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4000 lumen Sony Laser projector VPL-FHZ55 - Page 2

post #31 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark haflich View Post

I will differ with you re making the fabric disappear with a 2.4.

I have the 2.8
post #32 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by noah katz View Post

I have the 2.8

I had a 2.8 but sold it since I wanted to go larger, and by then only the 2.4 was available. However I think the 2.4 is smoother and more 'disappearing' even than my 2.8.

I would really like to see it side-by-side with a SnoMat, though Mark H, who has seen (and installed) them says that the SnoMat is smoother and more transparent. I cannot attest to this but will defer to his opinion.
post #33 of 79
I will be purchasing a 2.4 for 3D viewing only but that purchase will have to wait until our present house is sold and we relocate from MD to FL. The sony with the Snomat is just not bright enough for me in 3D. Watchable?.... Yes. guests have no complaints it being about equal to 3D in a commercial theater.
post #34 of 79
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by space2001 View Post

Sony will also be showing off there 4k OLED at Infocomm

I'll be checking them out for sure. Seems like there are quite a bit of companies showing off their hybrid projectors this year. Should be interesting.
post #35 of 79
"5 year collect, repair and return service for main projector unit."

Wow looks like Sony is really letting the public test Laser's out. 5 year collect, repair, return, worry free i'd do it.
post #36 of 79
Quote:
....I guess I'm just addicted to the more dynamic pic that the HP affords.)

Sorry, I'm new here and trying to get info on projectors. Could someone please tell me what HP is?

Thanks!
post #37 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post

Sorry, I'm new here and trying to get info on projectors. Could someone please tell me what HP is?

Thanks!

Horse Power biggrin.gif

They are talking about a screen material called high power. It's a high gain screen.
post #38 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post

Sorry, I'm new here and trying to get info on projectors. Could someone please tell me what HP is?

Thanks!

HP is an abbreviation of High Power, a screen material Da-Lite makes. You may also see HCHP, which is High Contrast High Power, and has a slightly darker substrate.

They are favorites here on the forum due to their high gain which allows a brighter image from putting the projector in low lamp mode or when it has weak brightness output to begin with.

And some just like a really bright image, like a plasma.
post #39 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by biliam1982 View Post

HP is an abbreviation of High Power, a screen material Da-Lite makes. You may also see HCHP, which is High Contrast High Power, and has a slightly darker substrate.

They are favorites here on the forum due to their high gain which allows a brighter image from putting the projector in low lamp mode or when it has weak brightness output to begin with.

And some just like a really bright image, like a plasma.

Thanks for the explanation. Do these HP screens make black less black?

In the little bit of research I've done, I'm looking at buying an Epson 5020 or 6020 to use in my light controlled room, but sometimes, like having people over for a day game, I might choose to NOT completely darken the room while using the projector.

So, if I'm using that projector in a light controlled room, is there a reason I would need a HP screen? What are the gains of a "HP" screen? 1.3? 2.4? 2.8?
post #40 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetmeat View Post

Thanks for the explanation. Do these HP screens make black less black?

In the little bit of research I've done, I'm looking at buying an Epson 5020 or 6020 to use in my light controlled room, but sometimes, like having people over for a day game, I might choose to NOT completely darken the room while using the projector.

So, if I'm using that projector in a light controlled room, is there a reason I would need a HP screen? What are the gains of a "HP" screen? 1.3? 2.4? 2.8?

There's more factors to consider for the HP screens. Viewing angles can be a major consideration. Generally you need to mount it a close eye level as possible. So if you ceiling mount it, you may not get the full benefits of it's high gain.

The HP and HCHP are both 2.4 gain material. The older HP was 2.8 but is no longer in production and can only be found for sale used.

They will raise the black level floor. Meaning, theoretically, if your projector's black level is .002, it will now be .0048, which can be noticeable.

There are still benefits to having a high gain screen, even in a light controlled room. Though the projector you're considering has a lot of lumens, you could put it in eco mode and save the bulb life and it will take longer before you have to replace it. If you're going w/ a large screen, it will still help lighting it up in ambient light and also after the bulb starts dimming.

So we don't derail this thread further, there's lots of threads and info on them in the screens forum that you should check out. You should post there w/ more specifics on your room/setup to get a more detailed response and help for your situation.
post #41 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by biliam1982 View Post

They will raise the black level floor. Meaning, theoretically, if your projector's black level is .002, it will now be .0048, which can be noticeable.

This is no more a disadvantage than a brighter pj with the same CR (contrast ratio).

This and much more has been discussed ad nauseum; check the screen forum.

Don't despair at the volume of info; it starts to repeat.
post #42 of 79
I saw it at InfoComm today. Price is about $1500 more than the lamp based model it's built from ($7K vs. $5.5K). Laser has 20K hours of life and I was told the life of the phosphor is longer than the laser diode. Color temp for the rated 4,000 lumens is not yet spec'ed but I was told that was with a approx. a 9,000 deg. Kelvin value, so lower if calibrated for 6500K (Sony rep didn't know how much lower lumens). I'm posting info and pics on my blog at Projector Reviews.
post #43 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Jones View Post

I saw it at InfoComm today. Price is about $1500 more than the lamp based model it's built from ($7K vs. $5.5K). Laser has 20K hours of life and I was told the life of the phosphor is longer than the laser diode. Color temp for the rated 4,000 lumens is not yet spec'ed but I was told that was with a approx. a 9,000 deg. Kelvin value, so lower if calibrated for 6500K (Sony rep didn't know how much lower lumens). I'm posting info and pics on my blog at Projector Reviews.

Ok, how do I get to your blog?confused.gif link please.
post #44 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Bley View Post

Ok, how do I get to your blog?confused.gif link please.

LMGTFY... biggrin.gif

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=RON+JONES+BLOG+PROJECTOR+REVIEWS
post #45 of 79
Not everybody has signatures turned on to see the name of his blog.
post #46 of 79
Blog is HERE. AVS Forum powers that be won't allow the link in my signature line.

I've now posted info from day 2 at InfoComm -- Some interesting DLP projector info included. Also I talked to a couple more Sony reps today who confirmed Sony is looking to put their white laser technology into more projector models. Perhaps more info on this at CEDIA..



.
Edited by Ron Jones - 6/13/13 at 2:32pm
post #47 of 79
Hi,

in Great Britain, the price is 6 999 GBP and it would be available in august :

http://www.projectorshop24.co.uk/sony-projector/sony-vpl-fhz55/
post #48 of 79
All the connections at the front? How unusual and how very unpractical!
post #49 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark_H View Post

All the connections at the front? How unusual and how very unpractical!

This was mentioned before somewhere, but it's a business projector and it makes sense to have them in front, connecting to the source, or just to hide it from the viewing audience.
post #50 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlanzy View Post

any idea if a 4k OLED would  get up to our projection screen sizes in technology as well as price in the foreseeable future so we don't need pjs anymore?

I believe not very far with Flexible OLED
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/OLED-Flexible-SID-2013-LG-Display-Oxide-TFT,22658.html
imagine a 120" rollable OLED that can be mounted like 120" projector screen ...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OvTLg4i2_U
the video from 2010

and the future is laser projection like ( Augmented Reality ) or what ever works better with portable devices display
laser does better color depth and contrast ( even higher then +8000 contras where normal lamp left off at 3500 or 5000 at max ) plus free focus and sharper image biggrin.gif

have a look at xbox one IllumiRoom
http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=episodic&v=3l29fcTQqlY

or about Oculus Rift 1080p ( this is no projection device ) but do we need a projector at this piont !!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSboqL82fmw
Edited by yyy484 - 6/22/13 at 6:04am
post #51 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by yyy484 View Post


I believe not very far with Flexible OLED
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/OLED-Flexible-SID-2013-LG-Display-Oxide-TFT,22658.html
imagine a 120" rollable OLED that can be mounted like 120" projector screen ...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OvTLg4i2_U
the video from 2010

 

 

Kinda reminds me of the first televisions that were smaller than 10", hopefully it won't take as long for flex OLED to get to >100" .

post #52 of 79
I come from the world of widescreen projection using multiple projectors, often requiring high lumen output. As you may know, high lumen mercury lamp life is quite short, the projectors are outrageously heavy, unbelievably expensive, usually cannot be turned on their side into portrait mode, and often require a 220 outlet to run them. So I've kept my eyes open for something that would take their place. Not sure if this Sony VPL-FHZ55 is it, but, at bare minimum, it sure looks like it might be at least the father of what I hope for.

The most appealing thing to me is the relatively simple concept, eliminating LED. And if whatever it is that is providing the 4000 lumens can be increased in intensity, then it seems to me that we may have high lumen laser projectors soon. When Sony says of this projector, "This changes everything", I'm thinking that they may well be right!
post #53 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by LloydSt View Post

I come from the world of widescreen projection using multiple projectors, often requiring high lumen output. As you may know, high lumen mercury lamp life is quite short, the projectors are outrageously heavy, unbelievably expensive, usually cannot be turned on their side into portrait mode, and often require a 220 outlet to run them. So I've kept my eyes open for something that would take their place. Not sure if this Sony VPL-FHZ55 is it, but, at bare minimum, it sure looks like it might be at least the father of what I hope for.

The most appealing thing to me is the relatively simple concept, eliminating LED. And if whatever it is that is providing the 4000 lumens can be increased in intensity, then it seems to me that we may have high lumen laser projectors soon. When Sony says of this projector, "This changes everything", I'm thinking that they may well be right!

Sony has High Lumen Laser output already. Unfortunately it can not be sold do to the mandate that no laser light source can go above a certain lumen(i think it is 5000). Once this mandate get lifted you will see higher lumen projectors.
post #54 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by space2001 View Post

Sony has High Lumen Laser output already. Unfortunately it can not be sold do to the mandate that no laser light source can go above a certain lumen(i think it is 5000). Once this mandate get lifted you will see higher lumen projectors.

Thanks space2001! I was wondering why lampless laser projectors weren't being produced. You appear to be ahead of the so-called "experts" who write of these things in various trade journals. They've reported that lampless projectors seem to be stuck at about the 3,500-4,000 lumen range, but they've never said why (that I've seen), though generally they are reporting on laser/led hybrids. Plus, though that blue laser is the source of the light in the Sony, after the phosphor, lens, mirrors, prism, and yet another lens, one wonders if what is finally projected can truly be called "laser light" such that it would present any safety hazard. But I just create my shows and don't really know/understand the physics of it all.

Still, since Sony seems to want to be pushing this technology, perhaps that lends a stronger voice to the effort. But I wouldn't be too surprised to find that the big names in high lumen, mercury lamp projectors, namely Christie, Barco, Panasonic, Eiki, Digital Projection, projectiondesign, and others aren't too keen on lower priced, high lumen,. long lasting projectors replacing their projectors costing 10's of thousands or even higher! But even they seem to be finally moving in the direction of laser, sometimes producing their own.

I'm trying to stay optimistic that I'll see high lumen laser before I die!
post #55 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by LloydSt View Post

Thanks space2001! I was wondering why lampless laser projectors weren't being produced. You appear to be ahead of the so-called "experts" who write of these things in various trade journals. They've reported that lampless projectors seem to be stuck at about the 3,500-4,000 lumen range, but they've never said why (that I've seen), though generally they are reporting on laser/led hybrids. Plus, though that blue laser is the source of the light in the Sony, after the phosphor, lens, mirrors, prism, and yet another lens, one wonders if what is finally projected can truly be called "laser light" such that it would present any safety hazard. But I just create my shows and don't really know/understand the physics of it all.

Still, since Sony seems to want to be pushing this technology, perhaps that lends a stronger voice to the effort. But I wouldn't be too surprised to find that the big names in high lumen, mercury lamp projectors, namely Christie, Barco, Panasonic, Eiki, Digital Projection, projectiondesign, and others aren't too keen on lower priced, high lumen,. long lasting projectors replacing their projectors costing 10's of thousands or even higher! But even they seem to be finally moving in the direction of laser, sometimes producing their own.

I'm trying to stay optimistic that I'll see high lumen laser before I die!

Most of the company's you mentioned are in the projection business not the lamp business. They have to keep a majority of bulbs in stock\being produced for at least minimum for 6 years(I don't remember if it 6 or 7). This cost to maintain for any manufacturer is high since there is chance someone will need a bulb. Every time there is a new projector design there is a chance it will housing a new bulb.

Most of this is in the business/commercial sector, but trickles down to consumer.
post #56 of 79
The blue laser in the Sony does not reach the screen. It lights nothing other than a spinning phosphor wheel which emits white light similar to how a UHP lamp emits white light although with different spectral aspects. The white light from the wheel is focused by an optical lens element or lens elements and the rest of the light engine or block is pretty much the same as in a bulb lit projector. The laser is a low power class 2 laser which is not affected by the need to get an exemption from the present ban by the FDA. The laser light from a class 2 laser really cannot damage ones eyes or skin though using optical devices to view the laser beam could be damaging. The beam is not visable to the viewer when the laser is in operation but would be viewable to s repair person. The eyes blink response makes a class 2 laser pretty much safe.

THE FDA issued an exemption to Kodak for the laser projector it licensed to IMAX but stated it would not issue further exemptions until an industry consensus was reach as to safety considerations and the regulations governing high powered lasers used in optical applications were revised. The industry consensus process is well under way but a proposed new rule is away off.
post #57 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by space2001 View Post

Most of the company's you mentioned are in the projection business not the lamp business. They have to keep a majority of bulbs in stock\being produced for at least minimum for 6 years(I don't remember if it 6 or 7). This cost to maintain for any manufacturer is high since there is chance someone will need a bulb. Every time there is a new projector design there is a chance it will housing a new bulb.

Most of this is in the business/commercial sector, but trickles down to consumer.

Federal regulations requires manufacturers above a certain size doing business in the US to maintain spare parts for products sold for at least 7 years.
post #58 of 79
My Test sample just arrived, review will be this week online :


post #59 of 79
120" OLED?

Only after 2020 !
post #60 of 79
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