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Theater For Hobbits 2.0 - Mini 2.35 CIH Build in a 10x10 Alcove - Page 2

post #31 of 133
Thread Starter 
Superchunks in the rear columns under construction.



6 mil vapor barrier membrane bonded to the rock wool. Ethan Winer and co seem to recommend this approach to gain a little more low frequency absorption and lessen the room deadening effect. Sure, why not - it's just half a can of Super 77.



Primer on the ceiling! Starting to look theater-ish now.

post #32 of 133
Thread Starter 
Thanks David. Crown is up on the soffits:



With the rope light clipped to the tray behind it:



The final ceiling color is more of a neutral gray than black, but it is very flat and does a fair job of not reflecting. The soffits, which are much closer to the screen and light path, will be flat black.

4 5" cans in the upper ceiling, the front 2 in gimbals that double up as the screen wash. 6 accent 3" cans in the soffit will illuminate the fabric panels, and act as task lighting over the seating areas. Then the light tray on top of those. All Insteon controllers. Pretty flexible for a 10x12 space.
post #33 of 133
Thread Starter 
I got tired of taking photos and posting, and just wanted to get 'er done. So fast forward a month:

*

And then another two weeks:

*


It's nowhere near as impressive as most rooms here, and there was far less drama than my last build. But it's neat, tidy, and most importantly, working! biggrin.gif

Stuff I learned or noticed:

  • With careful attention to flanking, two extra layers of drywall + GG worked magic on the party wall. It took 6 weeks to cure, but transfer went from "I can just make out explosions from my neighbor's system" to zero. Since the assembly is supposed to work even better when it's on the source side, I'm pretty confident that I'm not disturbing anyone.

  • A big, heavy, decoupled stage proved its worth again. Directly above the theater is my living room system with a tiny HTIB subwoofer sitting on the floor. When that one plays, I can quite clearly make it out downstairs. Going the other way, however, there is very little energy transfer from the theater to upstairs, despite the fact that this sub is an SVS SB-12 with 10x the power.

  • Even though I didn't even try to soundproof, I am surprised at how loud I need to play before it affects the main floor, never mind the top floor bedrooms. I think good materials and general construction practices, attention to isolation, insulating appropriately with sand and fiber, bass control, and being "subjectively loud" thanks to having a low noise floor all play a part.

  • Bass trapping is SO important in a small room. I won't even pretend that I have anything resembling a flat response, but a few quick tests with REW showed far fewer problems than you might expect in a 10x14 space.

  • Guilford FR701 is much easier to stretch flat than their denser fabrics. All of my FR panels were great, but the ones in Spinel took a lot more work, and still have a few ripples.

  • A curved screen is absolutely necessary in a short throw anamorphic setup. I still have significant pincushion - it would take 2x the curvature to fully cancel out - but it's much, much better than it was projecting on the wall. A Windows desktop looks a bit silly, but video material and "big screen" UIs like PlayStation or AppleTV are fine.

  • A good colorimeter calibration can make even a cheapie projector punch far above its weight in a small room. It just doesn't take much to light up a 1.0 screen from ten feet away.

  • Made popcorn, watched the new Star Trek last weekend. 2.35:1 movies are awesome - that is all.


So, not much fanfare here. Chalk up another win for the basic AVS design principles.

Bonus points for spotting the miniature, hidden, equipment rack. tongue.gif
Edited by snowkarver - 9/30/13 at 9:29am
post #34 of 133
Nice theater snowkarver. I really like it.
post #35 of 133
Wow, Snowkarver, 2.0 was a really nice upgrade. I've followed your builds and I'm really impressed with what you shoved into 10x14 AND had it come out looking so great!

How are you liking the surrounds in the corners like that?

I can't find the hidden rack, I have to admit.
post #36 of 133
Hey buddy! It's been awhile. It's great to see your beautiful 2.0 and how you get it worked out in such a small space! Plus I like the end color choice more than the initial monochrome platte too. Great HT, again!!
post #37 of 133
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the compliments.

Surrounds in the corners sound fine - the seating position is ever so slightly forward of them, so the angle is quite close to the ITU standard of 110 degrees - to the side and a little behind the listener. I'm happy with the immersion, especially with THX processing.

The hidden rack took a little extra thought but was totally worth it! There's a hidden door in the fabric box below the screen that I framed like a kitchen cabinet with Blum euro hinges. You just press the edge gently and it pops open to reveal a tiny little ventilated equipment closet - only 20" high. It has another door for rear access, 120mm exhaust fan, and a passive intake grille.

You can sort of see it at the bottom right in this construction shot:



One more finished photo of the Epson 8350, Panamorph CineVista expansion lens, and my homebrew mount made up of RAM components:

post #38 of 133
I think your first home theater inspired a lot people by showing how a small space can make a great home theater. You did it again with HT2. Congratulations on a job well done. By the way, how did you do the fabric panels? Did you use a commercial system or was it DIY?
post #39 of 133
Great job. I love what you accomplished here.
post #40 of 133
Superb minimalism, makes me think of a Japanese ricepaper-wall room. Love it.
post #41 of 133
Thread Starter 
Thanks! I have to say that much of the design credit has to go to other forum members like Spaceman, whose rooms I blatantly ripped off...I mean "repurposed". smile.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_2008 View Post

I think your first home theater inspired a lot people by showing how a small space can make a great home theater. You did it again with HT2. Congratulations on a job well done. By the way, how did you do the fabric panels? Did you use a commercial system or was it DIY?

Fabric panels are all DIY using a modified GPowers method.

The frames are 1x2 dimensional lumber built with Kreg pocket hole joinery, plus 1/2" base shoe molding nailed on top to give more height and a finished look to the edge. Panels were then tacked onto 1x2 furring strips that are attached to the wall with brads and construction adhesive.
post #42 of 133
Love the look!
post #43 of 133
+1 looks awesome, congrats
post #44 of 133

Wow! I am a newbie and currently building a dedicated theater in a space 8x18 with 8 ft ceiling so your build is very encouraging to me same with your first project which I just saved for future reference.

 

I really like your side wall panels, it looks like you have some sort of mounting system on the wall to mount them to? Wall paneling is something I still don't understand how to construct.

 

Love it!

post #45 of 133
Really nicely done, Snokarver. I liked the first theatre a lot and I absolutely love this one. So clean and slick, it definitely looks professional. And even better, with the attention to detail that went on under the surface, you know its going to SOUND great too. I have a soft spot for small theatres, and yours is one of the best I've seen, hands down. The planning around fitting full-sized features like bass traps, equipment closets, and full projection in a constrained space is an art form that you have mastered.
post #46 of 133
This is a great looking theatre Snowkarver! Very modern and clean looking. I hope to one day be enjoying my very own finished creation as well.

Question for you:

In this pic I was looking to do the exact same thing but wasnt sure how to connect the other end of the IEC. Do you have to solder to the ends with the electrical wire and cover with heatshrink?

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1477348/lightbox/post/23564729/id/247099
post #47 of 133
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the kind words. I'm very happy to help carry the flag for us small-space builders biggrin.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thundersnow View Post

I really like your side wall panels, it looks like you have some sort of mounting system on the wall to mount them to? Wall paneling is something I still don't understand how to construct.

The panels are pretty standard here on AVS. They are just wooden frames with fabric stretched over them. Most people glue or nail a matching arrangement of wood strips (like 1x2s) to the drywall (furring) and then use either velcro, brad nails, or mechanical fasteners like speaker grille posts to attach the panels to the furring.

Inside each frame, I attached rockwool board (similar to OC703) to the bare wall with 3" drywall screws and fender washers.

There's plenty of discussion over on GPowers' original "bible" thread for panels - http://www.avsforum.com/t/487747/fabric-frames
post #48 of 133
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scanido View Post

This is a great looking theatre Snowkarver! Very modern and clean looking. I hope to one day be enjoying my very own finished creation as well.

Question for you:

In this pic I was looking to do the exact same thing but wasnt sure how to connect the other end of the IEC. Do you have to solder to the ends with the electrical wire and cover with heatshrink?

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1477348/lightbox/post/23564729/id/247099

Thanks, good luck.

I cut some short pigtail wires (just grab 4 inches of 14/2 romex and discard the jacket) for the 3 conductors, and soldered those to the IEC terminals with heatshrink - on my workbench. Then I used normal wirenuts inside the junction box to connect the pigtails to the travelers, just like any other switch or outlet. That way the assembly is easily removable, and you don't mess around with soldering things directly inside an electrical box.
post #49 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowkarver View Post

Thanks, good luck.

I cut some short pigtail wires (just grab 4 inches of 14/2 romex and discard the jacket) for the 3 conductors, and soldered those to the IEC terminals with heatshrink - on my workbench. Then I used normal wirenuts inside the junction box to connect the pigtails to the travelers, just like any other switch or outlet. That way the assembly is easily removable, and you don't mess around with soldering things directly inside an electrical box.

Great thanks!!

You saved me from buying another surge protector.
post #50 of 133
Thread Starter 
A couple more construction shots I found on my phone!

Here is the screen wall framing and furring for the fabric panels. You can also see the completed niche for the sub, plus the installed equipment rack without its door - during the build, a great place to store paint! I eventually filled the space to the left of the sub with another 8" depth of leftover Safe-n-Sound for more mid-bass trapping.




A closeup of two interesting features:

First is the unnecessarily complex angled box I had to build to conceal the front speakers. This was supposed to be standard 2x2 construction with 90 degree angles - but I failed to leave enough finished height! With a 90 degree box, the 1.5 inch height of the lower member would have blocked the woofer - obviously a no go. So instead I had to angle the front 26 degrees to match the speakers, and then use braced 1/4" plywood to clear the bottom. It was the thinnest material I could think of at the time - in hindsight, I should have done it with aluminum for more rigidity.



The other neat thing is the homebrew speaker mounts, which are not adjustable but far stronger than almost anything you can buy. These were important because I had to maintain an exact 26 degree downward angle to point the drivers at ear height.

The front pieces were ripped at that 26 degree angle, and I pressed 1/4"-20 studs into them, with big rubber washers. Instead of flimsy adjustable mounts, I screwed steel 90-angle brackets to each speaker, and then dropped those "ears" onto the exposed bolts, fixing everything down with butterfly nuts. It's an incredibly sturdy and well-damped assembly.
post #51 of 133
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by scanido View Post

Great thanks!!

You saved me from buying another surge protector.

Cool. That approach seems wasteful if you already have a full-featured (and probably expensive) power conditioner at the main rack location.
post #52 of 133
fantastic job! love clean look and asthetics
post #53 of 133
Simply amazing! This was well thought out, and the space turned out exquisitely!
post #54 of 133
Thread Starter 
... and whether small or big room, modest or reference ... I think this is why we all do it tongue.gif

post #55 of 133
I see you found some Hobbits.
post #56 of 133
Great setup.

Can you share some information on how you made the homebrew mount for the CineVista?
post #57 of 133
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by odedia View Post

Great setup.

Can you share some information on how you made the homebrew mount for the CineVista?

Thanks.

It was super easy. I took a RAM B-238 base and dremeled the holes a bit to align them perfectly with the ones on top of the CineVista bracket. The bracket holes are tapped with a standard thread (1/4-20 fine I think, but don't quote me on that) so I grabbed a couple of black 5/8" hex head machine screws in that size to mate them. This results in a CV bracket with a 1 inch RAM ball on top. Looks completely factory.

I then used a standard length arm, and a fancy mounting plate with lag screws into the stud - but really, once you have the ball going any RAM combination works....

The most important thing is that the total drop of top base + arm + bottom base + CV bracket is as close as possible to the distance between ceiling and projector lens. This puts gravity in your favor so that the "natural" hang of the CineVista centers it in front of the projector lens. You can then make very minor adjustments to get the pan and tilt perfect. Because the lens and bracket are heavy, if you have to move the lens too far away from its center of gravity, it will be very tough to adjust, and even tougher to keep in place. Don't ask me how I know.

In this picture, the RAM arm is perfectly vertical:



Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightlord View Post

I see you found some Hobbits.

smile.gif

That was going to be the original caption for my photo. How could a Theater for Hobbits be complete without at least half a dozen hobbits?
post #58 of 133
Very nice, I'm building a dedicated theater out of an upstairs spare bedroom (9 1/2' X 12') and will definitely
employ several of your tactics. Already have my Sony HW50ES on order from AVS!
post #59 of 133
I'm a novice and was wondering what the sand is used for?
post #60 of 133
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn View Post

I'm a novice and was wondering what the sand is used for?

It's for damping and reducing reverberation when you place speakers and especially subwoofers on the stage. Without it, you'd have a lot of undesirable energy bouncing around under there, getting transferred to other parts of your room or home.
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