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Which router for home networking/streaming? Best of three for my situation - Page 2

post #31 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusGus748s View Post

Well, my wife and I are getting tired of how slow U-Verse 12 Mbps connection is. For the past 3 weeks or so our connection slows down tremendously. It doesn't matter if it is wireless or wired. I've had 5 different AT&T techs come by the house, they've replaced the RG 2wire box every time, and I even got their newest top of the line 2wire 3801 router/modem, and I'm still having slow connectivity.

Comcast is coming by on Monday. For $49.99 I will get 50 Mbps and TV (I don't really care for the TV part, but it's included). However, they will be a fee for renting their equipment $6.99 for the router/modem. I've got the Motorola DOCSIS 3.0 High-Speed Cable Modem, but I do not have a wireless router. I was thinking of buying http://www.bestbuy.com/site/SURFboard+eXtreme+DOCSIS+3.0+Wireless-N+Cable+Modem+and+Gigabit+Router/9962417.p?id=1218202944998&skuId=9962417&st=cable%20modem&cp=1&lp=4.

However, I am not sure if that will be the best move since I will be only able to use it with comcast. I was wondering if anyone else is using Comcast and what router are you using? I was thinking of going with Asus - Dual-Band Wireless-AC Gigabit Router with 4-Port Ethernet Switch RT-AC66R.

One big strike against those 6580's is that they don't do 2.4Ghz and 5.0Ghz at the same time, it's one or the other. So if you have phones that only do 2.4Ghz wifi you're stuck. Get seperates, the ASUS routers get excellent reviews. We're very happy with ours.
post #32 of 60
I think I'm going with an ASUS router. I'm not sure if I should go with the AC or not?
post #33 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusGus748s View Post

I think I'm going with an ASUS router. I'm not sure if I should go with the AC or not?

If the extra $50.00 doesn't bother you go for it.
post #34 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by robnix View Post

If the extra $50.00 doesn't bother you go for it.

It doesn't bother me at all. My wife in the other hand....lol
post #35 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusGus748s View Post

It doesn't bother me at all. My wife in the other hand....lol

Your secret is safe with me ;-)
post #36 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by draconiuslives View Post

I am not the best at networking and I want to make sure I am getting the best bang for my buck.

Couple known items:
1.) I do NOT need AC as I have no AC device and no need in the future to upgrade any wireless cards to AC
2.) I want to connect an external HDD for easy access and streaming through CPU's, XBox and PS3
3.) I live in a split level home that is 1700 sq/ft so range is important to me
4.) I would be using basic setup for the router to have NAT open, port forwarding, etc.
5.) I would like to stay in the $100 range.

With all that said, I found these three routers on Amazon that seem similar and strong.

A.) Linksys EA4500

B.) ASUS RT-N56U

C.) Netgear WNDR3700

Thanks for the support, and if I posted in the wrong forum please let me know which would be the best to post in. smile.gif




First let me state I am a Netgear AV Consultant meaning that I work for Netgear to help folks like you with questions such as the one you posted.

So let me begin with there are a mulititude of router choices. You know this already. From Netgear you listed the WNDR3700. This use to me their top line router and really has probably been the most success router to hit the consumer marketplace. As follow on products the closest comparison to the most up to date ptroduct would be the WNDR4500. Several folks mentioned it here. I would echo that suggestion if it meets your budget. Why is it better then the 3700? Whell several reasons. First off is the RF section. It has much more powerful RF amps then the 3700 so the range is greater. Second is that it uses a 3 radio technology that allows multiple radios to reach your client devices and uses the one with least interference. Again the result is increased range and better throughput. The WNDR4500 also utilizes Netgears updated UI and feature set. It has the most useful features set that today's routers offer. In addition it supports the Netgear Genie software suite which add a host of capabilities to your network environment. It is a very nice product and one you will be very happy with.

That said the 3700 is still a robust product but for a few extra dollars you will a get one of the best performing N routers available anywhere with all of Netgear's latest softwrae and technology.

Lastly I use a 4500 and a 3700. While there are comments about some firmware issues with the 3700 I have 2 in use (have 2 homes where they reside 1 is an access point and the other is the router) All mine are rock solid. Cannot remember the last time I had to reboot anything.

Any questions PM me.

Bob Silver
Netgear AV Consultant
post #37 of 60
I loved my WNDR3700 until I upgraded the firmware. Thereafter, it was a nightmare. I contacted costumer support and they weren't of any help. Probably one of the worse customer support I've ever had.

After that issue I'm squeptical about buying another Netgear router.
post #38 of 60
GusGus

Unfortunately there was a period of 3700 firmware issues with certain versions of the router. From a hardware standpoint there are 3 different revs of the 3700. I don't recall which but there was an issue with a firmware release and one of the revs. That was unfortunate. Lastly tech support doesn't get detailed info on firmware issues etc. they are there for mainstream support across the product spectrum. In cases such as yours I can understand your disatisfaction to their support. I have experienced myself. It is one of te reasons Netgear invests in me to monitor the boards for issues like that so they can correct it.

The new products are all really good. I have first hand experience with the r6300 AC router, WNDR4700, 4500, 3800, 3700. Currently I have running the WNDR4700, 4500, ,3700(2 of these between my homes). They all are performing great. Totally stable and great performance.

Bob Silver
NETGEAR AV Consultant
post #39 of 60
One more thing I forgot to mention. NETGEAR recently released the r6100. This is an N plus AC router. It uses the N technology in a 300mbs speed at the 2.4 g band and the AC technology on the 5 g band with up to 900mbs speed with an AC client. Admittedly this is still a way off with AC clients but this is a good way to get the next gen tech at a low price. Fry's has it on ad for $99 today.

Bob Silver
post #40 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post

GusGus

Unfortunately there was a period of 3700 firmware issues with certain versions of the router. From a hardware standpoint there are 3 different revs of the 3700. I don't recall which but there was an issue with a firmware release and one of the revs. That was unfortunate. Lastly tech support doesn't get detailed info on firmware issues etc. they are there for mainstream support across the product spectrum. In cases such as yours I can understand your disatisfaction to their support. I have experienced myself. It is one of te reasons Netgear invests in me to monitor the boards for issues like that so they can correct it.

The new products are all really good. I have first hand experience with the r6300 AC router, WNDR4700, 4500, 3800, 3700. Currently I have running the WNDR4700, 4500, ,3700(2 of these between my homes). They all are performing great. Totally stable and great performance.

Bob Silver
NETGEAR AV Consultant

There was a 3rd version of hardware? Wow. I had v1, and the experience was not good. v2 came out shortly after v1 and I always thought that was a bad sign about the hardware that I had. If you go to the Netgear forums on the 3700, everyone was complaining. We had supposedly the greatest router out there, but a bunch of the features that made it great didn't work. Or you had to make a choice in firmware.... If you upgraded firmware, it would fix problem A, but then create problem B. I gave up. My 3700 is now a dust collector.
post #41 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by comicguy View Post

Oh c'mon..admit it, you are as dumb as me! We just don't know enough to set up our wireless networks! If we did, we would all be streaming 3D blu ray movies with HD sound all the time with no hiccups! But don't feel bad, my brother in law works for Netgear and even he thinks the technology is not stable enough to stream all of this stuff wirelessly! He tries to cover up his incompetence by throwing around big terms like "latency" throughput" etc, but now I know the truth!
Man, how dumb is Netgear for keeping him as an employee for the last decade! He does not even know how to set up a wireless Network!

You can stream live TV over WiFi. I think one thing that was missed in the original post was 5 GHz. I'd also say that you'd probably need more than one AP in the house for coverage. With two 300N APs on 5GHz, I am streaming Live TV in WMC using a HDHomeRun OTA tuner. No magic settings. It just works. smile.gif I will not make any claims about streaming BluRay over WiFi.

I wouldn't recommend doing this on 2.4 GHz, and I definitely wouldn't recommend 40 MHz channels on 2.4. It's hard enough to get 1 good 2.4 channel, much less 2.
post #42 of 60
the 4500 has been a phenomenal router for me, simple as that. The 2.4 range is far and away better than any I've owend- at I've had more than I care to admit.

"Router talk" is always tough: there are so many freakin variables and even the devices themselves seem to have more variance than virtually any other piece of CE gear I can think of. I can only speak to my experience and scenario...again, the 4500 has been great.

Good luck.

James
post #43 of 60
Yeah, I have no problem streaming live tv, just when it gets to full blu-ray rips with hd sound. Especially with the higher bit rate discs..
post #44 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by mastermaybe View Post

the 4500 has been a phenomenal router for me, simple as that. The 2.4 range is far and away better than any I've owend- at I've had more than I care to admit.

"Router talk" is always tough: there are so many freakin variables and even the devices themselves seem to have more variance than virtually any other piece of CE gear I can think of. I can only speak to my experience and scenario...again, the 4500 has been great.

Good luck.

James
I have played with 6 different routers this year, so I hear ya..
post #45 of 60
I'm thinking if going with Apple AirPort Extreme since I've got so many iDevises. Anyone using the most current one?
Edited by GusGus748s - 6/28/13 at 11:17am
post #46 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusGus748s View Post

I'm thinking if going with Apple AirPort Extreme since I've got so many iDevises. Anyone using the most current one?
hell, i can't find anyone seling them yet besides Apple...
post #47 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by comicguy View Post

Yeah, I have no problem streaming live tv, just when it gets to full blu-ray rips with hd sound. Especially with the higher bit rate discs..


You definitely will not be happy streaming 1080p files over N technology. If the file has been compressed you may get away with it but most times no. This is where AC technology will shine. There are usb C adapters so if you are using an HTPC you can utilize AC today. Other devices like ATV, Roku etc no.

I have tried the 900 mbs 2 radio AC usb adapter and it streamed 1080p files fine. It will be great when we see more clients with this technology.
post #48 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post

You definitely will not be happy streaming 1080p files over N technology. If the file has been compressed you may get away with it but most times no. This is where AC technology will shine. There are usb C adapters so if you are using an HTPC you can utilize AC today. Other devices like ATV, Roku etc no.

I have tried the 900 mbs 2 radio AC usb adapter and it streamed 1080p files fine. It will be great when we see more clients with this technology.
Preaching to the choir Bob! I know the limitations and that is why I go wired whenever I can!
However, is it possible you don't know how to set up your wireless correctly? wink.gif Resident expert Nethawk here (in this very thread) is able to do it with a Linksys E4200! And do it "consistently and reliably". biggrin.gif

On another note looking forward to when we CAN do all this high bit rate stuff over wireless. I will be first in line to buy that router!
post #49 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by comicguy View Post

hell, i can't find anyone seling them yet besides Apple...

My local best buy will be getting 4 later today.
post #50 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by comicguy View Post

Preaching to the choir Bob! I know the limitations and that is why I go wired whenever I can!
However, is it possible you don't know how to set up your wireless correctly? wink.gif Resident expert Nethawk here (in this very thread) is able to do it with a Linksys E4200! And do it "consistently and reliably". biggrin.gif

On another note looking forward to when we CAN do all this high bit rate stuff over wireless. I will be first in line to buy that router!

Well he IS the Hawk of the Net!
post #51 of 60
Sorry I'm a little late getting back to this thread. I stream uncompressed mkv ripped from bluray using the RTN56U. I do use just core DTS audio, because that's what the wdtv accepts.
post #52 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobsilver View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by comicguy View Post

Yeah, I have no problem streaming live tv, just when it gets to full blu-ray rips with hd sound. Especially with the higher bit rate discs..


You definitely will not be happy streaming 1080p files over N technology. If the file has been compressed you may get away with it but most times no. This is where AC technology will shine. There are usb C adapters so if you are using an HTPC you can utilize AC today. Other devices like ATV, Roku etc no.

I have tried the 900 mbs 2 radio AC usb adapter and it streamed 1080p files fine. It will be great when we see more clients with this technology.
Quote:
Sorry I'm a little late getting back to this thread. I stream uncompressed mkv ripped from bluray using the RTN56U. I do use just core DTS audio, because that's what the wdtv accepts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nethawk View Post

No you don't, you only think you do. Just ask the collective brain trust above. After all, one of them has a brother in law who works for Netgear. Impressive credentials, that.
Yeah, well the guy from NetGear says you're not, unless you're using several hundred dollars worth of gear to avoid a ten dollar piece of wire. Oh wait, you wanted to hook up your Roku or AppleTV to enjoy these high bitrate streams. Sorry, no can do...
post #53 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by draconiuslives View Post

I am not the best at networking and I want to make sure I am getting the best bang for my buck.

Couple known items:
1.) I do NOT need AC as I have no AC device and no need in the future to upgrade any wireless cards to AC
2.) I want to connect an external HDD for easy access and streaming through CPU's, XBox and PS3
3.) I live in a split level home that is 1700 sq/ft so range is important to me
4.) I would be using basic setup for the router to have NAT open, port forwarding, etc.
5.) I would like to stay in the $100 range.

With all that said, I found these three routers on Amazon that seem similar and strong.

A.) Linksys EA4500

B.) ASUS RT-N56U

C.) Netgear WNDR3700

Thanks for the support, and if I posted in the wrong forum please let me know which would be the best to post in. smile.gif

And going back to the OPs OP first sentence I have to say a $10 piece of wire and a $15 switch is absolutely the best bang for a buck.
post #54 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nethawk View Post

The guy hired to monitor discussion forums? Yeah, I'm convinced.
Well if he thought his products could do it, I'm sure he'd have said so instead of 'You definitely will not be happy streaming 1080p files'...
post #55 of 60
Well, lets get back to talking about routers rather than arguing about streaming wireless.

However, I would like to see a MediaInfo of the files they are streaming.
post #56 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by GusGus748s View Post

Well, lets get back to talking about routers rather than arguing about streaming wireless.

However, I would like to see a MediaInfo of the files they are streaming.

Forget it. I have nothing to prove to you or anyone else in this thread who has called me a liar. Goldenrod may if he wishes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by olyteddy View Post

Well if he thought his products could do it, I'm sure he'd have said so instead of 'You definitely will not be happy streaming 1080p files'...

I'll put his word and credentials up against 34 years IT experience, 19 years in designing, implementing, operating and optimizing enterprise networks, contributions to several IEEE drafts and two CCIE any day.

I never said wireless was better than wired, I would always recommend wired if possible. I never said 1080p over Wireless N was easy, I said it could be done. I've since been ridiculed both ignorantly and consistently. I'm done. If you want further information search avsforum or google - you'll either find helpful information or, as I might suspect given the level of intellect shown in this thread, a lot more liars.

In 12 years on AVS I've felt the need to block one person. One thread, three more added to the list. What a shame.

To the OP, the recommendation stands - buy the Asus, and if you wish PM me for optimization assistance. Or, ask the Netgear guy. Best of luck to you.
post #57 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nethawk View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by GusGus748s View Post

...
However, I would like to see a MediaInfo of the files they are streaming.

Forget it. I have nothing to prove to you or anyone else in this thread who has called me a liar. Goldenrod may if he wishes.

...

I'll put his word and credentials up against 34 years IT experience, 19 years in designing, implementing, operating and optimizing enterprise networks, contributions to several IEEE drafts and two CCIE any day.

I never said wireless was better than wired, I would always recommend wired if possible. I never said 1080p over Wireless N was easy, I said it could be done. I've since been ridiculed both ignorantly and consistently. I'm done. If you want further information search avsforum or google - you'll either find helpful information or, as I might suspect given the level of intellect shown in this thread, a lot more liars.

In 12 years on AVS I've felt the need to block one person. One thread, three more added to the list. What a shame.

To the OP, the recommendation stands - buy the Asus, and if you wish PM me for optimization assistance. Or, ask the Netgear guy. Best of luck to you.
Boy what a crank.
1) No one called you a liar.
2) I doubt the OP (or most of us for that matter) want to buy enterprise networking gear.
3) And that's all I was doing. Suggesting a ten dollar wire instead of a couple hundred dollars for wireless.
4) See #1. Pot? Kettle?
Edited by olyteddy - 6/29/13 at 10:29am
post #58 of 60
Is streaming uncompressed bluray over wireless N possible. Sure its possible but it depends on a lot of factors. The first major one being what device are you streaming to. If you are streaming to an htpc that can use better cache and faster cpu to order packets you are much more likely to get 1090p streaming over wifi. If you are using a device like dune/pch/mede8er the chance you actually get it to work is slime to none. These devices have very little cache support, they dont have the speeds to correct out of order packets so they just re request packets. Now you move on to part 2 of the problem, How far are you trying to stream, what material is your house made of what is the room layouts like. So while yes its possible to stream fine over wifi it does not turn out well for the masses.

And my WNDR3700V3 has been spot on never have had a problem with it.
post #59 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by halfelite View Post

Is streaming uncompressed bluray over wireless N possible. Sure its possible but it depends on a lot of factors. The first major one being what device are you streaming to. If you are streaming to an htpc that can use better cache and faster cpu to order packets you are much more likely to get 1090p streaming over wifi. If you are using a device like dune/pch/mede8er the chance you actually get it to work is slime to none. These devices have very little cache support, they dont have the speeds to correct out of order packets so they just re request packets. Now you move on to part 2 of the problem, How far are you trying to stream, what material is your house made of what is the room layouts like. So while yes its possible to stream fine over wifi it does not turn out well for the masses.

And my WNDR3700V3 has been spot on never have had a problem with it.

Thanks for your explanation Halfelite. Yes this is exactly what I meant and experienced. Netgear pays me to comment and monitor the forum to share my own experience and experiences with their products. I am a geek like many of you. I am not an engineer but a geek with access to a bunch of gear who uses it like many of you do or want to. My agreement with Netgear is that I honestly put forth my opinion. If they have a product I like I support it. If I dont I say nothing about it and will not recommend it here or anywhere. The products I suggested here are all products that I use on a daily basis or had been using. I do what you are all suggesting as playing HD media via IP networks. I have everything from ripped Blu Ray discs to downloaded MP4 or MKV files. I have tried all the various combos and know what I can live with and not.

As anyone who lives with this waiting for cache loads, stuttering or freezing are all artifacts of bandwidth limits and not fun. So again my goal is to help and give you all some insight to Netgear and my personal experiences. In addition I relay comments or threads back to Netgear Product Management so they can address issues that may exist or provide enhancements as needed. The AV market is an important client base for Netgear and that is why they make this investment in me.

Lastly Ill say again if you want to stream Blueray you ideally want a wire or go to an AC router and adapter if you can. Otherwise Id suggest lower bit rate files and using 720p over wireless. You can also use 500mbs Powerline that may work with BR. But it can vary and work today and have issue tomorrow based on powerline interference. In fact I will be converting a powerline installation to wired due to dropped performance in my vacation home. Worked great for the past year or so but something changed. So ill be running wire since I cant use AC with a roku! Hope that helps.
post #60 of 60
I ended up buying the Asus AC66U. Best Buy never got the new AirPort Extreme in stock and I need the router by tomorrow.

BB price matched amazon and I had a $30 certificate for a total of $164.
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