or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Gaming & Content Streaming › Home Theater Gaming › Xbox Area › wireless router
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

wireless router - Page 3

post #61 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daekwan View Post


Funny I ran across this thread again. And while considering which "AC" router to get next. I had looked at the AC66U, but it appears the firmware still isnt stable enough. I also looked at the Apple Extreme .11AC version, but it appears the range on it is fairly weak and the throughput speeds arent much faster than N. Anyways I just had FIOS installed today, got the 75/35 package and the bill will be about $190 a month including 3 cable boxes, DVR, a cable card and the Ultimate TV package. UTV package includes pretty much everything but HBO. Thats 439 regular channels, with 125 of them being HD channels. Here's what the bill looks like for anyone interested:

Action Products and Promotions Monthly Charges
New Double Play $129.99
FiOS TV Ultimate HD
FiOS Internet 75/35
$5 24-Month Contract Discount Included
$5 24 Mo. FiOS Internet Bundle Discount Included
$5 24 Mo. Bundle Credit Included
New Multi-Room DVR Package - 3 Room $39.99
New Cable Card Rental $3.99
Subtotal $173.97
Taxes, Fees and Other Verizon Charges $13.17
Regional Sports Network Fee $2.42
Estimated Monthly Charges
(Do not pay. This is not an actual bill.) $189.56

 

Seems like a decent deal for TV + internet. I pay $70 a month for my 100/35 (dont have any TV services), although I sort of got grandfathered into a killer deal from cablevision.

 

Doesnt FIOS usually come with it's own router built into the modem though, making it kind of tricky to use your own? That's always been a sticking point for me.

post #62 of 98
I'm glad this topic came up, because I'm moving in a few weeks and will have a different cable/internet provider (Comcast), and I've been wondering if this was the time to pick up a new router.

Currently, I have my modem and router upstairs at my desktop PC, and then run an Ethernet cable downstairs to my home theater system. At that point, I have a network switch that I use to connect my 360/PS3. We use the wireless for our tablet and our work laptops. I'm currently using an older Linksys WRT54G. I haven't had any major issues, but since everything is wired, is there any real reason to upgrade at this point?
post #63 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by markdavid570 View Post

I'm glad this topic came up, because I'm moving in a few weeks and will have a different cable/internet provider (Comcast), and I've been wondering if this was the time to pick up a new router.

Currently, I have my modem and router upstairs at my desktop PC, and then run an Ethernet cable downstairs to my home theater system. At that point, I have a network switch that I use to connect my 360/PS3. We use the wireless for our tablet and our work laptops. I'm currently using an older Linksys WRT54G. I haven't had any major issues, but since everything is wired, is there any real reason to upgrade at this point?
Yes, since the price of Wireless-N devices are cheap now days. They also come with 1000meg Ethernet ports. That WRT54G has lived a useful life, time to put it in the ground, and definitely upgrade.
post #64 of 98
Even if I primarily use wired connections? Would you anticipate any noticeable difference speed/lag/performance?
post #65 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by markdavid570 View Post

Even if I primarily use wired connections? Would you anticipate any noticeable difference speed/lag/performance?

If you dont use any wireless devices, unless your Internet package is over 50mbps a WRT54G is probably fine.

Wireless G is kind of slumming it for any modern wireless device though.
post #66 of 98
Thanks. We don't use much wireless, so I'm not sure I want to spend the money if there's not a difference for wired connections. I'll have to even check if my wife's tablet and my laptop can handle N.
post #67 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by markdavid570 View Post

Thanks. We don't use much wireless, so I'm not sure I want to spend the money if there's not a difference for wired connections. I'll have to even check if my wife's tablet and my laptop can handle N.
Yes you will see a large change, when streaming media across the network, or from services like Amazon or Netflix, along with when you are moving files around the network.

The WRT54G is an antique at this day and age, and its days are numbered, for when it will finally go out on you. Now is the time to update to a newer router, that will give you 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports, Wireless-N and better handling inside, due to they have better CPU's inside the newer routers now, along with more RAM for handling traffic.
post #68 of 98
Okay, thanks. I just spoke with a Comcast rep, and I'm getting the tv/internet package with 50 mbps, and I need to pick up a new modem. I'm thinking about going with the Motorola sb6141, and since I'm upgrading that, I'm planning to pick up a new router. Since the Asus routers have been spoken of highly, is there much difference between the N66R and the N665? I hate to keep repeating myself, but for gaming/Netflix/etc. I use a hard-wired connection, and only use wireless for the tablet and my work laptop. Also, any need to upgrade my cat5e cable or my network switch??

Sorry to hijack your thread Benjamin!!
post #69 of 98
Go with either the Asus RT-N56U or Linksys E2000 for your router. As for the modem, you want one that will last you long enough, that if they start bonding more than 8 channels, you do not want to have to go and buy a new one. The SB6141 will work for the package you are getting. Just have to pair it with either one of the two routers I posted, and you will be fine for a while. As for the Cat-5e, you are fine with it for Gig.
post #70 of 98
If you're using primarily wired connections there is no reason to spend money on top of the line wireless routers. Any decent router with gigabit ports will work fine. I suggest something like the D-Link DIR-655. Here is one on Amazon for under $90. I have used one of these for 2+ years and it has been rock solid for the price point. I've had to reboot it one time in that period. It has a decent automatic QoS system, it tests your bandwidth at each reboot and then applies a QoS profile to prioritize latency sensitive traffic, like games. Since the introduction of this router, I've yet to notice latency spikes while gaming when the router is also being used by others in the home. On a previous Linksys router this was always an issue.
post #71 of 98
Now, here's my last question. Since I'm moving to a different house, and can have the installation done by Comcast, would I be better off having the modem installed at the entertainment center in the living room and using shorter cables to connect my 360/PS3 to the router? Since I typically only use my PC for web browsing, I'm fine with a wireless connection to avoid running a 50-foot Ethernet cable upstairs (like I'm doing now, only down to the entertainment center).
post #72 of 98
That would be my preference, I don't like wireless connections on my gaming devices.
post #73 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by markdavid570 View Post

Thanks. We don't use much wireless, so I'm not sure I want to spend the money if there's not a difference for wired connections. I'll have to even check if my wife's tablet and my laptop can handle N.

Any tablet or laptop thats 3 years older or newer, will support N.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post

Yes you will see a large change, when streaming media across the network, or from services like Amazon or Netflix, along with when you are moving files around the network.

The WRT54G is an antique at this day and age, and its days are numbered, for when it will finally go out on you. Now is the time to update to a newer router, that will give you 10/100/1000 Ethernet ports, Wireless-N and better handling inside, due to they have better CPU's inside the newer routers now, along with more RAM for handling traffic.

Agreed the WRT54G is ancient. Its rock solid and stable, but its ancient and slow. And will definitely affect your WIRED & WIRELESS performance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by markdavid570 View Post

Okay, thanks. I just spoke with a Comcast rep, and I'm getting the tv/internet package with 50 mbps, and I need to pick up a new modem. I'm thinking about going with the Motorola sb6141, and since I'm upgrading that, I'm planning to pick up a new router. Since the Asus routers have been spoken of highly, is there much difference between the N66R and the N665? I hate to keep repeating myself, but for gaming/Netflix/etc. I use a hard-wired connection, and only use wireless for the tablet and my work laptop. Also, any need to upgrade my cat5e cable or my network switch??

Sorry to hijack your thread Benjamin!!

Definitely get the SB6141. Its a DOCSIS 3.0 modem which can support the higher speeds Comcast is able to offer. Most importantly, it can support channel bonding on up to 8 channels. Even without the bonding, if one channel is problematic it easily switches to another. Think of channels as lanes on the highway, the more channels the easier traffic can flow.

Asus RT-N66U is probably the best N router on the market. Its not cheap, but its rock stable like your old Linksys WRT54G was.. and one of the fastest N routers you can buy. They do have a cheaper/older version of the 66U, that is the 56U. And you can get away with using that $95 router to suit you well. But I caution against going any cheaper than the 56U. A router is not a place to go "cheap". It is the device that controls the local network communication between all of your devices.. and the gateway to your internet connection to the outside world. If your router is not stable or does not work, then all your devices connected to it will not work properly. And that is a headache you do not want. Coming from the WRT54G (which was probably the most stable consumer level router ever sold).. I can imagine you've never had headaches with a router. Why risk that now?

You want a router that is fast, stable and doesnt give you headaches down the road. All of the Asus routers are pretty highly rated. All of them are pretty fast & stable. About the only one that still has improvements to make is the newest announced model that supports 802.11AC. AC is a brand new spec and definitely way more than what you need. That said, expect newer wireless devices to start supporting .11AC.. so if you buying, its not a bad idea to consider buying for the future. Here's a few link for the Asus routers. They go in order of price, coverage area & speed. Any of these options would work very well for you and your new Comcast connection.

Asus .11N-56U ($95) - http://www.amazon.com/ASUS-Dual-Band-Wireless-N-Router-RT-N56U/dp/B0049YQVHE/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1378907840&sr=1-1&keywords=asus+56+router
Asus .11N-66U ($150) - http://www.amazon.com/RT-N66U-Dual-Band-Wireless-N900-Gigabit-Router/dp/B006QB1RPY
Asus .11AC-66U ($190) - http://www.amazon.com/RT-AC66U-Dual-Band-Wireless-AC1750-Gigabit-Router/dp/B008ABOJKS/ref=sr_1_4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1378907840&sr=1-4&keywords=asus+56+router
Quote:
Originally Posted by c.kingsley View Post

If you're using primarily wired connections there is no reason to spend money on top of the line wireless routers. Any decent router with gigabit ports will work fine. I suggest something like the D-Link DIR-655. Here is one on Amazon for under $90. I have used one of these for 2+ years and it has been rock solid for the price point. I've had to reboot it one time in that period. It has a decent automatic QoS system, it tests your bandwidth at each reboot and then applies a QoS profile to prioritize latency sensitive traffic, like games. Since the introduction of this router, I've yet to notice latency spikes while gaming when the router is also being used by others in the home. On a previous Linksys router this was always an issue.

Id have to disagree with the advice above. Mainly because Dlink 655 isn't highly rated. As I said above, a router is not a place to go "cheap". It is the single device that controls the local network communication between all of your devices.. and the gateway to your internet connection to the outside world. The DIR-655 may have worked well for you.. but it has not worked well for me and so many others. Even the link you posted for the Dlink 655 reveals an average rating of 3.5 stars.. the Asus routers are reviewed much higher around 4.5. And ranked even higher by professional review sites. I've personally owned the Dlink 655 for about 2 months and it was quite possibly the worse router I've ever owned. And I've owned about 9 different routers. Trust, I'm not picking on you or the Dlink 655 router.. reviews by both consumers & professional agree with what I am saying and there is no way I can recommend it to anybody.
Quote:
Originally Posted by markdavid570 View Post

Now, here's my last question. Since I'm moving to a different house, and can have the installation done by Comcast, would I be better off having the modem installed at the entertainment center in the living room and using shorter cables to connect my 360/PS3 to the router? Since I typically only use my PC for web browsing, I'm fine with a wireless connection to avoid running a 50-foot Ethernet cable upstairs (like I'm doing now, only down to the entertainment center).

Ideally you want the modem/router close to each. It helps if you ever need to trouble shoot anything, because both devices are together and both have status lights showing what its currently activity level is. You can place the modem/router anywhere you want. But make sure it is in an area of the home you use more often than not. Reason being is that the further you get away from the base of the wireless router, the weaker the wireless signal becomes and slower your network performance will become with those devices connected via wifi. It would also mean longer ethernet cable runs.

So if you spend most of the time in the living room.. then thats a great place to put those devices. You will have short cable runs for any devices (360/PS3) you want connect via ethernet. And you will have a decent amount of wireless coverage for the rest of the home to cover your PC/tablet web browsing. Be advised you definitely want to connect the PS3 via ethernet. The PS3 still uses the old G-wireless connection and there is definitely a big drop in performance from doing that. The PS3 does come with a gigabit ethernet connection, so using it will help with streaming media from the internet and other devices.. and of course when playing online. I've played my 360's on both wired & wireless and cant tell a difference to be honest. 360 supports wifi-N and its more than enough to get the job done.

That said.. I agree with others in that a wired connection will always be faster & more consistent than a wireless connection. Rather you can notice that difference or not, is another question to be answered.
Edited by Daekwan - 9/11/13 at 7:30am
post #74 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daekwan View Post

Id have to disagree with the advice above. Mainly because Dlink 655 isn't highly rated. As I said above, a router is not a place to go "cheap". It is the single device that controls the local network communication between all of your devices.. and the gateway to your internet connection to the outside world. The DIR-655 may have worked well for you.. but it has not worked well for me and so many others.
Well I guess N=1 experience cancels N=1 experience, battle of the anecdotes! I'm sorry you had a negative experience but that doesn't make it a bad router. On a percentage basis, the difference in the user reviews between the DIR-655 and the model you posted which was price comparable (RT-N56U) isn't even significant -- and it was still more expensive. The combined 4 and 5 star ratings are 66% for the DIR-655 and 73% for the Asus. You have to spend almost double the price of the DIR-655 to get the "more highly rated" N66-U. Also, let's not be disingenuous. All home routers are cheap, disposable, throw away junk. But then in my experience, I'm used the quality of routers like this.
post #75 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by c.kingsley View Post

Well I guess N=1 experience cancels N=1 experience, battle of the anecdotes! I'm sorry you had a negative experience but that doesn't make it a bad router. On a percentage basis, the difference in the user reviews between the DIR-655 and the model you posted which was price comparable (RT-N56U) isn't even significant -- and it was still more expensive. The combined 4 and 5 star ratings are 66% for the DIR-655 and 73% for the Asus. You have to spend almost double the price of the DIR-655 to get the "more highly rated" N66-U. Also, let's not be disingenuous. All home routers are cheap, disposable, throw away junk. But then in my experience, I'm used the quality of routers like this.

The Asus N56 is still much higher rated than the Dlink655. And it costs a whopping $16 more.
post #76 of 98
Thread Starter 
yeah i love my asus... going to have to side with Daekwan on this..
post #77 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daekwan View Post

The Asus N56 is still much higher rated than the Dlink655. And it costs a whopping $16 more.
Even if those reviews were somehow scientific, the difference would be considered statistically insignificant noise -- hint: irrelevant. And maybe price matters to some people? $16 could be a big deal to some. The original question asked for options and I provided an option. There are tons of valid options out there in addition to my suggestion or yours, we're not searching for the ring of power here. ONE ROUTER TO RULE THEM ALL.
post #78 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by markdavid570 View Post

Now, here's my last question. Since I'm moving to a different house, and can have the installation done by Comcast, would I be better off having the modem installed at the entertainment center in the living room and using shorter cables to connect my 360/PS3 to the router? Since I typically only use my PC for web browsing, I'm fine with a wireless connection to avoid running a 50-foot Ethernet cable upstairs (like I'm doing now, only down to the entertainment center).
Have the modem set up in say the utility room with the rest of the coax connections, or basement, and then run Cat-5e or Cat-6 from that point to various rooms. Place the router down there, and use an Access point in at least one, maybe two other rooms, besides the router to cover the house and property outside.

At the Entertainment center, just place a 5-Port switch there. It is easier to have a central point for the networking equipment like the modem or router in an odd place, that later on you would have to possibly move it; which can cause issues if you wanted to make changes down the road.
post #79 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by c.kingsley View Post

Even if those reviews were somehow scientific, the difference would be considered statistically insignificant noise -- hint: irrelevant. And maybe price matters to some people? $16 could be a big deal to some. The original question asked for options and I provided an option. There are tons of valid options out there in addition to my suggestion or yours, we're not searching for the ring of power here. ONE ROUTER TO RULE THEM ALL.
Wish that there was one router that would rule all, but there isn't. I always go to http://www.smallnetbuilder.com first when looking at what the reviews and comparisons are like for equipment. As for Comcast, there have been mixed reviews over at http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r28290960-2013-Modem-Poll older reviews at http://www.dslreports.com/faq/10327

The biggest complaint with the SB6141 , is that on some headends they have pushed the wrong firmware to the SB6141 modems.
post #80 of 98
Buy an asus rt-ac66u and you'll be solid for years.
post #81 of 98
Well, the only thing there is that there has been an RT-AC68U announced too, which might drive the price down on the older model too. Of course, it was announced in like February or so, and hasn't gone on sale yet, but still. biggrin.gif
post #82 of 98
Thanks for all the replies! I ended up getting the Motorola SB6141 and the Asus RT-66R (Best Buy's retail version). They actually had an Apple Airport extreme on clearance for about the same price, and I was this close to taking Daekwan's earlier advice and getting it, but I had read so much about the Asus that I just decided to stick with the plan. I'm glad I did, because I'm not sure which generation of Airport it was. Anyway, since the house we're moving into is a rental and will hopefully be less than a two-year stay, I figure I'm going to have the modem installed at the entertainment center, since that's where the majority of the use occurs, and it will be easier to hardwire the 360 and PS3 (with an eventual upgrade to the XB1/PS4, but let me get through grad school first!). I like the idea of using a "utility room", but we're just not going to have it, so I'll keep that in mind for when/if we buy a home in the future.

Thanks again for all the advice! My current internet service is only like 5 mbps or something, so the upgrade to 50 with the newer equipment should sure make a difference. Now, let all the lag comp. issues with COD begin!
post #83 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by c.kingsley View Post

Well I guess N=1 experience cancels N=1 experience, battle of the anecdotes! I'm sorry you had a negative experience but that doesn't make it a bad router. On a percentage basis, the difference in the user reviews between the DIR-655 and the model you posted which was price comparable (RT-N56U) isn't even significant -- and it was still more expensive. The combined 4 and 5 star ratings are 66% for the DIR-655 and 73% for the Asus. You have to spend almost double the price of the DIR-655 to get the "more highly rated" N66-U. Also, let's not be disingenuous. All home routers are cheap, disposable, throw away junk. But then in my experience, I'm used the quality of routers like this.

Came here to post about something else (see my next post), but had to chime in here. I've seen this router question pop up a lot on different gaming threads on this site over the past few years. Almost every single time someone with the correct knowledge posts the below link showing precisely the performances on most industry standard routers in the marketplace. There's a reason why the black diamond is brought up in every discussion, as it is considered the best overall performance router over the past few years.

That site is - http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwan/router-charts/bar/74-wan-to-lan

Total Simultaneous Throughput:
DIR-655 - 363.7
RT-N56U - 1,268.6

WAN to LAN Throughput:
DIR-655 - 377.2
RT-N56U - 898.7

There's an enormous difference between these two routers, as shown above. Sorry, not trying to be a jerk here...just want people asking these questions to be educated before they make their buying decision (as it has helped a ton of people on this forum).
post #84 of 98
Daekwan,

Thought you'd enjoy this little nugget I just saw - http://www.verizon.com/home/fios-fastest-internet/ultimate

FIOS is now offering 500/100 speeds, at a cost of $300/month eek.gif
post #85 of 98
There's an enormous difference on paper, but unless you actually have an Internet connection upwards of 300mbps, it won't make any difference. Those numbers also tend to shrink radically once you start enabling features like qos.

I've been through quite a few consumer routers in the past few weeks, and there's not a single one out there that I can find that can route more than 70-80mbps with legitimate QoS.

I eventually settled on the ac66u, because I got tired of returning routers to amazon, but real life routing performance on a high bandwidth connection was basically identical between all of them with QoS off.
post #86 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

There's an enormous difference on paper, but unless you actually have an Internet connection upwards of 300mbps, it won't make any difference. Those numbers also tend to shrink radically once you start enabling features like qos.

I've been through quite a few consumer routers in the past few weeks, and there's not a single one out there that I can find that can route more than 70-80mbps with legitimate QoS.

I eventually settled on the ac66u, because I got tired of returning routers to amazon, but real life routing performance on a high bandwidth connection was basically identical between all of them with QoS off.
Exactly... You'd have to move up to a entry/mid level enterprise solution, like the Juniper SSG140. I guess if you're forking over $300/mo for Internet service, you can afford to buy a solid ~$1k router. At that level of service consumer routers simply don't have the performance, reliability, up time or feature sets to make them worthwhile. The downside is that they aren't plug and play and require some knowledge to properly configure.
post #87 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by c.kingsley View Post

Exactly... You'd have to move up to a entry/mid level enterprise solution, like the Juniper SSG140. I guess if you're forking over $300/mo for Internet service, you can afford to buy a solid ~$1k router. At that level of service consumer routers simply don't have the performance, reliability, up time or feature sets to make them worthwhile. The downside is that they aren't plug and play and require some knowledge to properly configure.

Yep, I'm kind of stuck in the middle right now. Can't find an affordable, reasonably easy to configure router with adequate performance to handle my connection in the way I'm used to. Not that I really *need* qos at this level, but running without it just feels wrong.

C.kingsley, you have any experience with ubiquiti gear? The edgemax routers seem high performance, and the seamless roaming APs would be a killer feature to me....but I'm stepping outside of my comfort zone with the enterprise stuff, I'm mostly used to stuff like tomato and dd-wrt.
post #88 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

Yep, I'm kind of stuck in the middle right now. Can't find an affordable, reasonably easy to configure router with adequate performance to handle my connection in the way I'm used to. Not that I really *need* qos at this level, but running without it just feels wrong.

C.kingsley, you have any experience with ubiquiti gear? The edgemax routers seem high performance, and the seamless roaming APs would be a killer feature to me....but I'm stepping outside of my comfort zone with the enterprise stuff, I'm mostly used to stuff like tomato and dd-wrt.
Hmm, that is an interesting find. The price : performance ratio is kind of ridiculous compared to Cisco or Juniper. I don't have any experience with their reliability, though. But, for $99 it might be worth a trial. In order to setup an enterprise level product you just need to be more comfortable with TCP/IP and networking in general. You will need to assign IP to the WAN or enable DHCP on the interface, assign an IP range to the LAN and configure a DHCP server on the LAN. Then build a route table, which would consist of a single route to the default gateway for a home setup. Then the firewall would likely require manual configuration, most likely, due to lack of uPnP support. There is a GUI on it, but I see it also has a CLI so who knows how much of the setup can be done via GUI.
post #89 of 98
Yeah, the smallnetbuilder review basically came to the conclusion that's its high performance but far too reliant on the command line...maybe it'll get better in a few years.

I was considering the cisco RV320, most of the GUI seemed familiar enough, but the QoS looked completely alien to me. And I'm still not convinced it could handle 100mbps.
post #90 of 98
I wouldn't trust anything Cisco branded that doesn't run IOS, that pretty much tells me it is a Linksys spinoff. You'd have to look at a Cisco ASA for their entry level line. Here is one on Amazon. Although it operates on IOS there is a downloadable, installable GUI (Cisco ASDM) which can help w/ configuration for less technical folks.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Xbox Area
AVS › AVS Forum › Gaming & Content Streaming › Home Theater Gaming › Xbox Area › wireless router