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Official Sony [X9] XBR-55X900A / XBR-65X900A Owner's Thread - Page 110

post #3271 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by quovadis123 View Post

was sure we were both watching the same warm 2, and evidently we are not.

I am disappointed. Have I ever given you the impression that I would be happy looking at a display on which people looked like they were ready to vomit? How could I continue to rave about the quality of the X900 if I was looking at a distorted color palette? Really?
post #3272 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post
 

 

This is a good "bundle" that will allow you to calibrate your display:  http://store.spectracal.com/consumer/calman5-bundles/spectracal-c3-with-calman-5-basic.html

 

Of course, you need a laptop to run the software.  The "Basic" CalMAN version is a good starting place, and likely everything you will ever need.  However, there are no-penalty software upgrade options if you want more advanced capabilities.  So far, I am still using Basic, and it meets my needs.

Great bundle i'm sure, but only if i could see their web page it would help...

post #3273 of 7162
post #3274 of 7162

Wow !!!

 

Calman basic is $149...

 

It's a hefty sum to pay, but if people's skin tones look more healthy in the warm 2 department, it may be worth it.

post #3275 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by quovadis123 View Post

Wow !!!

Calman basic is $149...

It's a hefty sum to pay, but if people's skin tones look more healthy in the warm 2 department, it may be worth it.

You will need a colorimeter as well. CalMAN Basic plus an entry-level colorimeter is $249. Considering that a professional calibration costs at least $500, and that you will probably use the CalMAN solution more than once, it is a reasonable price.

Aren't you the same person who is considering the Sony 80" 4K display? $250 is a pretty good investment to get a $25,000 TV properly calibrated, no?
post #3276 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post


You will need a colorimeter as well. CalMAN Basic plus an entry-level colorimeter is $249. Considering that a professional calibration costs at least $500, and that you will probably use the CalMAN solution more than once, it is a reasonable price.

Aren't you the same person who is considering the Sony 80" 4K display? $250 is a pretty good investment to get a $25,000 TV properly calibrated, no?

No

I saw the 84" and I was not that impressed over the 65"

I am now looking into their new 4k projector VLP 1100. Apparently the quality is amazing and you can have a 211" screen size.

post #3277 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by quovadis123 View Post

No
I saw the 84" and I was not that impressed over the 65"
I am now looking into their new 4k projector VLP 1100. Apparently the quality is amazing and you can have a 211" screen size.

Before you jump into the world of projection, you need to do A LOT of research. Not trying to pile on here, but if you don't know the difference between changing settings and professional calibration, maybe a $28K projector is a little overkill? I stupidly made the mistake of "jumping in" about 8 years ago and made so many mistakes. My setup was terrible, as was my planning. If I would have done the proper research, I would have saved myself thousands.

Just from your post, I can already tell you that your expectations are unrealistic. For example, as an owner of the 1000ES (which for all intents and purposes is almost exactly like the 1100, just minus the HDMI 2.0 upgrade, which is $2,500), I can tell you that a 211" screen is not realistic. Only a select few screens would give a bright enough image for it to be enjoyable, and those that would produce an acceptable image would be very prone to hotspotting-- are you ready to deal with that? And if you don't go with a high gain, are you prepared to replace the $1,000 bulb every 400 hours? And forget about 3D on a screen that size. I have a 124" screen and I could use more brightness. I can barely even get enough brightness for 3D.

From your posts on this thread, I can tell you like a punchy image. Keep in mind that projection setups yield a fraction of the brightness of a TV set (sometimes as low as 25%, sometimes even lower).

Before I purchased my 1000ES, I did hundreds of hours of research. Literally hundreds. With the MSRP of the 1100 nearing $30K, you'll be very, very, very disappointed if you don't do your research. It's a versatile projector, but going into it with unrealistic expectations will make you regret your purchase very quickly.

Why don't you start with an entry-level projector and make your mistakes with that? I guarantee you'll learn much more from that than with cutting your teeth on a projector that's as much as a BMW.
Edited by BrianMundt - 10/31/13 at 9:50pm
post #3278 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianMundt View Post

Before you jump into the world of projection, you need to do A LOT of research. Not trying to pile on here, but if you don't know the difference between changing settings and professional calibration, maybe a $28K projector is a little overkill? I stupidly made the mistake of "jumping in" about 8 years ago and made so many mistakes. My setup was terrible, as was my planning. If I would have done the proper research, I would have saved myself thousands.

Just from your post, I can already tell you that your expectations are unrealistic. For example, as an owner of the 1000ES (which for all intents and purposes is almost exactly like the 1100, just minus the HDMI 2.0 upgrade, which is $2,500), I can tell you that a 211" screen is not realistic. Only a select few screens would give a bright enough image for it to be enjoyable, and those that would produce an acceptable image would be very prone to hotspotting-- are you ready to deal with that? And if you don't go with a high gain, are you prepared to replace the $1,000 bulb every 400 hours? And forget about 3D on a screen that size. I have a 124" screen and I could use more brightness. I can barely even get enough brightness for 3D.

From your posts on this thread, I can tell you like a punchy image. Keep in mind that projection setups yield a fraction of the brightness of a TV set (sometimes as low as 25%, sometimes even lower).

Before I purchased my 1000ES, I did hundreds of hours of research. Literally hundreds. With the MSRP of the 1100 nearing $30K, you'll be very, very, very disappointed if you don't do your research. It's a versatile projector, but going into it with unrealistic expectations will make you regret your purchase very quickly.

Why don't you start with an entry-level projector and make your mistakes with that? I guarantee you'll learn much more from that than with cutting your teeth on a projector that's as much as a BMW.

I dont agree! I spent only few hours researching the 1000ES and bought it. I am more than satisfied with my purchase and am really looking forward to the upgrade. I have a 144 inch screen and I think it looks spectacular. I cant wait to hookup the fmp-x1 to it and check out the Life Cycle movie.

I suggest for you to see it in a store somewhere first hand! I didnt even see it to be honest but knew I wanted the best so I bought it. I extremely happy with my purchase.
post #3279 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abbas View Post

I dont agree! I spent only few hours researching the 1000ES and bought it. I am more than satisfied with my purchase and am really looking forward to the upgrade. I have a 144 inch screen and I think it looks spectacular. I cant wait to hookup the fmp-x1 to it and check out the Life Cycle movie.

I suggest for you to see it in a store somewhere first hand! I didnt even see it to be honest but knew I wanted the best so I bought it. I extremely happy with my purchase.

You misunderstood me (my fault-- I didn't explain that properly). I'm not saying the decision to buy a VW1000ES is a hard one. I love mine, and really, it's one of the best projectors out there. Every time I turn it on, I need to pick my jaw up off the floor.

I wasn't saying that I researched the VW1000ES for hundreds of hours, but rather all other aspects of my setup, as well as what technology was coming in the next few years. I also spent a lot of that time planning my home theater remodel as well. I made the decision on the VW1000ES in a matter of hours, just like you (hell, I was sold the day Sony announced it!!!).

What I'm trying to say is that someone with literally no home theater experience shouldn't just dive in to a high-end projection without research and a basic understanding of how things work, especially when you're talking about a $25K projector. You probably had a pretty good foundation of knowledge, as did I, when we made that decision. You know how screen gain impacts brightness, how much brightness is required for 3D, proper placement and throw distance, the difference between passive and active 3D, etc. We take that knowledge for granted. To us, it seems like common sense, but to someone with no understanding of how things work, that's a massive amount of information to get your head around.

TVs are basically "plug and play." I think you can admit that a good projection setup is not that intuitive. Treating it like a TV purchase isn't the best way to go about it. The key is planning. You can get a decent setup without planning, but you can get an incredible setup with some forethought.

I don't know how closely you've been following this thread, but Quovadis has admitted he has very little home theater knowledge, which is perfectly fine. We all start somewhere! But imagine your disappointment if you purchased a 211" screen with a .85 gain (EN4K, for example, which I'm using in my setup) and a $25K projector, set it up, and realized that it's way too dim to be enjoyable and that 3D was out of the question, when all along you thought the image would be as bright as an LED TV! Man, that would be brutal.

For someone like Quovadis who doesn't have that basic knowledge, it's very important to do research before diving in-- not just research on the VW1000ES, but about projection in general. I agree with you about checking out the projector beforehand. I didn't have that luxury either, but if you have the option, definitely take it.
Edited by BrianMundt - 11/1/13 at 1:26am
post #3280 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Entering settings is not the same as calibrating. If you go back and read my posts, I have always said that certain settings vary from panel to panel. White balance, for example, is very important for establishing correct RGB balance and gray scale. White balance settings can vary, and can only be properly set by a meter and test patterns (or someone with an exceptional eye). So, if you simply copy my White balance settings, or someone else's, you could end up with incorrect settings for your panel. This in turn could cause the various color temperature settings to produce different results.

I don't think you need to be overly concerned, Set your display how you like it. If you still don't think it is correct, have it professionally calibrated. Let's move on.

I agree, but the differences from panel to panel at the end can't be drastic.. there can be a little difference, but the results are the same, more or less. No?
however I think that the problem doesn't exist. if you like those settings and calibration, use it. If you don't like them, change them. we are free, fortunately! but there's no discussion: those are the most accurate and professional settings. 

post #3281 of 7162
CONVERT ALERT:

As I posted months ago, shortly after getting the 65/900, I preferred settings that made the picture a bit warmer than average, and a lot warmer than SONY's heavily bizarre default (vividish) shipped settings.

I had recently mentioned an issue with video blooming on fade ups from black on many programs.

Years ago on the 25" XBR tube, Sony called their warm/cool settings "Trinitone" and offered the word TINT in one of three flavors in the on-screen display, one blueish, one pinkish and one whiteish. I always left it on white since the other two made the picture look odd.

Last night while trying to find a solution to this video blooming, I fully plugged in Austin Jerry's most current settings (Cinema1 and Warm 2) and found the problem was corrected. I went down the list and changed other elements and my reaction again was just not clicking with my eye.

We then went outside for 2 hours for Halloween on our street. When I got in around 10, I turned on the TV and sat with the Warm 2 settings for the rest of the evening.

I like it. I needed to make an effort to get accustomed to the deeper, warmer image and it seems to work for me.

(I did do some very modest changes here and there.)

The comparison I can make has to do with laundry. If you wash whites in detergent, they come out clean, but if you add bleach, they come out whiter. I was adding the "bleach" to my settings but have backed off and am enjoying the results.
post #3282 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianMundt View Post


You misunderstood me (my fault-- I didn't explain that properly). I'm not saying the decision to buy a VW1000ES is a hard one. I love mine, and really, it's one of the best projectors out there. Every time I turn it on, I need to pick my jaw up off the floor.

I wasn't saying that I researched the VW1000ES for hundreds of hours, but rather all other aspects of my setup, as well as what technology was coming in the next few years. I also spent a lot of that time planning my home theater remodel as well. I made the decision on the VW1000ES in a matter of hours, just like you (hell, I was sold the day Sony announced it!!!).

What I'm trying to say is that someone with literally no home theater experience shouldn't just dive in to a high-end projection without research and a basic understanding of how things work, especially when you're talking about a $25K projector. You probably had a pretty good foundation of knowledge, as did I, when we made that decision. You know how screen gain impacts brightness, how much brightness is required for 3D, proper placement and throw distance, the difference between passive and active 3D, etc. We take that knowledge for granted. To us, it seems like common sense, but to someone with no understanding of how things work, that's a massive amount of information to get your head around.

TVs are basically "plug and play." I think you can admit that a good projection setup is not that intuitive. Treating it like a TV purchase isn't the best way to go about it. The key is planning. You can get a decent setup without planning, but you can get an incredible setup with some forethought.

I don't know how closely you've been following this thread, but Quovadis has admitted he has very little home theater knowledge, which is perfectly fine. We all start somewhere! But imagine your disappointment if you purchased a 211" screen with a .85 gain (EN4K, for example, which I'm using in my setup) and a $25K projector, set it up, and realized that it's way too dim to be enjoyable and that 3D was out of the question, when all along you thought the image would be as bright as an LED TV! Man, that would be brutal.

For someone like Quovadis who doesn't have that basic knowledge, it's very important to do research before diving in-- not just research on the VW1000ES, but about projection in general. I agree with you about checking out the projector beforehand. I didn't have that luxury either, but if you have the option, definitely take it.

I agree

I have zero knowledge in the TV and projector department.

In fact, the Sony 65" is my first REAL tv,,all the others were cheap $1500 plasmas.

It was only when i saw the sony the first time, that I realized that quality was really important, and that there truly was a difference in quality between tv's. I had never noticed this before.

I will definitely scrutinize this projector carefully.

Thank you for warning me. 

Are all projectors dim?

What about a smaller screen? Would it be brighter? I can settle for 100 inches!

I love the 65" but I do not feel we are immersed enough at 10~12 feet away.

post #3283 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeSoFl View Post

CONVERT ALERT:

As I posted months ago, shortly after getting the 65/900, I preferred settings that made the picture a bit warmer than average, and a lot warmer than SONY's heavily bizarre default (vividish) shipped settings.

I had recently mentioned an issue with video blooming on fade ups from black on many programs.

Years ago on the 25" XBR tube, Sony called their warm/cool settings "Trinitone" and offered the word TINT in one of three flavors in the on-screen display, one blueish, one pinkish and one whiteish. I always left it on white since the other two made the picture look odd.

Last night while trying to find a solution to this video blooming, I fully plugged in Austin Jerry's most current settings (Cinema1 and Warm 2) and found the problem was corrected. I went down the list and changed other elements and my reaction again was just not clicking with my eye.

We then went outside for 2 hours for Halloween on our street. When I got in around 10, I turned on the TV and sat with the Warm 2 settings for the rest of the evening.

I like it. I needed to make an effort to get accustomed to the deeper, warmer image and it seems to work for me.

(I did do some very modest changes here and there.)

The comparison I can make has to do with laundry. If you wash whites in detergent, they come out clean, but if you add bleach, they come out whiter. I was adding the "bleach" to my settings but have backed off and am enjoying the results.

Good man. We're used to viewing images that have so much blue in them that when it comes to a warmer colour balance it can look far too yellow at first glance, which is exactly what folks are describing. But give it time, and all will become clear...
post #3284 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoff D View Post

Good man. We're used to viewing images that have so much blue in them that when it comes to a warmer colour balance it can look far too yellow at first glance, which is exactly what folks are describing. But give it time, and all will become clear...

I found last night that warm2 did not seem yellow if you don't flip between them during a bright scene. I actually put AJ's new settings in while on my Media Center desktop and then watched the Bane fight scene on Dark Knight rises. It looked great.

That will have to hold me over until I can get my own basic kit as I've been doing more spending than usual lately and "congress" (my wife) likely won't approve of the light meter stuff smile.gif
post #3285 of 7162
Interesting discussion here about the color settings...I always use the calibrated mode for movies but do switch for certain types of content to the more "blue" vivid look, for hockey games for instance, i just prefer the ice bright white like that. One way I really notice what the "Vivid" and "Standard" picture settings on TV's do to the colors is when viewing my own photos on the TV...photos that I spent time post processing and getting the colors and look exactly how I want it...just try one of those on a TV's dynamic modes and see how much they are really messing with color (dynamic range is all lost, dark areas too dark to see any details, highlights blown out, etc)...just hooking up my laptop on its desktop screen (mac) already shows a huge difference, in the calibrated mode it looks like the proper colors as it does on my laptop screen.
post #3286 of 7162
But did you calibrate your laptop screen? I kid, I kid...
post #3287 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by quovadis123 View Post
 

I THINK IM GOING NUTS !!!

 

JERRY....

 

When you give us the long lists of numbers to plug into our tv, in settings and advanced settings...turning things on, and off etc...IS THIS NOT CALIBRATING OUR TV'S?

 

Are you saying we need a professional to come to our tv's to calibrate the tv, before we plug in your settings?

 

I'm totally confused now.

 

I thought that you had calibrated your tv, with specialized equipment, and you give us the results so we can do the same.

 

It doesn't, unfortunately, work like that. If it was that straightforward the manufacturers would just program those settings into every screen before it left the factory. The first problem is manufacturing tolerances. These are consumer grade displays and (relatively for what they are) inexpensive, so they are built to 'tolerances'. Each set is going ti be different to each other, so long as it is within the tolerances Sony laid down during production. One set at one extreme of the tolerance range can be quite different to another set at the other extreme.  There is the added complication that, with calibration of displays, many of the settings interact with many other settings, requiring some 'back and forth' adjustments to get them all to play well together. And all of these settings at the factory will also have a tolerance range.

 

The other important point to remember is that a display is calibrated for the room it is used in, and for a certain set of environmental conditions. If you usually watch with the lights on, and I usually watch with the lights off, for example, then we will need very different settings in order to reach the proper 'standard' of REC709 or D65 etc. Similarly, many people do two calibrations - one for night and one for day, and store these in different memories. A display used in a darkened room will require calibration to an entirely different foot-lambert brightness setting when compared with the same display used in a room with bright lighting, or dimmed lighting and so on.

 

The bottom line is that Jerry has calibrated his individual display for his individual room and his individual viewing environment. Yours will, of necessity, be different. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that the chances of Jerry's settings actually giving you a worse picture quality are higher than those of giving you a better PQ. IMO you'd be better off buying a good calibration disc such as the S&M one and using that to set the display up 'by eye' rather than copying someone else's settings. If you are careful in the way you use a setup disc, and follow the instructions carefully, you can get a long way to a very good PQ indeed. A full calibration will always be better of course and you will have objective measurements and graphs to support the calibration and remove any subjectivity.

post #3288 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by quovadis123 View Post
 

I'm using your settings...that's the problem.

Maybe my warm 2 is different?

 

Sharing someone else's settings can be problematic, although I would not characterize my settings as a "problem".  There are differences among panels, although I would not have suspected such a significant difference.  I guarantee that Warm2 on my set is very close to 6500, and that the settings I posted produce a PQ that is no where near what you described.  The colors are very accurate.

 

Perhaps someone else can share what they are experiencing WRT their color settings and PQ?

 

Jerry, you have it right. Quo has some problem with his image quality clearly, but he has not calibrated his display AIUI. He has simply plugged in your settings. This is almost guaranteed never to work very well due to the reasons I mentioned in my earlier post just now. If all that was required is that one dude calibrates his display and then everyone else uses those settings, the calibration business would be finished overnight. 

 

Whatever Quo is seeing is simply a result of his uncalibrated display. He'd be better just using a S&M test disc and doing it by eye.

post #3289 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianMundt View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by quovadis123 View Post

No
I saw the 84" and I was not that impressed over the 65"
I am now looking into their new 4k projector VLP 1100. Apparently the quality is amazing and you can have a 211" screen size.

Before you jump into the world of projection, you need to do A LOT of research. Not trying to pile on here, but if you don't know the difference between changing settings and professional calibration, maybe a $28K projector is a little overkill? I stupidly made the mistake of "jumping in" about 8 years ago and made so many mistakes. My setup was terrible, as was my planning. If I would have done the proper research, I would have saved myself thousands.

Just from your post, I can already tell you that your expectations are unrealistic. For example, as an owner of the 1000ES (which for all intents and purposes is almost exactly like the 1100, just minus the HDMI 2.0 upgrade, which is $2,500), I can tell you that a 211" screen is not realistic. Only a select few screens would give a bright enough image for it to be enjoyable, and those that would produce an acceptable image would be very prone to hotspotting-- are you ready to deal with that? And if you don't go with a high gain, are you prepared to replace the $1,000 bulb every 400 hours? And forget about 3D on a screen that size. I have a 124" screen and I could use more brightness. I can barely even get enough brightness for 3D.

From your posts on this thread, I can tell you like a punchy image. Keep in mind that projection setups yield a fraction of the brightness of a TV set (sometimes as low as 25%, sometimes even lower).

Before I purchased my 1000ES, I did hundreds of hours of research. Literally hundreds. With the MSRP of the 1100 nearing $30K, you'll be very, very, very disappointed if you don't do your research. It's a versatile projector, but going into it with unrealistic expectations will make you regret your purchase very quickly.

Why don't you start with an entry-level projector and make your mistakes with that? I guarantee you'll learn much more from that than with cutting your teeth on a projector that's as much as a BMW.

 

Absolutely the voice of reason. +1 +1 +1. The BenQ w1070 is a single chip DLP that is very bright, has a full CMS, does superb 3D using triple flash and gives very little away to other PJs costing several times more, with the exception of black levels. But it costs less than $1,000. It is an ideal 'first timer' PJ as it does give a really superb PQ and can be calibrated too, so it's an ideal PJ for someone who also wants to learn about calibration as well as about PJs. It would be sheer lunacy for someone to spend $28k on a 'first time' PJ, especially when that person has already demonstrated a lack of understanding of the fundamentals (no disrespect intended). The comment about a 211 inch screen is evidence enough of that on its own.

post #3290 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Absolutely the voice of reason. +1 +1 +1. The BenQ w1070 is a single chip DLP that is very bright, has a full CMS, does superb 3D using triple flash and gives very little away to other PJs costing several times more, with the exception of black levels. But it costs less than $1,000. It is an ideal 'first timer' PJ as it does give a really superb PQ and can be calibrated too, so it's an ideal PJ for someone who also wants to learn about calibration as well as about PJs. It would be sheer lunacy for someone to spend $28k on a 'first time' PJ, especially when that person has already demonstrated a lack of understanding of the fundamentals (no disrespect intended). The comment about a 211 inch screen is evidence enough of that on its own.

The BenQ is a terrific recommendation. I've heard only great things and it's been reviewed very highly. For the price, it's hard to beat!
post #3291 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianMundt View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Absolutely the voice of reason. +1 +1 +1. The BenQ w1070 is a single chip DLP that is very bright, has a full CMS, does superb 3D using triple flash and gives very little away to other PJs costing several times more, with the exception of black levels. But it costs less than $1,000. It is an ideal 'first timer' PJ as it does give a really superb PQ and can be calibrated too, so it's an ideal PJ for someone who also wants to learn about calibration as well as about PJs. It would be sheer lunacy for someone to spend $28k on a 'first time' PJ, especially when that person has already demonstrated a lack of understanding of the fundamentals (no disrespect intended). The comment about a 211 inch screen is evidence enough of that on its own.

The BenQ is a terrific recommendation. I've heard only great things and it's been reviewed very highly. For the price, it's hard to beat!

 

It's a terrific 'first timer' PJ - it really is. A great PJ to 'learn PJs' on. How do I know?  I was that man.... :)

post #3292 of 7162

These last few posts have been invaluable. 

 

I understand this is a tad off topic, however, I had no clue that the SCREEN for the projector was the most important thing. Thanks to Brian, who told me to get a really good screen, and a cheaper projector. By cheaper, I mean medium level.

 

I did not even know the screen was sold separately.

 

So BenQ projector? and a really good screen like the EN4K screen.

 

BenQ are a Chinese brand of computer monitors...this is getting really interesting.

 

ARE THE BULBS SOLD SEPARATELY? ANY thing else I should know? 

 

Obviously, the home theater is not included...but I know that !!

post #3293 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by quovadis123 View Post
 

These last few posts have been invaluable. 

 

I understand this is a tad off topic, however, I had no clue that the SCREEN for the projector was the most important thing. Thanks to Brian, who told me to get a really good screen, and a cheaper projector. By cheaper, I mean medium level.

 

I did not even know the screen was sold separately.

 

So BenQ projector? and a really good screen like the EN4K screen.

 

BenQ are a Chinese brand of computer monitors...this is getting really interesting.

 

ARE THE BULBS SOLD SEPARATELY? ANY thing else I should know? 

 

Obviously, the home theater is not included...but I know that !!

 

There is an active thread on here for the BenQ w1070 - check it out for a lot of good info.  All PJs come with at least one lamp - they last for varying lengths of time depending how they are used - Eco mode, for example, is kinder on the lamp than 'Normal' mode. Which mode you use depends on how bright the PJ is and how bright the image is in your room, which will depend on throw distance etc. Before you buy a PJ it is essential to understand throw distances and the relationship between that and screen size. We are way off topic here so I will stop now. A good place to learn about all this is in the BenQ thread where there is a good balance of first-timers and experienced users. As Brian said, a PJ has a far greater learning curve than a TV display.

post #3294 of 7162
Does anyone know what the latest update does it doesn't say on the sony website.

Is this the HDMI 2.0 update?
post #3295 of 7162

Has anyone compared the regular W900 sony to our 4k model?

 

It has a triluminous display and is 240hz...any difference in PQ?

post #3296 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasjw View Post

Does anyone know what the latest update does it doesn't say on the sony website.

Is this the HDMI 2.0 update?

What update? My X900 says no newer version of firmware is available. I have version PKG3.901AAA. You are seeing a newer version?
post #3297 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

What update? My X900 says no newer version of firmware is available. I have version PKG3.901AAA. You are seeing a newer version?

That is the newest from a few days ago. Sony firmware site doesn't show what it's about yet.
post #3298 of 7162
"Rolling out out a series of six test videos this week without much fanfare, Netflix has started testing 4K resolution through the Netflix Instant streaming video platform. Anyone with access to a 4K television and a Netflix Instant subscription should be able to access the video. Titled El Fuente, each of the six videos contain the same 8-minutes of footage, but recorded at different fps rates. The six videos have been recorded at 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 50 and 59.94 frames per second. The 4K videos can also be viewed on standard high definition televisions, but likely down-scaled to 1080p or 720p resolution."

Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-theater/netflix-starts-testing-4k-content-batch-public-videos/#ixzz2jVr8UJkn
post #3299 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecamp View Post

"Rolling out out a series of six test videos this week without much fanfare, Netflix has started testing 4K resolution through the Netflix Instant streaming video platform. Anyone with access to a 4K television and a Netflix Instant subscription should be able to access the video. Titled El Fuente, each of the six videos contain the same 8-minutes of footage, but recorded at different fps rates. The six videos have been recorded at 24, 25, 29.97, 30, 50 and 59.94 frames per second. The 4K videos can also be viewed on standard high definition televisions, but likely down-scaled to 1080p or 720p resolution."

Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-theater/netflix-starts-testing-4k-content-batch-public-videos/#ixzz2jVr8UJkn

Wow! This really works. I am playing the 30fps right now, and the PQ is stunning. While there isn't any way to get an on-screen verification, it certainly looks Ultra HD 4K.

Anyone else try it yet?
post #3300 of 7162
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Wow! This really works. I am playing the 30fps right now, and the PQ is stunning. While there isn't any way to get an on-screen verification, it certainly looks Ultra HD 4K.

Anyone else try it yet?

I just tried it on my 55x900a and it looked amazing. It took a few seconds to get all the way up in resolution but it looked like it was 4k (or damn close). I think netflix in general looks much better on the set then when I come through my tivo, appletv or other devices.
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