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"The Bridge" on FX HD - Page 2

post #31 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

That would probably be ok for you, since you can read and speak the language. It would be quite a roll of the dice for me and I'm pretty sure gwsat. LOL Please keep us informed if you find any of those subtitle Easter Eggs.

How about : http://english.megastore.se (Not sure if they ship outside Europe - but there's a large Swedish ex-pat community in the Far East so it wouldn't surprise me if they did)
post #32 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

NPR Fresh Air has a review of "The Bridge" posted up.

After hearing some of the dialog from Kruger in the review I'm really starting to wonder if she is going to pull it off, she doesn't sound anywhere near as socially deficient as Saga was in the original. Just a short clip though so I'm still hoping for the best.

What I love about the Scandinavian stuff is that so much is left unsaid, but clearly communicated to the audience. That's why I didn't make it past the first commercial break in the US remake of The Killing. Everything was overly scripted in comparison.

Interesting that Diane Kruger (who is German) has been cast, just as Joel Kinnaman (who is Swedish/American) was cast in The Killing.
post #33 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post

What I love about the Scandinavian stuff is that so much is left unsaid, but clearly communicated to the audience. That's why I didn't make it past the first commercial break in the US remake of The Killing. Everything was overly scripted in comparison.

Interesting that Diane Kruger (who is German) has been cast, just as Joel Kinnaman (who is Swedish/American) was cast in The Killing.

I love Kruger. There is no more beautiful actress alive and she is talented too. I fell in love with her as a result of her performance with Ed Harris in the criminally underrated Copying Beethoven and she hasn't done anything since that has disappointed me.
post #34 of 482
One of my rules of thumb for cable shows nowadays is that if it's on AMC or FX, I'm in. Doesn't really matter what the subject is although I can say I've seen enough cop shows to last a lifetime so I'm not altogether thrilled about the subject of this one. But if you want to see serious TV done right (for the most part), these two non-premium networks rule over all right now. I think the only show I've missed recently was Lights Out on FX and that didn't last beyond the first season.
post #35 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowbiscuit View Post

One of my rules of thumb for cable shows nowadays is that if it's on AMC or FX, I'm in. Doesn't really matter what the subject is although I can say I've seen enough cop shows to last a lifetime so I'm not altogether thrilled about the subject of this one.

I feel the same way. Two many of these cop shows to keep up with; wasn't a problem when they were all procedurals (I didn't watch any of 'em). I love serialized drama but there's got to be some triage. Think I'm going to have to skip this one. frown.gif
post #36 of 482
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

wasn't a problem when they were all procedurals (I didn't watch any of 'em). I love serialized drama but there's got to be some triage. Think I'm going to have to skip this one. frown.gif

I think the phrase "be careful what you wish for" comes to mind here. wink.gif
Edited by VisionOn - 7/9/13 at 1:01pm
post #37 of 482
Thread Starter 
Review: FX's 'The Bridge' a gripping look at crime on El Paso/Juarez border
Cops Diane Kruger and Demián Bichir investigate a serial killer
By Alan Sepinwall Tuesday, Jul 9, 2013 2:00 PM HitFix


Many elements of FX's new crime drama "The Bridge" (it debuts tomorrow night at 10) may seem familiar. One of its two main characters, El Paso homicide detective Sonya Cross (Diane Kruger) suffers (undiagnosed) from Asperger's syndrome, putting her into good, if socially clumsy, current company with the likes of Temperance Brennan on "Bones," Will Graham on "Hannibal" and both the Cumberbatch and Miller versions of Sherlock Holmes. It will spend most of its first season dealing with the pursuit by Cross and Mexican cop Hector Ruiz (Demián Bichir) of a baroque serial killer, which invites immediate comparisons to "Dexter," "Hannibal," the current season of "The Killing" and virtually every other serial killer-obsessed cop show of the moment. And it is, like "The Killing," a remake of a popular Scandinavian series, "Bron," which was set on the border between Denmark and Sweden.

But what makes "The Bridge" special, and potentially great, is an attribute more often applied to real estate than TV drama: location, location, location.

When Meredith Stiehm, the creator of "Cold Case" and one of the best writers on "Homeland" seasons 1 and 2, was tasked with adapting the series, the instructions were to begin on the bridge connecting Detroit and Windsor, Ontario, or another spot where America and Canada touch. But Stiehm and partner Elwood Reid had our other border in mind, and successfully argued to set their version in El Paso and Juárez. And that choice, and what Stiehm and Reid do with it, makes all the difference in helping "The Bridge" stand out.

So, yes, our heroes are chasing yet another serial killer who targets women (and, at times, men) and does unspeakable things to them, but it's a killer who's making a very specific socio-political point about the disparities between the city to the north of the border (which the killer notes averages 5 homicides a year) and the one to the south (where thousands die).

"Why is one dead white woman more important than so many just across the bridge?" he asks in a taunting message left for the cops. "How long can El Paso look away?"

Cross' difficulties demonstrating empathy or reading social cues, meanwhile, only become magnified when she has to partner up with Ruiz, a warm and outgoing man who comes from a completely different cultural context than the one she's used to. It's a buddy cop show pairing of opposites with a genuine reason for the two to mistrust and misunderstand each other.

And the series seems at least as interested in depicting its fictionalized take on the two border cities as it is in following Cross and Ruiz's investigation into the murders taking place in both.

Stiehm has told me that the goal is to turn "The Bridge" into a series dealing with all corners of life in El Paso and Juárez, using this series of murders as a way into that world in the same way "The Wire" used its initial drug investigation to tell the story of Baltimore as a whole. To that end, we meet not only the cops (including Ted Levine as the El Paso homicide lieutenant Hank Wade); but an El Paso trophy wife (Annabeth Gish) whose husband has been up to shady dealings across the border; a pair of reporters (Matthew Lillard and Emily Rios) looking into the killings while also letting us see the dire straits of the local news media; Ruiz's wife (Catalina Sandino Moreno) and son (Carlos Pratts), who cross the border each day to work and study at a Texas college; and Steven Linder (Thomas M. Wright), a sketchy character who lives in a desert trailer and has an intense interest in the women of Juárez.

The murder investigation touches many of these peoples' lives — Linder(*) is presented as an early suspect for the audience, if not for the cops — but there are also instant story possibilities raised by each character intersection, and by the way the series depicts its reluctant twin cities. Though much of the series is actually filmed in Southern California, there's an immediate sense of place to its version of El Paso, and especially to Juárez. Even if "The Bridge" were to stay a simple police story, there would be enormous promise just in the faulty assumptions each cop makes about the other: Ruiz works in a place where police corruption is treated as a given, while the Mexicans view Cross' department as dismissive and contemptuous of anything that happens on the wrong side of the bridge.

(*) Wright is an Australian actor who made an impression earlier this year as Elisabeth Moss' lover in the fantastic Sundance miniseries "Top of the Lake." Here, he's unrecognizable in bushy sideburns and speaking with a marble-mouthed American accent that makes him sound like... well, like a certain serial killer famously played by his new co-star Ted Levine. It's a big performance, to say the least, and how I feel about it will ultimately come down to whether or not he's the killer or a red herring.

It can't be overstated just how charming Bichir (Oscar-nominated a couple of years ago for "A Better Life") is as Ruiz, who lives a shambling but largely honest existence, just trying to get through another day (this case begins shortly after a vasectomy that gives him an amusing bowlegged walk), completely baffled by this strange American woman who's become his new partner. It's a marvelous, totally natural performance, and a necessary contrast to the iciness of Kruger as Sonya Cross.

The writers and Kruger are walking a very high and narrow tightrope with Sonya, whose particular brand of social clumsiness — extremely literal, brusque, unable to maintain eye contact without great effort — fits many Asperger's profiles, but which makes it questionable that this particular woman would rise as high as she has in the department, and be placed at the center of such a sensitive investigation. Sonya's also portrayed as intuitively brilliant, and it's clear that Hank has been protecting her for years, but Kruger commits to such an intense, remote take on the character that it feels on occasion like a miracle that she's even gotten this far, let alone that she'd be given this important assignment. Like a few other components of "The Bridge" (including a good ol' boy fellow El Paso detective who strays perilously close to caricature) Sonya feels like she could plummet off the rope at any moment, but she remains aloft through the first three episodes.

Our understanding of television storytelling, and the way we talk about it, has changed so much over the years that I often wonder how successful a serialized mystery story can be in this day and age. By the time Stiehm, Reid and company unveil the killer's identity and motives, odds are everyone who cares will have talked all the possibilities to death online, and will either be disappointed that it isn't someone they picked, or find it unsurprising if it is.

The way to work around that problem is to offer the audience so much beyond whodunnit that the mystery's resolution ultimately won't matter that much. With these characters, with this fascinating, complicated place — and one that's at the forefront of so much of what we're talking about in real world politics — and the sense of atmosphere instilled by directors like Gerardo Naranjo, "The Bridge" is off to such an outstanding start that I can't wait to see what this creative team does not only with the rest of the serial killer story, but well beyond it.

http://www.hitfix.com/whats-alan-watching/review-fxs-the-bridge-a-gripping-look-at-crime-on-el-pasojuarez-border
post #38 of 482
Thanks to VisionOn for the piece posted above. It seems as if the show will put as much or more focus on its environment than it will on the Murder of the Week. If it works out that way I will be pleased. Another thing that has me looking forward to this show is the excellent Demián Bichir as the Mexican half of the American-Mexican cop tandem searching for the serial killer. Bichir was wonderful on Weeds as the charming but thoroughly crooked mayor of Tijuana. It seems as if he has been given a role worthy of his considerable talents in The Bridge.
post #39 of 482
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

Thanks to VisionOn for the piece posted above. It seems as if the show will put as much or more focus on its environment than it will on the Murder of the Week. If it works out that way I will be pleased.

I'm glad Sepinwall mentioned The Wire, because that was my hope when I started reading some of the earlier reviews about the location and political context. If this show starts dealing with the locale and the elements within the show could spin out into something with a lot of potential.

Justified doesn't use it's locale as much as it used to but at least it keeps some local flavor in the characters and tone. In the early days Harlan was a bigger character. Maybe The Bridge can keep that idea more up front.
post #40 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

I'm glad Sepinwall mentioned The Wire, because that was my hope when I started reading some of the earlier reviews about the location and political context. If this show starts dealing with the locale and the elements within the show could spin out into something with a lot of potential.

Justified doesn't use it's locale as much as it used to but at least it keeps some local flavor in the characters and tone. In the early days Harlan was a bigger character. Maybe The Bridge can keep that idea more up front.
I agree, I was very interested to see him say that as well as there is a treasure trove of material that can be mined in that very particular area of both countries.
post #41 of 482
Read a piece by the estimable Andy Greenwald about The Bridge today. Greenwald is loving it and it made me look forward to the pilot more than ever.
post #42 of 482
Wow, that was really, really good! Great cast and storyline.

I'm guessing the dead husband is apart of the killings. The locked phone and the strange lady calling him.
Marco's captain lives like a drug lord or something. Maybe he needs a lot of protection since he's a high authority of the police department. Could be wealthy because of the bribes too.

Nice to see Ted Levine playing Lieutenant Hank Wade. He's a great actor.

I'll be watching next week for sure.

Edit: It's not over! ha

Very cool ending. Creepy eek.gif
Edited by Young C - 7/10/13 at 8:26pm
post #43 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young C View Post

Wow, that was really, really good! Great cast and storyline.

I'm guessing the dead husband is apart of the killings. The locked phone and the strange lady calling him.
Marco's captain lives like a drug lord or something. Maybe he needs a lot of protection since he's a high authority of the police department. Could be wealthy because of the bribes too.

Nice to see Ted Levine playing Lieutenant Hank Wade. He's a great actor.

I'll be watching next week for sure.

Edit: It's not over! ha

Took me a minute to figure out who Ted Levine was: He's use to working with unorthodox investigators smile.gif
nn: http://pro.imdb.com/name/nm0505971/ nn: http://pro.imdb.com/name/nm0001724/ pp: Steve Wilkie cp: 2002 USA Network

Edit: Also, the Medical Examiner was Ida from 'The Middleman'.
Edited by rebkell - 7/10/13 at 8:58pm
post #44 of 482
What was up with the hidden room in the basement on that ranch property? I think I noticed somebody inside looking out to the lady and the ranch caregiver? Maybe illegals or criminals are locked inside? Doubt it's like a horror movie and some deformed monster is hidden inside tongue.gif

Great show, can't wait till next week.
post #45 of 482
a few minutes into it I brought up this thread and read some reviews - helped explain why Diane Kruger's character was acting a little off... If you want to know check out the 1st page.

Ted Levine's voice is unmistakable - didn't watch Monk so it was odd seeing him in another role. I kept saying "put the lotion in the basket" every time I heard him speak.

b/c it's on FX I'll give it a few more episodes to make a final decision if I want to get invested into it or not. I need something to hold me over until SOA and Justified comes back on.

overall, a pretty good opening episode with some interesting twists and turns.
post #46 of 482
A little worried about the viewership. Nobody's replying in this thread. Maybe most people had schedule conflicts and will catch it via the DVR this weekend.

Edit:
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGAd13 View Post

a few minutes into it I brought up this thread and read some reviews - helped explain why Diane Kruger's character was acting a little off... If you want to know check out the 1st page.

Ted Levine's voice is unmistakable - didn't watch Monk so it was odd seeing him in another role. I kept saying "put the lotion in the basket" every time I heard him speak.

b/c it's on FX I'll give it a few more episodes to make a final decision if I want to get invested into it or not. I need something to hold me over until SOA and Justified comes back on.

overall, a pretty good opening episode with some interesting twists and turns.

That's funny tongue.gif
His voice is indeed very unmistakable.
post #47 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young C View Post

A little worried about the viewership. Nobody's replying in this thread. Maybe most people had schedule conflicts and will catch it via the DVR this weekend.

I saw it and liked it, as expected from a show airing on FX. There are many interesting characters already who have potential for lots of depth.

As an aside, Diane Kruger is very cute in acting out her character's disorder.
post #48 of 482
I'm definitely coming back for more. I love that they're using an actual Mexican actor to play, you know, a Mexican. I can see myself getting quickly frustrated if they push the mysterious backstory too hard, whatever that's officially called, like with the ranch room and the seemingly disconnected multiple plot elements. Looks like they're going to use Levine as more than a placeholder, so that's nice.

It also seemed like they put a 1 hour show in a 90 minute slot - not so much the length of the breaks, but the program sections were very short seemed to me. I know that's what they do now, but it seemed worse than usual, and I was surprised when it was over sooner than expected.
post #49 of 482
Loving it so far. Great cast, especially Demián Bichir. If he was interested I think he could get more work on this side of the border.
post #50 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSmith83 View Post

I saw it and liked it, as expected from a show airing on FX. There are many interesting characters already who have potential for lots of depth.

As an aside, Diane Kruger is very cute in acting out her character's disorder.
Her behavior should become far more accurate for one who is afflicted with Asperger's as the producers hired an expert in the affliction, but his input isn't seen until the second episode going forward. Apparently many of the Hollywood depictions of the affliction are inaccurate and the producers wanted to get it right.
Quote:
All of which is not to say the show is perfect in its depiction of autism spectrum disorders. The pilot felt the shakiest of the first three episodes and the least fluid in the expression of Sonya’s autism. There were moments of tremendous self-possession and confidence that jaggedly switched to somewhat stereotypical robotic dialogue. This may be explained by the fact that FX filmed it before hiring Alex Plank, the founder of WrongPlanet.net, a highly popular online community for people on the spectrum, to be a consultant on the series.

Under Plank’s guidance, the show made changes, like giving Sonya a stim and making her smile, as opposed to having only a stereotypical blank stare throughout the pilot. Still, it was important to Plank that her autism remain unstated and subtle in its expression. “I feel with FX, AMC, HBO, you don’t have to beat them over the head with everything,” he said. “ I don’t tell everyone at work I’m autistic. Her character definitely wouldn’t tell everyone.”

http://www.salon.com/2013/07/11/finally_a_realistic_autistic_character_on_television/?source=newsletter
post #51 of 482
If you want to see a woman of accomplishment with autism, just watch a Temple Grandin video - there's lots to choose from. Here's a short one ...



Edit to embed the vid - haven't been able to do that for some time, but figured it out ... kind of.
Edited by fjames - 7/11/13 at 6:19pm
post #52 of 482
I loved every minute of the pilot. Can't remember the last time I saw any episode of a serialized show that combined writing and performances that matched the quality of the The Bridge pilot. Both Dianne Kruger and Demián Bichir were incredible. Kruger broke my heart as the Aspergers suffering detective, Sonya North. She has utterly no social skills, knows it, but tries to soldier on anyway because of her commitment to her job. I thought how afraid and lost she looked when her lieutenant, who is clearly her anchor, told her he was thinking about retiring was very sad. Kruger is doing a great job of combining her ice queen beauty with serious acting chops to present a picture of a lost and tortured cop who just wants to do her job but is sometimes her own worst enemy.

Demián Bichir was a wonder too. A world weary Mexican cop, who despite his native cynicism, has been hooked by a series of bizarre killings. The guy could charm the birds out of the trees. When he was having the conversation, in Spanish, with his female colleague who needles him about his vasectomy, I laughed. The high point of the conversation came when when he conceded to his colleague that he didn't know whether Sonya acted like she did because she was a little crazy or because she was a gringa. Great stuff, which proved that the writing of the Spanish dialog is as brilliant as the writing of the English.

I also loved Ted Levine as the lieutenant. What a warm, smooth, and appealing fellow! I also was impressed by the actor who plays the weird but brilliant serial killer. I confess, though, that I have no idea who plays the part.
post #53 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by fjames View Post

If you want to see a woman of accomplishment with autism, just watch a Temple Grandin video - there's lots to choose from. Here's a short one ...

There is a great movie/documentary/biography in which Claire Danes plays Temple Grandin. It's available on HBO Go and HBO On-Demand.
Edited by rebkell - 7/11/13 at 9:50pm
post #54 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwsat View Post

I also was impressed by the actor who plays the weird but brilliant serial killer. I confess, though, that I have no idea who plays the part.

From the FX show page,
Quote:
Thomas M. Wright is an actor, writer and director from Melbourne, Australia, who has started gaining international recognition for his recent work, including a leading role opposite Elisabeth Moss in Jane Campion’s Top of the Lake for the Sundance Channel/BBC.

His film work includes the role of ‘Thomas Bodenham’ in Van Diemen’s Land (2009), and as murdered journalist Brian Peters in Robert Connolly’s Balibo (2009), which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival. Wright’s previous television work includes Matthew Saville’s The King (2007) and numerous primetime series.

A versatile performer, Wright has strong foundations in theatre. In 2006, he founded The Black Lung Theatre and Whaling Firm and under that banner has written, produced and directed numerous award-winning productions.

He has played lead roles with the Sydney Theatre Company, the Melbourne Theatre Company and the Malthouse Theatre and directed co-productions for a number of the mainstage companies including the Queensland Theatre Company and the Belvoir St. Theatre. In 2011, he portrayed the title role for the Malthouse Theatre and the Sydney Theatre Company co-production of Baal, a performance that garnered critical attention.

In 2012, he produced and directed Doku Rai (you, dead man, I don’t believe you), a production created in East Timor with local companies Liurai Foer (King Bin) and Galaxie. The show has been presented at the Darwin Festival, the Adelaide Festival and in Melbourne, and will continue to Sydney and the Brisbane Festival later this year. Doku Rai has been nominated for production of the year and named one of the best productions of 2012 from numerous bodies.

I saw him in the above referenced "Top of the Lake" and he was very good, in fact he was just one of several very good performances in that series, if you haven't seen it I highly recommend it. As far as him being the serial killer, I don't believe we've seen him kill anyone yet.
post #55 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

Took me a minute to figure out who Ted Levine was: He's use to working with unorthodox investigators smile.gif
nn: http://pro.imdb.com/name/nm0505971/ nn: http://pro.imdb.com/name/nm0001724/ pp: Steve Wilkie cp: 2002 USA Network

Edit: Also, the Medical Examiner was Ida from 'The Middleman'.

Perhaps you'd remember him better as this character:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQb2m6VJ-eo
post #56 of 482
Watched it last night. Wasn't sure about this show from the previews and still wasn't hooked during the first hour, but the last half hour kept me interested enough to come back for more. There is a lack of stuff on right now so I'll give it a good chance.

Waiting for my season 5 DVD of Damages to arrive to also get me through the Summer and Breaking Bad is just a few weeks away.
post #57 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Young C View Post

A little worried about the viewership. Nobody's replying in this thread. Maybe most people had schedule conflicts and will catch it via the DVR this weekend.

3 million viewers for the first airing and another million for the second airing. People are watching.
post #58 of 482
Good readings. I like all the information about the autism spectrum disorder information.
post #59 of 482
Watched the show and liked it. I hated the Sonya character early on, but she got a bit better as it progressed. She was very annoying, and I really liked how Demian bummed her out at her desk, as he couldn't sit down. [A taste of her own medicine}. Compare her to Chloe O'Brien from 24, who I liked immediately and enjoyed through the whole series. So far, for me she is no Chloe, but she is cute.. Demian Bilchir makes the show for me so far. He did a terrific job in the pilot, Always good to see and hear Ted "Frank Holman" Levine. Hope we see him a lot. Good to also see a quick SOA spot, coming in September.
post #60 of 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Lucca View Post

I hated the Sonya character early on.......... She was very annoying.

She ruins the show for me. I'll try a couple more episodes, but she is VERY annoying, disorder or not. I hope my tolerance for her gets better, because the rest of the show was interesting.
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