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How big is too big?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
First off...love this site and all the good reads in the forums. Love it! Love it!

I am finishing up a new build on a house and set aside an area in our basement so the kids can watch movies, play the wii an xbox, so I can watch sports, etc. The room is 30' deep, 20' wide and 10' ceilings. There is some duct work in the screen wall that gives me a max of 210"...LOL....that would be nuts.

I got the BenQ w1070 and it looks OK on the drywall, but I think I have decided to go for a permanent MDF screen like this one ---> http://www.avsforum.com/t/1148641/new-125-dyi-screen

I would like to sit in the 19 - 20' range for sound purposes, but the kids want a massive screen and don't mind sitting way back at 30'. I want to enjoy good blacks when watching movies, but also watch sports with some ambient light.

What would be the best color mix for this situation and how big of a screen would you go? I've even thought of building as big of a screen that will fit and making an adjustable track system to slide the projector forward for smaller screens. ???
post #2 of 19
Make your life easier and use Drywall over lay. I assure you it will be both less expensive, as well as easier to work with to achieve a very large, perfectly smooth substrate on which to paint.

And go BIG!

The only regret I have is that I didn't catch you earlier on because IMHO, for your use the BenQ W1080st would have been the superior choice.

Imagine having that tremendous sized screen and the Kids being able to crowd it up to 4' away playing wii & XBox without cutting into the beam. THAT's immersive gaming !!!!

Honestly, if your options are still open (...dissatisfaction with PJ choice = return potential..) I'd strongly suggest making the switch.

But iffin' ya can't, then mounting the W1070 as high as possible and at a 12' - 3" Throw, then using the Lens Shift to lower the image will come very close to accomplishing the same thing ( 5' - 6' standing distance...) and give you the potential of having a 138" diagonal screen.


Which you should grab at the opportunity to get! cool.gif


2 10' sheets of 1/2" Drywall. One cut to 10' x 20"

Only 1 long Horizontal Seam to fill / smooth

Skim coat entire surface with Drywall compound and sand smooth. Prime.

Paint with RS-MM-LL using either Roller or inexpensive HVLP

Trim Exterior of screen perimeter with Velvet Wrapped 1" x 3" Poplar
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the quick reply MississippiMan!

What type of primer does everyone use? Anything particular?

Where is the best place to get the paint to mix Maxx Mudd? Can I find these anywhere or will I need to go to a specialty paint store?

RS-MaxxMudd LL v.2.1
(for lower lumen pj's and controlled light home theaters)

20 oz. Rustoleum Metallic Accents - White Pearl
10 oz. Liquitex Basics Silver
12 oz. Behr 1850 Ultra Pure White - Flat

12 oz. Minwax Polycrylic - Satin finish
20 oz. distilled/tap water**
Edited by Craz3d - 6/26/13 at 8:15am
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craz3d View Post

Thanks for the quick reply MississippiMan!

What type of primer does everyone use? Anything particular?

Kilz-2 or Kinser 123 Bulls Eye


Where is the best place to get the paint to mix Maxx Mudd? Can I find these anywhere or will I need to go to a specialty paint store?

RS-MaxxMudd LL v.2.1
(for lower lumen pj's and controlled light home theaters)

20 oz. Rustoleum Metallic Accents - White Pearl Lowes or Menards......or online
10 oz. Liquitex Basics Silver Michael's Arts & Crafts, Hobby Lobby, online
12 oz. Behr 1850 Ultra Pure White - Flat Home Depot

12 oz. Minwax Polycrylic - Satin finish Home Depot, Lowes,
20 oz. distilled/tap water** rolleyes.gif
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks...was still looking for Liquitex just now...out at Hobby Lobby.
Is that Behr a Flat/Matte or a Flat Enamel?

I bought the NoName 2900 HVLP you mentioned in another thread and look forward to trying it out on this project! Would you recommend picking up any needles for it or any other supplies that doesn't come with the kit that I might need?

Also, that recipe that I found for the RS-MM-LL that I pasted above, how far will that go? And do you do more than one coat?
Edited by Craz3d - 6/26/13 at 11:32am
post #6 of 19
You really need to look through the SF / RS-MM Screen painting threads. I'm traveling at present and re-relating available information isn't possible right now.

Get a 1.5 mm Needle. http://www.costcaptain.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=C&Product_Code=DX_HVACV15&gclid=COnK18qtgrgCFYc7MgodTigAvw

The Mix will be enough for you to apply at least 4-5 thin Duster coats as described / instructed.

If you cannot find the info among the many threads on the current board, or no one else who has done the same steps in, I will be able to re-address your request this weekend.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know how far this recipe below will go? I have PM'd a few, but I know they get bombarded and haven't had time to get to mine yet. I need to know soon as I need to place my orders online since it is not available locally and I don't want to overbuy and not be able to return any unopened product.

RS-MaxxMudd LL v.2.1
(for lower lumen pj's and controlled light home theaters)

20 oz. Rustoleum Metallic Accents - White Pearl
10 oz. Liquitex Basics Silver
12 oz. Behr 1850 Ultra Pure White - Flat

12 oz. Minwax Polycrylic - Satin finish
20 oz. distilled/tap water**

All I have found so far in the posts is that it will give a 120" screen plenty of coats. I am doing a 210-220" screen on Drywall and was wondering what multiplier to use on the recipe. I was going to double it and place my orders, but would like to know if anyone has used this recipe on larger screens.

Thanks in advance for any help!
post #8 of 19
OK! I'm on it! (...I can't get no rest....) frown.gif

Mix up this.....

32 oz Pearl (...ya gotta buy it by the Quart anyway...)
16 oz Silver
20 oz 1850
18 oz MinWax
40 oz Water (...use Filtered or Distilled only...)

Total 126 oz. = 1 Gallon -2 oz.

Now go getter' dun, will ya? mad.gif*



(...and yeah...I just did a 220"er on Drywall for a Church with RS-MM-LL, using a 18" Roller. That's right, all ya all...I rolled it on....primarily because the Screen area was surrounded by several thousand dollars worth of Red Velvet Curtains that were 18' high and I wasn't a'gonna try to mask off an entire stage area. I used just under 1 Gallon and did it in two coats over a very well primed white surface. )

* biggrin.gifwink.giftongue.gif
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
You are awesome MM! I owe you for the help...seriously. When I get this beast finished...there will be something in it for you. On a budget of course...LOL!

Just turned in my order for everything but the Behr 1850...a little confused on the right one. Is this it http://www.homedepot.com/p/BEHR-Premium-Plus-1-gal-Ultra-Pure-White-Flat-Enamel-Zero-VOC-Interior-Paint-185001/202761515#.Udxbaay0RrY ?

Flat/Matte or Flat Enamel???

Thanks again! Can't wait to get this project rolling...I mean...spraying. biggrin.gif
Edited by Craz3d - 7/10/13 at 10:51am
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craz3d View Post

You are awesome MM! I owe you for the help...seriously. When I get this beast finished...there will be something in it for you. On a budget of course...LOL!

Just turned in my order for everything but the Behr 1850...a little confused on the right one. Is this it http://www.homedepot.com/p/BEHR-Premium-Plus-1-gal-Ultra-Pure-White-Flat-Enamel-Zero-VOC-Interior-Paint-185001/202761515#.Udxbaay0RrY ?

Flat/Matte or Flat Enamel???

Thanks again! Can't wait to get this project rolling...I mean...spraying. biggrin.gif

Flat enamel is best as far as I'm concerned. It has a slightly better reflectivity quotient, and helps make the surface much more durable...even "wipe-able".

BTW....Please send any / all Pony Kegs to me direct. wink.gif
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Drywall (1/2", 54" x 12') hung and mudded. Let the sanding begin!

Didn't notice until I got to the house site (new home build) that the guy loading the drywall had scraped one of the sections up a bit (the top horizontal piece in the screen). eek.gifmad.gif It was too late and far away to go get another one since I had a friend drive in to help...so we did our best to mud the scrapes. I hope it sands out OK...

Measures out at 220" currently, but will be smaller once I put the border on. I left the tapered edges on the top and bottom since they will be covered. Should come out just under 210". Not sure when I will get to start painting since we are about to go on vacation, but I feel good about the work so far.

I'll post more once the painting starts!

Thanks for all the help so far!!!

post #12 of 19
Even as big as it is, it would be best to apply larger areas of Mud to blend into the repaired areas...or even a Skim coat over the entire surface. Those mud'ded joints do NOT look like they are nearly wide enough. They need to be extended out so that there is at least 6" or more area beyond the center of the joint union, and feather sanded on all edges. Even the small Screw head areas need a larger buffer. Long Tape joints are especially vulnerable to showing up, and spot repairs as well. It is imperative that there be a extended area of "Blending" all around such areas to minimize any chance of seeing a transitional line between such repairs / joints and the non-mud'ded Drywall. Remember...what is acceptable being a "Wall" with flat paint on it will not be so as far as being a High Contrast Screen surface.

Myself, I would do all Joints and Nail / Screw heads (...and any repairs...) first, and get them perfect, then apply a very thin skim coat onto all areas between them. Then very lightly sand the entire surface.

With such a huge screen, you have all the more chance a bad area will distinctly show up.

One thing you do not want to go through is to start painting on a Finish Coat and then see blemishes or defects pop out. Because they will if there, but unobservable until a high contrast surface is applied. If your gonna trust me on anything...do so on this.



I made your day...didn't I? tongue.gif
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Oh boy...yep you made my day and I was afraid of this. eek.gif Just got back from sanding too. Earlier this morning it was dry, so I sanded on this beast before seeing your post. frown.gif Added new layers...dry...sanded more.

The contractor and I held a 5' level over the middle of the joints and it looked super level. When I run my hand over the joint from sheet to sheet...I can barely tell it is there. It is really smooth.

So at this point, can I just put down some super thin mud to make the buffer area larger and feather sand the edges in? Or do I need to mud over these areas with a lot more mud?

If so, any tips on getting a thin coat...what tools? Add water to joint compound to make smoother???
post #14 of 19
Hi.

I'll be gentle.

Your description sounds good. The NO.#1 object is to avoid all rises and bumps, especially those that run continuously. xt are high/low edges around smaller areas. Feathering around all edges, without scrapping raw paper and creating texture (fuzzies), is what makes it possible for a Good primer to cover and lay up a smooth surface.

When primer is sprayed instead of rolled, then Coverage does not equate to "Hiding". There are not 2 or 3 substantially heavier coats that tend to "float" over minor irregularies. Nope, your just going to get it "White". Then...as stated before, when the high gain-High Contrast paint goes up, and irregular rise or dip...smooth into Fuzzy.....even slick sanded Mud into plain Drywall.....

.......if those area are there, odds are against you not seeing them after the 1st to 2nd coats of Finish paint goes on. And the finish coats are even less intended to "Fill" or "Hide", so 4-5 Dusters will only highlight such errors all the more.

This all leads to two (2) choices at this point.*

  • If the area/s are adjudged smooth and with no tactile difference in smoothness and Feathered edges, your good to spray on diluted Primer as Duster Coats...3-4 will do. Great practice for what is to come as the same 3' sec pace w/75% row overlap used with Silver Fire applies to Primer coats as well.
  • You apply a skim coat over / across the raw drywall areas, blending them 3" - 4" into the just sanded areas . That coat is "skimmed....that is scraped away until you almost see the Drywall. But not quite.. It's actually easier than trying to apply and level thicker coats. The object is to apply a like material across the entire area so that a final sanding assure a wholly equal and consistent texture.


...................then you do the Spray Prime / Spray SF thingee.smile.gif


*
Note
: If you use Lightweight Drywall Compound it should be smooth and "Plastic-y"...not "Cake-y" or "Runny", and using a 8" Knife, just load the Knife with a 6" wide x 2" tall Ridge of Compound and pressing it firmly at a 10 degree angle against the wall...smooshing it out, proceed to sweep the area so that a very thin coat is applied. Repeat. Fill in your bare areas. Then sweep scrape the surface with light strokes of a clean Knife. , knowing that your leveling and thinning, not really trying to "remove". You don't overdo any area....scrape 2x and move on. Sanding will finish the job.
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
So...I think I will take my vacation whilst this screen "sets up" good...lol. Then I'll go buy more beer, mud mix and some new knives...and give'er heck!

I'll get it right...just might take some time! I won't let you down MM! cool.gif
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craz3d View Post

So...I think I will take my vacation whilst this screen "sets up" good...lol. Then I'll go buy more beer, mud mix and some new knives...and give'er heck!

I'll get it right...just might take some time! I won't let you down MM! cool.gif

Vacation, eh?

BooYa!
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
So after a vacation, super busy farm work (we have a farm and hay season came around & brush hogging & selling, etc.), countless hours of painting our basement rooms (wifey wanted to save money on the build by painting - not worth it! LOL), and many evenings of sanding, sanding, and more sanding...with a hint of sanding around other sanding...LOL biggrin.gif I have completed the Behemoth! I think it is ready for the primer and paint. See what you think now MM. Does it look worthy of the next step?



I have no fuzzies or massive dips or bumps...she's as smooth as a baby's butt. I can feel some rises here and there but not very many and it looks good when I throw an image on it. I looked it over good from all angles and distances with a plain blue screen and saw no flaws. Anything else I should do before painting?


post #18 of 19
Impressive indeed. I'd feel safe in saying your ready to squirt, so grab your Tool in hand and give it a go.

............but do find something to practice getting your Flow rate and technique down pat first.....
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Awesome...sounds good. Thanks again!
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