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DIY Monitor Advice

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I was thinking of building some DIY speakers. The speakers are 60% movies, 40% music. I was thinking of maybe the Eaton S 7 or, Seas Iduun 2, or the (Jim Holtz) Statement Monitors. Anyone have experience with comparing any of these speaker kits or building them? I considered buying used B&W 805D or similar monitors but building your own is much less expensive and more satisfying. Room size is roughly 14ft wide, 18ft deep, 8 ft. ceilings in a basement. I plan on building a 7 ch. Surround system with a 15” sub when finished. Any questions or comments?
post #2 of 11
Have you looked at diysoundgroup.com ? They have some nice speaker kits.
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
I already built QSC 2150 but those things are huge tanks and very loud, I was hoping for something more detailed in the mids and highs. Im not worried about bass. I have 2 15" subwoofers for that. Also something easier on the eyes, I may leave a pair of these speakers exposed.
post #4 of 11
Small 2-way bookshelfs work great as near field monitors. If accurate vocals and highs is a priority, Jed has a design on htguide.com that uses the fountek ribbon tweeter and tang and W4-1337 mid, but without the woofer like the statement monitor has. If small, nearfield use isn't required, go with statement monitors.
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I'll check that out...
post #6 of 11
I think those Statement monitors are going to be hard to beat. The main question is, do you have the ability/skill/knowledge to construct a crossover? Do you have measurement equipment? If not, then I would go for a proven design that someone else has already built. That way you can just clone it.

If you know a thing or two about building crossovers, and if you are interested in a totally new design, then that would be awesome! You could always go active, but even that requires quite a bit of crossover skill in order to do it right,

Have you decided on a budget for the drivers? I like the Fountek neo3.0cd that is used in the Statements, or if you want to step it up a notch, you could go with a high end tweeter and mid-range drivers from the likes of ScanSpeak, or some other high end component manufacture.

I am looking forward to seeing your ideas and concepts come to life!
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
I do not have the skill or knowledge to build a crossover from scratch. When I built the QSC 2150 I purchased the assembled crossover, Ill do the same thing if I build the statements. Once I see it built im pretty good at reverse engineering. Honestly I have been eyeing the statements for over a year. The ONLY reason I built the QSC 2150 was because I could buy all the parts OEM. All I had to do was build a box and plug and play. I recently found out I could buy a built statement crossover and drivers from Meniscus. Had I known this earlier I would have built the statements instead of the QSC. It looks like I'll be building some statement monitors and maybe even the statements in the near future. Once I learn alittle more about crossover design I'll attempt a build from scratch.. smile.gif
post #8 of 11
Why bother with learning crossover design when Curt has already done the work? One of the best parts about a kit (or proven design) is it allows you to focus time and energy on building/finishing the cabinet instead of geeking out on the crossovers.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by mobeer4don View Post

Why bother with learning crossover design when Curt has already done the work? One of the best parts about a kit (or proven design) is it allows you to focus time and energy on building/finishing the cabinet instead of geeking out on the crossovers.
Some people like to build an engine themselfs and have an auto body shop do the body work. Others like to drop in a crate engine and do their own body work. It's all a hobby and learning more about something is never a bad thing.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by mobeer4don View Post

Why bother with learning crossover design when Curt has already done the work? One of the best parts about a kit (or proven design) is it allows you to focus time and energy on building/finishing the cabinet instead of geeking out on the crossovers.


For me, I actually get some self satisfaction out of knowing that I was the one who built this speaker, by myself. To me, that is what makes this hobby so fun, which is knowing that I am using my smarts/brain-power to completely bring a speaker to life, with only having help in the design process. That is super fun!
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
I'm interested in knowing how and why the speaker works. I started building my first computer when the 486 pc's were introduced. I wanted to upgrade my ram and reinstall windows. At that time it was a few hundred dollars. I said the hell with that, a friend helped me at first and I took off from there. It was ridiculous what they were asking to install a stick of ram. I just cannot justify the cost of some these speaker. Im willing to spend $1,000 or more for a pair of speakers provided they perform like a commercial pair costing $4,000 or more. and if something breaks down the road, Ill know how to repair it vs. paying some tech hundreds for a few dollars in actual repair costs. I already built a DIY 15" PE sub which was really easy, now im looking for more. biggrin.gif
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