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Wireless bandwidth requirement for 24/96 streaming over DLNA

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I am getting sound skips when playing 24/96 FLAC audio from PC to AVR on a wireless DLNA connection (. I am thinking that it's my wireless network not fast enough because I get no problem when playing regular MP3 files.

Does anyone know how fast the wireless network needs to be in order to play 24/96 losslessly over DLNA? Would it need to be even faster if I want to play multichannel files such as FLAC 5.1?
post #2 of 11
Full uncompressed 16bit/44.1kHz is 16 (bits) x 44100 (samples per second) x 2 (channels) = 1.41Mbps

Using the same formula:

24 x 96000 x 2 = 4.61Mbps

There may be some overhead over DLNA, not entirely sure.

If you have a wireless N connection, depending on complexity of network and/or interference you should be getting at least 80 Mbps in your network. Do you think in your situation there may be some transcoding that would cause the skipping?
post #3 of 11
Latentcy, error checking, dropouts and retries, interference/noise, PC/AVR buffereing issues, etc. can make streaming audio/video over wireless a nightmare. Are people routinely getting it to work OK (I do not know)? I always figured if I added network hookups to my system I'd install a local hard drive and just use the network to transfer files, then stream from the local drive.

There are undoutedly a myriad of threads on it, I just haven't read any, curious if this is a common problem or not since if and when I hook into the network it will be wireless.
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
My AVR has a USB interface to play FLAC but only in 2ch. I figured the only way I can play 5.1 without getting another hardware would be to use my PC. And, since my PC is in a different room, hence I need to use DLNA over wireless.

Now, because my PC and AVR are both connected on wireless, I assume they can't transmmit at the same time to the wireless router. That would mean whatever speed they get from the wireless router would be halved, correct? So, for example, if I am getting 30Mbps on my wireless router, then the effective speed between my PC and AVR would be less than 15Mpbs.

And for 5 channel 24/96, the bandwidth would have to be more than 24 x 9600 x 5 = 11.4Mbps? Doubling that would be 23Mbps, which would be the minimum effective speed I would need.

I use jRiver and configured it to "never convert", so I assume there is no transcoding issue.

p.s. I have wireless-N and I wish I know how I can measure my wireless speed.
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by soniky View Post


Now, because my PC and AVR are both connected on wireless, I assume they can't transmmit at the same time to the wireless router. That would mean whatever speed they get from the wireless router would be halved, correct? So, for example, if I am getting 30Mbps on my wireless router, then the effective speed between my PC and AVR would be less than 15Mpbs.


Well, not exactly. Only one client can access the wireless frequency at any given time so multiple clients wait in line (the line is very, very short!), but this doesn't affect the transmission speed. In your case there is only one device sending data, it gets all available bandwidth.

Quote:
p.s. I have wireless-N and I wish I know how I can measure my wireless speed.

What router do you have? How many other wireless clients are on the network? You shouldn't have any problems transferring this amount of data across the network. It may be a buffering issue at the AVR, it may require some analysis and optimization of the network (sometimes all it takes is moving the wireless router).

LAN Speed Test is a pretty good program to check out. I haven't used it in years, I presume it's overcome its gigabit ethernet limitations.
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi Nethawk, thanks for the reply. As you said, because the router can only transmit or receive one device at a time, it means that the same amount of data would have to get transmitted twice (first from PC to router, and then router to AVR) so the speed has to be at least doubled in order to complete that double transmission within the same amount of time. Or, do you mean the data can be transmitted directly from PC to AVR without going through the router?

Maybe there is something else wrong. My router is netgear n600 wndr37AV. I'll look into lan speed test. Thanks for your suggestion.
post #7 of 11
Everything goes through the router, but this doesn't halve the available bandwidth.

That's a capable router. You should focus a bit of attention on optimizing your wireless network. There are many references on the internet, do a search and some reading, it's not difficult and could be a fun experience for you. In a nutshell, first look at placement. Then use a wireless scanner to determine the channels available. There are many tools for this, or you can use the Cisco Meraki website (Google it). The goal is to select an available channel with the most separation between other channels - the one off by itself is the one you want. This will eliminate as much as possible interference from other equipment. If you're in an apartment building the channel graph is likely to be lively. Once you've done this configure the netgear with the desired channel (the default is auto). Also give your router a different SSID than the default, make it unique. Most other settings should be optimal already, just in case make sure 20/40MHZ channel width is set (40 is optimal, 20 is for legacy equipment). You may need to experiment with different channels, this requires a bit of patience, but most often the one by itself will work best. Moving the router may be necessary to gain more separation, especially in apartment buildings. Last, which I don't recommend, you can boost output power. This often requires hacking and/or a different firmware. Another change you can experiment with is turning off SSID broadcast and make sure everything can still connect. Again if living in a rural area, if SSID is broadcast neighbors devices can see this, and even if WEP or WPA are used (and you should use them) other equipment may try to connect, which can seriously affect performance.

You have capable equipment and should be able to do what you want. However there are multiple factors at play, and sometimes the only recourse is to revert to wired. I stream high bandwidth content with ease, but then my nearest neighbor is a third of a mile away and my network is optimized.

Geek out and have fun smile.gif Please report back.
Edited by Nethawk - 5/25/13 at 2:57am
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
nethawk, Just tried Lan Speed Test. When I take my laptop to 1 M away from the router and test to a shared folder on the PC, I get 20Mbps. When I repeat the same test with the laptop at the AVR location, I get 19Mbps. The same test with laptop at the PC location only gets me 15Mbps. All devices use wireless N and it's a sad speed I get. It's probably time for me to upgrade the firmware on the router (haven't done it since bought it) and see if it helps. Then I'll try different things as you mentioned. THanks!
post #9 of 11
11.5 Mbps is about right for 5ch of 24/96 not counting packet overhead or encryption. A15Mbps wireless connectioon is probably not enough, especially if there is anything creating interference that causes dropped/corrupted packets that need to be resent. Firmware updates are unlikely to make much difference. Get wired.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Yah, wire would be my last but best resort. But it's gonna be very difficult because of walls and high ceiling.Thanks for the reply.
post #11 of 11
You should be getting significantly more throughput than that. I'm guessing you have serious interference from a neighbor router. Firmware update is often a good thing but not likely to make a lot of difference in your case.

Is your network encrypted? Any chance of a neighbor using your connection?

Worst case, use a USB drive and try the DLNA server built into the Netgear.
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