I've had more WD Green drive fail on me than any other, but that is mainly because they were installed in my WHS2001 system that is on 24/7. They just don't like that type of setup, due to the head-parking feature. I've since been running Red's without any issues of failure.

Either way, get whatever hard drive you want. Skipping commercials isn't going to wear out the drive any faster that letting it sit idle.
post #15 of 19
Well said.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevethebrain View Post

.....................................................becauce I opt. for the audio video type HDD that are designed to never stop spinning.and they are'nt cheap. actualley I don't like buying anything cheap if I can buy a few steps upgraded version...............................

I have heard (from WD) that the HDD's designed for video are actually designed for PVR's and should not be used in a desktop or server due to their general poor performance. The reason they cost a bit more is because they aren't made is such huge numbers as desktop drives.

David
post #17 of 19
Heat kills, not speed.
post #18 of 19
PVR drives are highly reliable. They are built with features like wear leveling to ensure constant operation for years. Not cheap though.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
here' the storage HDD I choose NE listed it for $150. (mite be a tad inflated) I paid. $99. free shipping.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136783

edit my Magnavox SD DVR also uses the Western Digital WD AV-GP type HDD.
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