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Using AVR for dedicated stereo. Does it really that sucks?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
So I've upgraded my dedicated home theater receiver to Marantz SR5007. After some tweaking and tinkering I found the result to be quite satisfactory.

Now my old receiver is well .. old .. it's a Yamaha RX-V659 and besides for having no HDMI input, 4k upscaling, passthrough, Airplay and all shiny bells and whistles it's actually a fine receiver to me.

So there is this idea that I would use this Yamaha for dedicated stereo amp. I'd get an Airport Express to make it an Airplay station, and also a pair of decent floorstand and plug them to my Yammy.

Then my friend came and laughed, or to be exactly cynical to my idea.

"YOU DON'T USE AV RECEIVER FOR STEREO PURPOSE. YOU JUST DON'T" is what he essentially said.

So the question is:

Does AV receiver really sounds that bad and lowly for dedicated stereo? It sounds fine to me when I was using it as stereo and surround amp. What's so magical about dedicated stereo amp? I don't know, I just want to repurpose my old and unused Yamaha.
Selling it was a pain and potential buyers proven to be so cheap, so I'd like to reuse it instead.

But from what my friend said. Wow, am I really stupid and missing a lot by using my AVR as dedicated stereo amp?

Your feedback and opinions are greatly appreciated. Thank you.
post #2 of 7
No, not generally, at low volumes, for efficient speakers 8Ω or more, not your receiver if it sounds fine to you, but you're asking here where the prevailing opinion is 'all amps sound the same unless driven to clipping or protection shut down or defective or proven otherwise in a double-blinded trial'.

That said, generally power amps boast greater max. power ratings (it's afterall their selling point) and if you have tower speakers with large woofers or 4Ω or less impedance some entry-level budget receivers weighing only 15lb would struggle at moderate or high volumes.

Heavy power amps lovers, esp. Emotiva and Bryston tend to lavish praise on their amps and how the sound improves, opens up, soundstage deepens etc.

If you have a 2.1 set-up and digital source then a receiver would be ideally suited to do bass management and room correction (which is generally considered a must-have around here). You wouldn't deliberately seek a receiver if it's only for 2.0 or only for vinyl but you already have an old one and it's perfectly ok to use it.

So it depends...
post #3 of 7
Like he said ^ ... It should be fine. cool.gif
post #4 of 7
After finally switching to an AVR from a stereo receiver for my 2 channel setup I would never go back. Well, that is until manufacturers realize that many like to add .1 with a little help from their receiver. The AVR's capabilities to seamlessly integrate a sub and take the load of full bandwidth from my speakers has made a big improvement.
post #5 of 7
Receivers can sound fine. Disregard the audiophool snobbery and make a decision based on what you hear. Like others have alluded to, the most comprehensive tests undertaken would suggest there is little to no difference.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSayuSay View Post

So I've upgraded my dedicated home theater receiver to Marantz SR5007. After some tweaking and tinkering I found the result to be quite satisfactory.
...

Then my friend came and laughed, or to be exactly cynical to my idea.

"YOU DON'T USE AV RECEIVER FOR STEREO PURPOSE. YOU JUST DON'T" is what he essentially said.

....

Get a new friend smile.gif

Alternatively, keep him (I assume it is a "him"), but understand that he has poor understanding of what amplifiers do (and has a "sucker" sign glowing on his forehead when he walks into an audio store).

Here are the specs for your RX-V659: http://www.audioholics.com/reviews/receivers/yamaha-rx-v659/rx-v659-measurements-analysis

Unless you have some particularly weird and inefficient speakers, or your stereo room is the size of a football field, it is far more likely that you will reach the point of irreparably damaging your hearing (and your relations with the neighbors) way before you reach the limits of the receiver.
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Oh well thank you for your opinion. So I keep my RX-V659 and get a Wharfedale Diamond 9.5 for $200 a pair, connect it to my PC and Airport Express ($40 for the first gen) using two optical inputs available.

Voila .. it's a great stereo system indeed albeit "only" using AVR! And it does Airplay too for so little $$
Thank you people.
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