or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Ultra Hi-End HT Gear ($20,000+) › Spec an Audiophile PC With Me Using CAPS 3.0 as a Starting Point, Adding HDMI for Multi-Channel Hi Rez Audio!!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Spec an Audiophile PC With Me Using CAPS 3.0 as a Starting Point, Adding HDMI for Multi-Channel... - Page 11

post #301 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Bruzonsky View Post

Nope! Believe it or not, don't have time, interest, money to try everything out there!@@ Even Edorr can't try everything - and he tried a good amount more stuff than me!

Also, I tend to "try" stuff that can readily be resold if I don't like it (I hardly ever do 30 day trials). A boutique piece assembled in a garage like the Beatis (or music vault) does not meet that criteria and you most likely end up taking a huge hit if you end up not liking it (or just decide to go in a different direction).
post #302 of 639
They took a wire off the Hanrun part to avoid the breakout cable... easily done. Of course they had to then adjust the impedance of the SPDIF from the card to produce the AES/EBU connection.
post #303 of 639
Have any of you more knowledgeable folks considered the exaSound dac ?
post #304 of 639
Thread Starter 
The following is from my posts at the Theta Digital ongoing thread, regarding my use of JRiver Media Center, now Version 19,
with my Theta CB3 HD SSP:


If my memory is any good, if you set the Options in JRiver to output the source channels, and play stereo music, then the CB3 HD, if set to say DPL2x or DTSNeo6, will play it as multichannel.

However, you will find that JRiver's expansion of channels from 2, to say 5.1, sounds really good. Set JRiver Options to
say 5.1 channels, play stereo, and JRiver will expand to 5.1 channels in the same audio res for all channels!

In my system, once I added the Berkeley Alpha USB Converter, I find myself listening to stereo - in stereo via the Gen VIII DAC only, as I have previously explained. But pre-Berkeley, I had thought that even over HDMI stereo sounded great, and usually even better having JRiver expand the channels.

_____________________________

OK. I just did some more music over HDMI, to experiment re expanding 2 channel.

If you set JRiver to ouput source channels AND not to expand to subwoofer or more channels - then with CB3 HD set to DPL2X or DTSNeo6, you will get sound out of only the front left and right and subs, no center, no surrounds, no sub. with CB3 HD display shows the audio mode its set to.

If you set JRiver to ouput 2 channels no sub, then with CB3 set to DPL2X or DTSNeo6, CB3 HD display shows the audio mode its set to.and you get front left and right and subs only, no center, no surrounds.

If you set JRiver to ouput 2.1 channels with sub, CB3 HD shows multi-channel PCM and plays front left and right and sub..


If you set JRiver to output 5.1 with sub, CBe HD shows multi-channel PCM and plays all 5.1 channels including subs, and sounds excellent!


Bottom line is you want to use JRiver, not CB3 HD, to expand channels from 2 to 5.1, if you want to accomplish this - because CB3 HD's DPL2x and DTSNeo6 modes, for whatever reason, do not expand to include the surrounds.
post #305 of 639
Thanks again for checking all that. I'm setting it up this weekend and it will be fun biggrin.gif
post #306 of 639
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 777BigAnt777 View Post

Thanks again for checking all that. I'm setting it up this weekend and it will be fun biggrin.gif
What are you using for your media server
post #307 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Bruzonsky View Post

What are you using for your media server

I'm like where you were earlier this year. Just a simple laptop with all junk removed by a local PC tech guy. Using JRiver and Gizmo to control everything.

Wanted to test the waters before ordering a full-blown media or audio server. So far the sound is just fantastic - blows away any transport I've heard.

BTW I agree with your findings posted earlier about using using internal HD or USB external HD, etc. I know it's hard for some to believe, including me, but that's the facts ma'am.

When our hearing is conflicting with measurements, we need to collectively:

1. Take a deep breath, have a seat, have a shot, etc.

2. Find new things to measure that correlate with what we hear.

Our brains are much finer devices than microphones or oscilloscopes. However I digress and preach to the choir...

I've asked the "powers that be" at JRiver to update the Gizmo app to control dsp studio, but it's not on anyone's priority except nuts like us methinks smile.gif

I was asking any and all about the Baetis because:

1. their engineering looks sound (pun intended!)

2. they use JRiver for media control, library, etc.

3. their upgrade policy and support appear great

4. I've talked with John over there who really takes music seriously

Of course all of this is moot if they go out of business, but, hey, that can happen to anyone. rolleyes.gif
post #308 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by 777BigAnt777 View Post

I was asking any and all about the Baetis because:

1. their engineering looks sound (pun intended!)

2. they use JRiver for media control, library, etc.

3. their upgrade policy and support appear great

4. I've talked with John over there who really takes music seriously

Of course all of this is moot if they go out of business, but, hey, that can happen to anyone. rolleyes.gif

Not necessarily a bad idea. You probably pay a little premium, but I asked smallgreen to assemble a machine, some components did not work and I was basically left hanging out to dry with no recourse. Won't happen if you buy from this guy.
post #309 of 639
Thread Starter 
When you buy a custom built and designed PC like Baetis, you get the hard drive inside the media server.

Small Green Computer advised that the media server will have less noise, and better sonics, by only having a minimal solid state drive inside, with the music on a NAS; and by using a remote iPad and.or laptop/PC for media server control.

So once I got my custom media server - a modded CAPS 3.0 Zuma - I initially hooked up a LCD monitor and a keyboard and mouse.However, I also set up my Toshiba laptop, and also my iPad3, using the free Teamviewer program, for remote control of the media server. I might initially use the LCD monitor/keyboard/mouse hooked up the media server, and then I'd simply turn the LCD monitor off and do it all remotely. I also use JRemote with the iPad3, too.

I recently took out the LCD monitor/keyboard/mouse so that my media server is operated completely "headless"! No problems doing this at all. My recent left eye partial cornea replacement and finally new glasses have improved my vision so that I am doing better now with the smaller 15" laptop and 10" iPad3 than before. Did this impact my sonics? I didn't do direct AB comparison and if there was any sonic improvement it wasn't anything that really stands out to me. However, technically, the less electrical noise, potentially the better the sonics, although I can't say I've heard an improvement from this.

Next step - a NAS. Andrew at Small Green Computer recommended a Synology 1513+, with Western Digital Red hard drives, for my needs. Western Digital Red hard drives come in 1, 2, 3 and just recently 4 TB hard drives. I was waiting for the 4 TB to come available, now they are available. I have about 3 TB used on my 4 TB eSATA drive currently connected to my media server.

But before I spend the $$, I thought, how about using my home office Dell 8500XPS PC, a powerhouse with quad i7, 12 GB RAM, etc as my network server. I connected a duplicate 4 TB USB drive, with my music, to the Dell PC (USB 3.0). Took a few hours of playing to get the networking working between the media server and the USB 3.0 drive connected to the Dell PC. And - WOW! As I played some classical, jazz, vocal, rock - I immediately could hear the sonic improvements. Particulary the dynamic slam of certain recordings, like the ripped SACD ISO of Shelby Lynn's 2008 "Just a Little Lovin". However, on the higher resolution 192-24 and ripped SACD ISO stuff, I sometimes found too long of a lag time in pressing the button and music, or interruptions. I think that could be predictable, as I have the USB 3.0 drive hooked up to another PC, the Dell, which has not been optimized for use with music. So hopefully getting the SYnology 1513+ will alleviate this concern. Another concern is that as I run the JRiver 19 "Import" function, both to insert the album covers and to analyze the audio, the process is very very slow compared to when I used the 4 TB eSATA drive connected direct to the Media Server. My current
networking uses Apple Airport Express "n" coupled with Monster Cable powerline adapters, as my home is very, very large, three floors, with a very extended main floor. I may need to move to the newer "AC" networking - but I won't know for sure until I get the Synology up and running. But my experiment makes it clear the sonic improvement by going wireless vs wired for the music drive. And those even more expensive custom designed premade media servers like the Baetis all have their music drives internal - extra electrical noise which per my demo I am convinced degrades the sonics.
post #310 of 639
I'm sorry but I find it rather difficult to believe that the difference between running an internal SSD versus NAS is "WOW!" unless something is very wrong with the way the SSD is running/powered. My audio server has the operating system on an mSATA card on the board and my music library is on an SSD within the server. I have powered this SSD independently of the motherboard with it's own 1A pcb. It's one of these with a few modifications. (If interested, on page 7 of this you will see the circuit diagramme. Because my module is fed clean DC power the bridge rectifier diode setup, D1-D4, can be simplified. I also swapped out the trim potentiometer for one that would make it easier to tune the module to 5V. That took about 10 minutes for a novice. The LM317 is quite a nice, high quality component. I bolt the LM317 to the bottom of my case as a heat sink. So nice clean 12V in, clean 5V out to power the SSD. Cost? About £9.) Because JRiver is set to bring the entire track into memory before playback the only possible way the SSD could degrade quality is if it is improperly powered.
post #311 of 639
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevekale View Post

I'm sorry but I find it rather difficult to believe that the difference between running an internal SSD versus NAS is "WOW!" unless something is very wrong with the way the SSD is running/powered. My audio server has the operating system on an mSATA card on the board and my music library is on an SSD within the server. I have powered this SSD independently of the motherboard with it's own 1A pcb. It's one of these with a few modifications. (If interested, on page 7 of this you will see the circuit diagramme. Because my module is fed clean DC power the bridge rectifier diode setup, D1-D4, can be simplified. I also swapped out the trim potentiometer for one that would make it easier to tune the module to 5V. That took about 10 minutes for a novice. The LM317 is quite a nice, high quality component. I bolt the LM317 to the bottom of my case as a heat sink. So nice clean 12V in, clean 5V out to power the SSD. Cost? About £9.) Because JRiver is set to bring the entire track into memory before playback the only possible way the SSD could degrade quality is if it is improperly powered.

My media server is powered by a PS Audio P5 power regenerator. However, I have not done a separate power to the SOTM USB card.

I can only relate that having the music on a remote hard drive/NAS wirelessly has clearly increased the dynamics and improved the sonics with my media server in my system - Andrew at Small Green Computer told me at the start of my project this was the way to go, that it should have a resultant less electrical noise and better sound.
post #312 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by 777BigAnt777 View Post

I'm like where you were earlier this year. Just a simple laptop with all junk removed by a local PC tech guy. Using JRiver and Gizmo to control everything.

Wanted to test the waters before ordering a full-blown media or audio server. So far the sound is just fantastic - blows away any transport I've heard.

BTW I agree with your findings posted earlier about using using internal HD or USB external HD, etc. I know it's hard for some to believe, including me, but that's the facts ma'am.

When our hearing is conflicting with measurements, we need to collectively:

1. Take a deep breath, have a seat, have a shot, etc.

2. Find new things to measure that correlate with what we hear.

Our brains are much finer devices than microphones or oscilloscopes. However I digress and preach to the choir...

I've asked the "powers that be" at JRiver to update the Gizmo app to control dsp studio, but it's not on anyone's priority except nuts like us methinks smile.gif

I was asking any and all about the Baetis because:

1. their engineering looks sound (pun intended!)

2. they use JRiver for media control, library, etc.

3. their upgrade policy and support appear great

4. I've talked with John over there who really takes music seriously

Of course all of this is moot if they go out of business, but, hey, that can happen to anyone. rolleyes.gif
They make the claim that their SDPIF out is superior to the USB approach. If that is true, it saves a great deal of money because of the expense of external USB to SPDIF converters. I noticed that he is using a Berkeley Alpha dac. Has he compared the Berkeley Alpha USB to his SPDIF out?
Edited by Bulldogger - 10/27/13 at 4:53pm
post #313 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Bruzonsky View Post

When you buy a custom built and designed PC like Baetis, you get the hard drive inside the media server.

From the Baetis website:

"All media storage drives are external, via 8 USB ports (2 USB3.0 ports in rear; 2 in front), along with unlimited NAS. The Revolution comes with one 2T USB3.0 external drive to get the audiophile started. External storage minimizes EMI, provides for easier replacement, and lowers mechanical noise."

I've never heard their stuff, I just got intrigued by their perfectionism about 2 years ago and was happily surprised to see them still around and (looks like) doing well.

This is one area of audio I know little about, but it's so amazing!
post #314 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogger View Post

They make the claim that their SDPIF out is superior to the USB approach. If that is true, it saves a great deal of money because of the expense of external USB to SPDIF converters. I noticed that he is using a Berkeley Alpha dac. Has he compared the Berkeley Alpha USB to his SPDIF out?

I can say that SPDIF out of mine sounds awesome. As you know, I have fitted a Fidelity Audio Micro Clock 2 to replace the crappy crystals on the Juli@ card. It is powered directly from the clean 12V rail I made up. Easy, peasy (except for removing the old crystals which a pain in the proverbial because of the way they are attached - for a skilled operator it would only take 5 minutes). The SKC crystals on the Juli@ card have a frequency tolerance of +- 10 to 50 ppm versus the Micro Clock crystal +- 1 ppm. While the clock costs about the same as the Juli@ card, the upgrade is well worth it.
Edited by stevekale - 10/28/13 at 4:52am
post #315 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Bruzonsky View Post

My media server is powered by a PS Audio P5 power regenerator. However, I have not done a separate power to the SOTM USB card.

I can only relate that having the music on a remote hard drive/NAS wirelessly has clearly increased the dynamics and improved the sonics with my media server in my system - Andrew at Small Green Computer told me at the start of my project this was the way to go, that it should have a resultant less electrical noise and better sound.

The P5 has little to do with it. Sure it cleans up the AC but then you've still got the conversion to DC and all the issues related to that. If I recall correctly, you are using a switching power supply unit. This will likely be throwing a lot of junk back at the P5. I have my gear running off an Isotek GII Titan with a Polaris as an extension hub for the low current items. For this reason I intentionally do not plug the power supply of my audio server into this hub but run it completely separately.

There is a group of thought that having the data operating on the same USB bus as the SoTM USB card is not a good idea. Quite why I do not understand. If you were running a plugged in USB drive and the SoTM card perhaps you are experiencing this. For now I have chosen to run a greatly improved version of the Juli@ PCIe card (as Bryston should have done) rather than USB so I do not encounter this problem.
Edited by stevekale - 10/28/13 at 4:19am
post #316 of 639
FWIW here are the components of my server

Motherboard: ASRock Z87E-ITX This board has a number of advantages - it has an mSATA slot for a card to contain the OS and applications leaving the SSD for music only making changing the data SSD easy; it has a full ATX power supply slot which is conveniently located so as to not obstruct any cooling pipes; it has PCIe; it runs the latest Haswell processors from Intel

Processor: Intel Haswell 4570T (very low TDP) This barely wakes up to run JRiver. It runs about 74% UNDERclocked.

RAM: Crucial Ballistix Sport

Power supply: 18V external switching brick. The 18V is then cleaned to very low ripple 12V via the following components point to point wired with Kimber Kable: 2 x 22,000 uF Fidelity Audio SI capacitors, a Fidelity Audio SPower HC regulator, and 1 x 22,000uF Fidelity Audio SI capacitor. This 12V rail feeds (1) the Fidelity Audio Micro 2 clock on the Juli@, the PicoPSU, the 5V rail (see below) for the SSD power.

SSD Power Rail: A modified Velleman 1A power supply to take low noise 12V to 5V for the SSD (the PicoPSU does not power the SSD)

Sound Card: ESI Juli@ XTe with Fidelity Audio Micro Clock 2 replacing the card's existing clocks and a jumper cable wired to a Cardas Audio RCA jack to avoid the breakout cable

All of the above is pretty easy to put together. If you can solder two wires together you can assemble the power supply components. My next step is to add a choke filter to the incoming 18V and ultimately to add a toroidal transformer and 4 x diode in bridge rectifier configuration to avoid the external brick altogether, and perhaps a better case as I hate the finish on the Streacom.

No it's not a complex multi-rail ATX PSU but my bet is that it gets you c90% of the benefits. To go to the next step of multi rail you need to manage the Power On delays required by the ATX power supply and so, in addition to the 5V and 3.3V rails (which wouldn't be hard but obviously require additional capacitors and regulators), there's a reasonable amount of complexity added. If anyone wants me to point them to an elegant solution of how this can be done, just shout.

Yes, the SPower regulator is about 60x the cost of a very good component like an LM317 but its quality is in a different league. (Brent from Fidelity Audio, understandably, thinks it much better than Paul Hynes's regulators.) Does the better regulator lead to audible differences? I've no idea. And, yes, there are considerably cheaper capacitors available. Also, on the capacitor setup there are many ways to skin the cat - I simply followed Brent's advice here.
Edited by stevekale - 10/28/13 at 4:54am
post #317 of 639
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevekale View Post

The P5 has little to do with it. Sure it cleans up the AC but then you've still got the conversion to DC and all the issues related to that. If I recall correctly, you are using a switching power supply unit. This will likely be throwing a lot of junk back at the P5. I have my gear running off an Isotek GII Titan with a Polaris as an extension hub for the low current items. For this reason I intentionally do not plug the power supply of my audio server into this hub but run it completely separately.

There is a group of thought that having the data operating on the same USB bus as the SoTM USB card is not a good idea. Quite why I do not understand. If you were running a plugged in USB drive and the SoTM card perhaps you are experiencing this. For now I have chosen to run a greatly improved version of the Juli@ PCIe card (as Bryston should have done) rather than USB so I do not encounter this problem.

NO - I've been using a 4 TB eSATA drive plugged into my media server. However, I have all the music also on a backup USB 3.0
4 TB drive, andf right now for my networking experiment I've got that USB drive plugged into my home office Dell 8500XPS, networked to my custom media server way to the east and down to my dedicated home theater room.
post #318 of 639
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevekale View Post

FWIW here are the components of my server

Motherboard: ASRock Z87E-ITX This board has a number of advantages - it has an mSATA slot for a card to contain the OS and applications leaving the SSD for music only making changing the data SSD easy; it has a full ATX power supply slot which is conveniently located so as to not obstruct any cooling pipes; it has PCIe; it runs the latest Haswell processors from Intel

Processor: Intel Haswell 4570T (very low TDP) This barely wakes up to run JRiver. It runs about 74% UNDERclocked.

RAM: Crucial Ballistix Sport

Power supply: 18V external switching brick. The 18V is then cleaned to very low ripple 12V via the following components point to point wired with Kimber Kable: 2 x 22,000 uF Fidelity Audio SI capacitors, a Fidelity Audio SPower HC regulator, and 1 x 22,000uF Fidelity Audio SI capacitor. This 12V rail feeds (1) the Fidelity Audio Micro 2 clock on the Juli@, the PicoPSU, the 5V rail (see below) for the SSD power.

SSD Power Rail: A modified Velleman 1A power supply to take low noise 12V to 5V for the SSD (the PicoPSU does not power the SSD)

Sound Card: ESI Juli@ XTe with Fidelity Audio Micro Clock 2 replacing the card's existing clocks and a jumper cable wired to a Cardas Audio RCA jack to avoid the breakout cable

All of the above is pretty easy to put together. If you can solder two wires together you can assemble the power supply components. My next step is to add a choke filter to the incoming 18V and ultimately to add a toroidal transformer and 4 x diode in bridge rectifier configuration to avoid the external brick altogether, and perhaps a better case as I hate the finish on the Streacom.

No it's not a complex multi-rail ATX PSU but my bet is that it gets you c90% of the benefits. To go to the next step of multi rail you need to manage the Power On delays required by the ATX power supply and so, in addition to the 5V and 3.3V rails (which wouldn't be hard but obviously require additional capacitors and regulators), there's a reasonable amount of complexity added. If anyone wants me to point them to an elegant solution of how this can be done, just shout.

Yes, the SPower regulator is about 60x the cost of a very good component like an LM317 but its quality is in a different league. (Brent from Fidelity Audio, understandably, thinks it much better than Paul Hynes's regulators.) Does the better regulator lead to audible differences? I've no idea. And, yes, there are considerably cheaper capacitors available. Also, on the capacitor setup there are many ways to skin the cat - I simply followed Brent's advice here.


I forgot - what components are you using to listen to music with your server? I assume you have a Theta Casablanca III HD with Extreme DACs since you post over at the Theta Digital thread - is that what you are using for your preamp & DACs?
post #319 of 639
Yes (see signature)
post #320 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogger View Post

[Baetis] makes the claim that their SDPIF out is superior to the USB approach. If that is true, it saves a great deal of money because of the expense of external USB to SPDIF converters. I noticed that he is using a Berkeley Alpha dac. Has he compared the Berkeley Alpha USB to his SPDIF out?

Full disclosure: In addition to being a Legacy Audio dealer, I am also an authorized Baetis Audio dealer. I also own a Baetis Revolution media server, and have used it almost exclusively in my system (vs. my Oppo 105) since I got it. The flexibility and convenience of having all my high resolution music and blu-ray movies at my fingertips on the Baetis, along with its terrific audio/video quality at a reasonable price is hard to beat.

Yes, John at Baetis has done extensive listening tests to the Baetis' SPDIF out vs. USB, and he very much prefers the SPDIF output, which is basicaly hardwired to its own header right off the motherboard, and heavily shielded from EMI as well. Of course, you can still use the USB output if you think it sounds better, or if your DAC is USB-only. Baetis dealers will work with you to set up your Baetis server for the best performance with your particular gear.

John also highly recommends the Berkeley Alpha DAC, if you have the funds to afford it. :-)
Edited by DMark1 - 10/28/13 at 11:27am
post #321 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevekale View Post

FWIW here are the components of my server

[

Power supply: 18V external switching brick. The 18V is then cleaned to very low ripple 12V via the following components point to point wired with Kimber Kable: 2 x 22,000 uF Fidelity Audio SI capacitors, a Fidelity Audio SPower HC regulator, and 1 x 22,000uF Fidelity Audio SI capacitor. This 12V rail feeds (1) the Fidelity Audio Micro 2 clock on the Juli@, the PicoPSU, the 5V rail (see below) for the SSD power.

SSD Power Rail: A modified Velleman 1A power supply to take low noise 12V to 5V for the SSD (the PicoPSU does not power the SSD)


Yes, the SPower regulator is about 60x the cost of a very good component like an LM317 but its quality is in a different league. (Brent from Fidelity Audio, understandably, thinks it much better than Paul Hynes's regulators.) Does the better regulator lead to audible differences? I've no idea. And, yes, there are considerably cheaper capacitors available. Also, on the capacitor setup there are many ways to skin the cat - I simply followed Brent's advice here.

You need to keep the analog section on clean DC. The clock source will also benefit from quiet DC. Beyond that, it really makes little if no difference. For example there is no relation to the power feeding the SSD and audio quality, provided of course the data does not have errors. And if it does, the result will be clicks and pops, not noise, distortion, or altered frequency response.

Of course going way overkill on the power supply won't hurt anything either.

Above all, the best configuration IMO, is to run the server or digital side AES or SPDIF out into a high quality external DAC. This keeps the bulk of the digital RFI/EMI out of the analog audio path.
post #322 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by 777BigAnt777 View Post

From the Baetis website:

"All media storage drives are external, via 8 USB ports (2 USB3.0 ports in rear; 2 in front), along with unlimited NAS. The Revolution comes with one 2T USB3.0 external drive to get the audiophile started. External storage minimizes EMI, provides for easier replacement, and lowers mechanical noise."

I've never heard their stuff, I just got intrigued by their perfectionism about 2 years ago and was happily surprised to see them still around and (looks like) doing well.

This is one area of audio I know little about, but it's so amazing!

The Baetis Revolution 2 (the latest model) comes with the 2TB external hard drive, as well as an internal 128GB solid-state drive. The internal SS drive has the operating system on it (Windows 7), and is also recommended to be used when ripping Bluray discs, as it is faster than ripping directly to the external drive. Ripping a Bluray movie takes about 45 minutes with the SS drive. Once ripped, you make any file naming changes to the file that you want to, then just cut and paste the file (.mkv) over to your movie file on the external drive, which takes about 10 minutes. Then, the original file on the SS drive can be deleted to free up space for the next Bluray rip.

CDs can be ripped directly to the external drive, and take approx. 7 minutes each. Full length DVD movies take about 20 minutes to rip.
post #323 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMark1 View Post


Yes, John at Baetis has done extensive listening tests to the Baetis' SPDIF out vs. USB, and he very much prefers the SPDIF output, which is basicaly hardwired to its own header right off the motherboard, and heavily shielded from EMI as well. Of course, you can still use the USB output if you think it sounds better, or if your DAC is USB-only. Baetis dealers will work with you to set up your Baetis server for the best performance with your particular gear.

In theory USB has less jitter as the data is packetized and heavily buffered. SPDIF is realtime raw digital audio and here timing is far more important. That said, there are very good SPDIF implementations and poor USB implementations.

The primary audiophile benefit of USB is it's isolation of system clocks between the DSP sections and the DAC.
post #324 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glimmie View Post

You need to keep the analog section on clean DC. The clock source will also benefit from quiet DC. Beyond that, it really makes little if no difference. For example there is no relation to the power feeding the SSD and audio quality, provided of course the data does not have errors. And if it does, the result will be clicks and pops, not noise, distortion, or altered frequency response.

Of course going way overkill on the power supply won't hurt anything either.

Above all, the best configuration IMO, is to run the server or digital side AES or SPDIF out into a high quality external DAC. This keeps the bulk of the digital RFI/EMI out of the analog audio path.


Err…mine is an all digital device. It has no analogue section.

That is why I have (a) upgraded the clocks (b) fed them clean 12V DC.

Re power to the SSD, I suspect you are right in so far as the power isn't polluting the rest of the device. Others have stronger views to the contrary. It was a fun and easy project to power the SSD independently though.

You can see what DAC I have in my signature.
post #325 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glimmie View Post

In theory USB has less jitter as the data is packetized and heavily buffered. SPDIF is realtime raw digital audio and here timing is far more important. That said, there are very good SPDIF implementations and poor USB implementations.

The primary audiophile benefit of USB is it's isolation of system clocks between the DSP sections and the DAC.

But it's weakness is lack of galvanic isolation.

You are commenting as if your audience has no experience in this matter...
post #326 of 639
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevekale View Post

Yes (see signature)


Egglestonworks Andra III, Andra III Centre, Rosa (as surround). Rel Stentor II. Theta Casablanca III HD (ver 4.31). Krell FPB 200 and two KAV 150a amplifiers. Oppo 103EU with Jaehong Lee linear power supply. Apple TV. Pioneer PDP-LX608D. Synergistic Research "Element Copper" front speaker cable.

Do you have the Extreme DACs for your front left and right channels? Are these the DAC that you are using with your media server?
post #327 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevekale View Post

But it's weakness is lack of galvanic isolation.

You are commenting as if your audience has no experience in this matter...

But SPDIF is not typically transformer isolated either in consumer gear. AES-3, the professional unbalanced standard, is usually transformer coupled yet still not isolated because the coax is still chassis grounded. Only AES-1992 over 110ohm twisted pair is a truly isolated digital audio interface.
post #328 of 639
With the Juli@ card it is isolated
post #329 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Bruzonsky View Post

Do you have the Extreme DACs for your front left and right channels? Are these the DAC that you are using with your media server?

I run my audio server into my CB III HD (either via coaxial SPDIF or HDMI). I have two Xtreme DACs in my CB.
post #330 of 639
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevekale View Post

With the Juli@ card it is isolated

Is the RCA or BNC connector bonded to the chassis? If so, then it's not truly isolated. This is a common problem in esoteric audio gear. Fortunatly with digital signals, it really makes no difference.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ultra Hi-End HT Gear ($20,000+)
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Ultra Hi-End HT Gear ($20,000+) › Spec an Audiophile PC With Me Using CAPS 3.0 as a Starting Point, Adding HDMI for Multi-Channel Hi Rez Audio!!!