or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Plasma Flat Panel Displays › Plasma OK for Outdoors? (Gets COLD in Winter!)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Plasma OK for Outdoors? (Gets COLD in Winter!)

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Plasma or LCD/LED for outdoors???

Will be in shaded area.
Looking to go 60" or greater.

Thank you!

TM
post #2 of 10
LCD/LED for sure..

I would not trust the temperature changes with a glass panel.
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shady195 View Post

LCD/LED for sure..

I would not trust the temperature changes with a glass panel.

^This

Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk 2
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shady195 View Post

.... I would not trust the temperature changes with a glass panel.

Why not? House windows don't crack or break at low temperatures in the winter so i don't see why a glass plasma panel would be at risk.

From the ST60 manual - Operating Conditions - Temperature: 32 °F - 104 °F (0 °C - 40 °C), Humidity: 20 % - 80 % RH (non-condensing).

I imagine there are no TVs (Tube, LCD, LED LCD, Plasma, etc) that are rated for use below 32 °F so i don't think LCD would have any particular advantage in cold conditions.
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyWalters View Post

Why not? House windows don't crack or break at low temperatures in the winter so i don't see why a glass plasma panel would be at risk.

From the ST60 manual - Operating Conditions - Temperature: 32 °F - 104 °F (0 °C - 40 °C), Humidity: 20 % - 80 % RH (non-condensing).

I imagine there are no TVs (Tube, LCD, LED LCD, Plasma, etc) that are rated for use below 32 °F so i don't think LCD would have any particular advantage in cold conditions.

It does not have so much to do with the temperature but the rapid changes.

Most windows/Sliding doors etc are thick tempered glass, or dual pane tempered glass. I've seen both crack due to a rapid temperature change lets say when a Thudnerstorm hits and the temp drops rapidly.

I am not 100% sure if Plasma is tempered glass or not, but I know its much more fragile than most doors and windows.. I've seen them crack/break under way lass then I have seen a glass door.

Factor in temprature changes, humidity/condensation etc.. Really I wouldent put a TV outside perminately anyways unless it was just a really cheap unit however I feel that LCD would have far less change of having panel issues than Plasma
post #6 of 10
post #7 of 10
Deleted duplicate post.
post #8 of 10
I think the key part of this entire endeavor that has not been discussed is not the panel but the electronics. Even if the glass panel might be able to handle the temperature swings, that does not mean anything if the morning dew or frost short out the electronics. (The humidity ratings in Randy's post are extremely relevant.) A regular consumer grade plasma was not meant, nor designed, to be in that operating environment. Additionally, by being outdoors you will expose the unit to greater temperature swings between on/off cycles and the repeated thermal expansion and contraction will greatly increase the chances of other circuit board chicanery.

Anything you save up front will inevitably be offset by the manufacturer denying warranty coverage due to improper use. Do yourself a big favor and just spend the extra money on a product like Eric has pointed you towards. These products have the additional cost because it costs money to properly prepare electronics equipment for outdoor use.

P.S. I've personally experienced a circuit board that had a broken trace and would only work when the temperature of the board was high enough to let the trace expand and close the break. Since then, the elimination of lead in solder and the general miniaturization of electronics has only made these circuits more fragile outside their intended operating environments.
Edited by Phatal One - 7/1/13 at 9:15am
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phatal One View Post

I think the key part of this entire endeavor that has not been discussed is not the panel but the electronics. Even if the glass panel might be able to handle the temperature swings, that does not mean anything if the morning due or frost short out the electronics. (The humidity ratings in Randy's post are extremely relevant.) A regular consumer grade plasma was not meant, nor designed, to be in that operating environment. Additionally, by being outdoors you will expose the unit to greater temperature swings between on/off cycles and the repeated thermal expansion and contraction will greatly increase the chances of other circuit board chicanery.

Anything you save up front will inevitably be offset by the manufacturer denying warranty coverage due to improper use. Do yourself a big favor and just spend the extra money on a product like Eric has pointed you towards. These products have the additional cost because it costs money to properly prepare electronics equipment for outdoor use.

P.S. I've personally experienced a circuit board trace that had a broken trace in and would only work when the temperature of the board was high enough to let the trace expand and close the break. Since then, the elimination of lead in solder, and the general miniaturization of electronics has only made these circuits more fragile outside their intended operating environments.

Also agreeing with what Phatal said, I tried to touch on it in my previous post but did not really clarify when I was mentioning the humidity/condensation. Thats what I was aiming for (panel electronics)

That would be a big concern, if this is to be left outdoors at all time I would not spring for a nice new TV, id find something used/cheap or as Eric posted, something rated to be outside.
post #10 of 10
At very low temperatures (-20C or lower) consumer LCD panels will freeze, resulting in permanent distortion to the LC matrix leading to mura -- dark unevenness, or cracks in the panel. Below 10C the picture motion blur will be terrible, around 100ms G2G (strongly exponential with decreasing temp.)

A plasma display's electronics should work reliably down to -25C possibly even -40C, however, you would need to avoid condensation.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Plasma Flat Panel Displays
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Plasma Flat Panel Displays › Plasma OK for Outdoors? (Gets COLD in Winter!)