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How much $$ did you spend on tools to build your theater ??? - Page 2

post #31 of 159
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post

I think I'm at about $2k - $3k
I like buying tools though

Most expensive was ~$700 for a miter saw

That's a nice miter saw biggrin.gif

What kind ? Like it ?
post #32 of 159
I paid $550 for my compound miter saw and it was worth twice that, IMO! I bought a Hitachi 10" compund slider from the recommendation of a friend of mine who it a professional cabinet maker. The saw is fantastic and I am thinking of buying another just so I don't have to un-bolt the one I have (in my woodshop) to take it down stairs or to a rental or remodel. I would very easily recommend it to a trim guy...and that is saying something!

Here is a link to the model I bought (I don't know the seller, just this saw) http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hitachi-10-in-Sliding-Dual-Compound-Miter-Saw-C10FSBP4-NEW-/330936859994?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4d0d5fbd5a#ht_2865wt_1399
post #33 of 159
Thread Starter 
I am looking for a good saw for cutting full sheets of MDF or plywood. Any suggestions?

Table saw sucks for that. Especially without any help.
post #34 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

I am looking for a good saw for cutting full sheets of MDF or plywood. Any suggestions?

Table saw sucks for that. Especially without any help.

The obvious choice would be a track saw. Or a panel saw.
post #35 of 159
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by djkest View Post

The obvious choice would be a track saw. Or a panel saw.

I can't find one that's reasonably priced frown.gif
post #36 of 159
Just use a circular saw to get close and then finish up at the table saw.
post #37 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by BllDo View Post

Just use a circular saw to get close and then finish up at the table saw.

+1. I use this technique all the time. 1/4" of waste isn't a big deal and it's quick.
post #38 of 159
You can get by with an 8' straight edge, two clamps and a good circular saw.
post #39 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by BroncoSport View Post

You can get by with an 8' straight edge, two clamps and a good circular saw.

I built 100 fabric panels using this method, with 2 tv trays serving as sawhorses. That's just how I roll.
post #40 of 159
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BroncoSport View Post

You can get by with an 8' straight edge, two clamps and a good circular saw.

Yup! Thanks !!

This will work smile.gif
post #41 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

I can't find one that's reasonably priced frown.gif

Check my build thread.

I bought a Bosch Circular Saw and a Kreg Circular Saw Guide
A++++++

I cut probably close to 60 sheets with it.
There are some limitation in size but it worked great for me
post #42 of 159
Thread Starter 
Limitation in size ??? You mean how big a sheet ?
post #43 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

I built 100 fabric panels using this method, with 2 tv trays serving as sawhorses. That's just how I roll.

100 cuts on tv trays? You , my friend roll HARD ! When I don't have sawhorses and a bunch of sheets to cut the same size, I stack , square the sheets , and cut on the pile . Cuts several sheets at once , and usually scribes the last one for a guide for the next bunch . The last sheet(s) are put on 2 of the cut pieces to elevate for the final cut.
post #44 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

Limitation in size ??? You mean how big a sheet ?

Yes you're limited on the size cut but I always found a way around it.

It works very nicely when you need multiple pieces that are the exact same size
post #45 of 159
Thread Starter 
I'm thinking that I will just use a straight edge and hand saw.

Table saw is great but not for 4x8 sheets. I never get a super straight cut. The wood is just to hard to move. Easier to move a saw over the wood than the wood over the saw.

My next quest is a router table. I'm struggling with this one big time frown.gif
post #46 of 159
I can only speak for Home Depot as I purchased several pieces of 4x8 material there but they can rip the sheets down to the size you need or just rip it in half to make it more manageable on a table saw. I cut sheets both with a straight edge/circular saw and with a table saw and I can say that I much preferred the table saw. It was at least 5 times faster (probably more) at making repeated cuts and twice as fast to make different width cuts. I also didn't have to worry about how I was going to make that last cut of the sheet if the pieces I was cutting were narrow (like if I were cutting pieces for fabric frames). True, a table saw can be expensive and takes up real estate when your storing it but for ripping sheet goods it can't be beat. I lucked out and borrowed my Dad's but only after spending way too much time trying to use the guide and circular saw approach.
post #47 of 159
The straight edge + circular saw approach will get you most of the way there, but there are still times a table saw is nice to have. Any time you need to rip something less than say 10", it gets tough with a circular saw. You need enough space for the shoe of your saw + your straight edge. You can use the guide along the narrow side of the shoe, but then the wide part of your shoe is on the piece that's going to fall when you're finished.

It's a compromise, for sure. It just depends on what you need to do as to whether it will work for you or not.

That said, I'd love a track saw!
post #48 of 159
anyone who can't afford a table a saw needs to make a 4 ft and an 8ft DIY circular saw rip guide. See Youtube.
post #49 of 159
Thread Starter 
I'd love a track saw too but I can't find any for a reasonable price and I already own two table saws (Full size + job site ) and also a two Circular hand saws (Dewalt Corded and a Ryobi Cordless )

I'd spend a few hundred on a track saw, but I can't spend $500+ mad.gif
post #50 of 159
I have the Makita track saw. I think I have $650 invested in the saw, two 54 inch Makita track sections, Festool track joiners to make it one long track, Dewalt track clamps and a track carry bag. It is interesting how all the pieces from various vendors work together.
post #51 of 159
I have a 4ft DIY rip guide and it works well but like JPA said once you get below a certain size the space needed for a guide and saw eat up too much space. Even with the rip guide you still need 4-5" to be able to clamp the guide to the material.
post #52 of 159
I can't really see the usefullness of a track saw for me. If I'm getting the sheet goods at either HD or Lowes, I try and get it cut to rough size there. Other times, I'm buying at places that don't have panel saws available. Then a circular saw get me most of the way there and then the table saw to get the finish size. I also have a infeed table for managing large or long sheets through the table saw.
What I'd love to have is nice sliding table saw.
post #53 of 159
Just to be clear, I'm not saying you HAVE TO HAVE a table saw. Just be aware that there are some situations that a rip guide and circular saw are not going to be convenient (see vanice's post above). You can get around this, but end up with extra waste because you have to cut the smaller pieces off of a larger piece.

Again, just pointing out something you may not have considered. A man has to work within his budget. If you don't have the funds for a table saw, or you think it is better spent somewhere else, then you will find a way to do what you need to in lieu of a table saw. Just be sure whatever you do is safe. At least as safe as you can be when spinning carbide teeth are involved smile.gif
post #54 of 159
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

Just to be clear, I'm not saying you HAVE TO HAVE a table saw. Just be aware that there are some situations that a rip guide and circular saw are not going to be convenient (see vanice's post above). You can get around this, but end up with extra waste because you have to cut the smaller pieces off of a larger piece.

Again, just pointing out something you may not have considered. A man has to work within his budget. If you don't have the funds for a table saw, or you think it is better spent somewhere else, then you will find a way to do what you need to in lieu of a table saw. Just be sure whatever you do is safe. At least as safe as you can be when spinning carbide teeth are involved smile.gif

I do have two table saws. I had them all my life, my dad owns a full size I grew up with. These days the gate is not super straight anymore though. I bought a smaller table top version for my house. I'll have both when I do my theater. The big one in the garage below, and the table top in the theater itself. Lumber will be stored in the garage so I can cut it down there and carry up the cut piece or I can cut it in the room.

Just for both- Sheets of 4x8 MDF suck to rip. Making speaker boxes is a pain in the asssssssss..... The stuff is so heavy and hard to move. I think a straight edge with hand saw makes more sense.

Table saws are nice to have, but they are better at most other cutting than they are for ripping MDF. I'll use them for that stuff. I am more worried about ripping 4x8 sheets. It's hard because the wood is so big and it's so heavy. I struggle with it every time.
post #55 of 159
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I have the Makita track saw. I think I have $650 invested in the saw, two 54 inch Makita track sections, Festool track joiners to make it one long track, Dewalt track clamps and a track carry bag. It is interesting how all the pieces from various vendors work together.

This is one of those big expenses for a small single project.

I am envious of you, but I doubt I'll find much need other than my theater build for a $600+ investment. I do want biggrin.gif
post #56 of 159
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vanice View Post

I have a 4ft DIY rip guide and it works well but like JPA said once you get below a certain size the space needed for a guide and saw eat up too much space. Even with the rip guide you still need 4-5" to be able to clamp the guide to the material.


Agreed.

Thin cuts I do on table saw with guide and fence. That's a no brainier. It's the wood that is too big or heavy to manage easily that is my issue.
post #57 of 159
Thread Starter 
What is the difference between a track saw and a panel saw ? The panel saw sets up and stays ? I've had HD rip my MDF in half (like Big suggested ) for me and they have one right there in the department. Makes it much easier than a table saw. I guess a track saw you can set up on the wood and adjust it ?
post #58 of 159
A track saw is portable and you put the track where you want to cut, A big panel saw like HD is fixed in place. Also a track saw usually has a plunge function which can be useful in cutting out a hole where you need a nice straight cut.
post #59 of 159
I consider the Dewalt track saw one of the best tool purchased I've made. However the festools/dewalts/makita systems are a little pricey .

I've never used one but an alternative that has been getting decent reviews on some of the woodworking forums may be the EZsmart system.

http://www.eurekazone.com/default.asp

Using your own saw/router you could get into a system for < $200 and expand as funds permit.
post #60 of 159
Sounds like all you need is a straight edge, then.
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