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Whole House Ethernet Wiring

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have 5 bedrooms. 1 on the first floor, 3 on the second floor, and 1 on the 3rd floor. What is the best way to do the wiring? I am thinking about Cable Medem <-> Router <-> 5 Ethernet Cables to Each Room. Am I doing the correct thing? Thank you all!
post #2 of 15
Yes, that's the correct way, and actually, the only way it will work. The router must be the first thing after the modem, as it's what provides the network infrastructure for you to have more than one Ethernet device attached to the Internet (from the single IP address given to you by your ISP).

If you need more ports than the 5 on your router, you can then add Ethernet switches to further expand - the switch would plug into the router port.

Jeff
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

Yes, that's the correct way, and actually, the only way it will work. The router must be the first thing after the modem, as it's what provides the network infrastructure for you to have more than one Ethernet device attached to the Internet (from the single IP address given to you by your ISP).

If you need more ports than the 5 on your router, you can then add Ethernet switches to further expand - the switch would plug into the router port.

Jeff

Thank you. If I need more than 5, can I add another router connecting to the first router, e.g. at the 3rd floor?
post #4 of 15
You'll add a switch. In fact, you might as well do that now since you're going to max out your router ports. So, as Jautor wrote, take the modem to the router, then the router to the switch, then the switch goes to each room.
post #5 of 15
This is what you are describing...



It is recommended that you add a network switch between the router and the distribution to your home.

This is more of a complex setup, but it shows how a switch added after the router gives you a lot more ports so that you can connect a ton of locations throughout your home. It also shows that you can add more switches in local areas for local expansion if needed.

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AV_Integrated View Post

This is what you are describing...



It is recommended that you add a network switch between the router and the distribution to your home.

This is more of a complex setup, but it shows how a switch added after the router gives you a lot more ports so that you can connect a ton of locations throughout your home. It also shows that you can add more switches in local areas for local expansion if needed.


If my PC is connected to a switch, would it be difficult to do port forwarding if I want to remotely log into the computer?
post #7 of 15
No, because most switches that are used, are considered "dumb" devices. It is only once you get into smart or managed switches, then you have a little more ground work to get port forwarding to work like you want it.
post #8 of 15
Ummm... Last I checked port forwarding was managed by the router, not the switch. So, I'm pretty sure (not positive) that your router would act as the intelligent piece which would route your incoming traffic to the PC as you desired. You don't need a managed switch for this functionality, but can do it in almost any router available on the market.

It concerns me that you are talking about opening your PC up to the outside world, while being unfamiliar with which product achieves this goal and how to setup a standard home network. Please do your homework on network security and firewalls before you open up your home network or a PC to the outside world, and make sure your virus software is up to date.
post #9 of 15
May want to check again. If you use VLAN's on a managed switch, you have to also set that device up for the port forwarding. May want to recheck your info again AV_Integrated. Obvious you do not know that much about this. As for the OP, yes they do not need a managed switch, but if does help when you want to segregate traffic across the main LAN, that can eat up bandwidth, going back through the backbone to the Router.

As for their AV software, majority out there are garbage, and there are only a few that are worth their weight, same with the firewall, which Windows firewall on Vista/7/8 will do fine, but most of us turn the firewall off while on the LAN in our homes, and allow the Router to handle the Firewall.

To get back to the basics, really there is more here that the OP really got, that does not really explain the best way to go about what they want, nor did they really explain what they are looking in doing with their LAN, since everyone's LAN is different from the other guy/gal's.
post #10 of 15
Do you have a remote login solution in mind already, e.g. logmein?

I use logmein, and it does not require a managed switch, or anything else special. It's remote login for dummies.

Window's own RDP, AFAIK, also does not require a managed switch. I use it for access to a work PC. Logmein is much simpler to configure.

A VLAN would require a router that supports VLANs - not your typical consumer router, though widely available if you search.

What PC function do you need access to remotely?
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Do you have a remote login solution in mind already, e.g. logmein?

I use logmein, and it does not require a managed switch, or anything else special. It's remote login for dummies.

Window's own RDP, AFAIK, also does not require a managed switch. I use it for access to a work PC. Logmein is much simpler to configure.

A VLAN would require a router that supports VLANs - not your typical consumer router, though widely available if you search.

What PC function do you need access to remotely?

I just use Windows' remote log in.
post #12 of 15
I think you already know that the port forwarding takes place in the router. A remote computer accesses your router address and a particular port. The router sees that particular port number and forwards the packet on to the appropriate computer on your LAN. Adding a switch between the router and the computer shouldn't interfere with that process.

FWIW you are taking a risk allowing remote access. The ports used to do it are well known. Potentially, the only thing that stands between your computer and a hacker are the user id and password. IIRC Windows automatically adds any accounts with administrator privileges to those allowed to be accessed remotely when you set up remote access. It would be a good idea to set up a user with only the privileges you need and prevent remote access to accounts with administrator privileges. You will want to use a user id that is not easily guessed and a strong password. If your router allows you to filter MAC addresses of incoming packets for port forwarding, you might want to do that.
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm View Post

I think you already know that the port forwarding takes place in the router. A remote computer accesses your router address and a particular port. The router sees that particular port number and forwards the packet on to the appropriate computer on your LAN. Adding a switch between the router and the computer shouldn't interfere with that process.
I've certainly never had an issue with a unmanaged switch causing an issue when I have used port forwarding in the past. I also have not had an issue when I've used multiple switches in this process. Most of my issues, when I've had them, have been more PC related firewall issues than with the router as far as I can recall.

Good advice always to be sure that proper safeguards are in place to prevent external attacks as best as possible.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Do you have a remote login solution in mind already, e.g. logmein?

I use logmein, and it does not require a managed switch, or anything else special. It's remote login for dummies.

Window's own RDP, AFAIK, also does not require a managed switch. I use it for access to a work PC. Logmein is much simpler to configure.

A VLAN would require a router that supports VLANs - not your typical consumer router, though widely available if you search.

What PC function do you need access to remotely?
Teamviewer, since it is multi platform, and best remote login program out there.
post #15 of 15
Only time I have had issues with dumb switches, is when one starts to go bad, and you end up with packet flooding. As for the firewall, internally not really needed, unless you are trying to keep people off of that machine, and only allow select devices into it. Personally when you start growing your network so large that it becomes a small SOHO network, with multiple AP's, switches, then you should start looking at going with a managed switch to help with the traffic, and segregate the AP traffic, along with streaming devices, from any computers directly connected to that switch along with the other mentioned devices.
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