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Is there really any point in soundproofing? Is it a scam? Help me gain clarity please !!! - Page 2

post #31 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

Great advice !! thank you!

One thing I am struggling with is understanding the true cost of soundproofing relative to it's real world value to me.

I don't even know if I understand how much clips and channel and GG will cost me yet. I'm trying to work through all this stuff now- as you can tell.

Ted can answer the cost questions for you. I think once you have a better idea of overall cost, the other decisions will become easier.

Let me ask you this. Since you already have a pretty nice setup in your bedroom, have you found yourself wishing that room was soundproof? Do outside noises disturb you during movies? Do your neighbors consider you a menace? Will the location of your new theater be better or worse in regards to noise impact? Perhaps your current setup/experiences can help answer some of the questions you have regarding real world value.
post #32 of 85
Here are my 2 (or 3) cents:

1)As far as I am aware, decoupling primarily serves to lower the resonant frequency of the wall. Therefore it is primarily useful in improving the soundproofing in the bass frequencies. If you are only concerned with external sounds, I suspect this is overkill. At a minimum, If I were you I would at least do a double layer of drywall, and pay attention to sealing of the room edges and penetrations.

1a)That being said, you are talking about a large project here, and the cost adder on doing soundproofing correctly is maybe a couple thousand dollars. It might be penny wise pound foolish to skip it.

2)If you are concerned about external noises, you should also be primarily concerned with the sound of your HVAC, and the sound of your projector, because these sounds will likely be much louder in the room than ambient sounds from outside the room. Doubly so because of the location you are building the room (above the garage). Unless you want to be able to run your lawnmower in the garage and not hear it smile.gif

One concern might be a central vac - do you have one in the garage? If so, you should move it rather than trying to soundproof against it.

3)Anyone who thinks going single layer of drywall now and upgrading to double layer in the future because its "relatively easy" to do is delusional smile.gif

EDIT: Just read the part about your hearing issues and the $10K budget. Honestly, IMO I wouldn't worry about soundproofing too much. Maybe like I said do two layers of drywall instead of one - you'd be amazed at how much that mass doubling does for you. You will already be insulating for thermal reasons. Room treatments will also result in a perception of the noise floor in the room being reduced.
Edited by kromkamp - 7/3/13 at 10:28am
post #33 of 85
Here is my 2 cents. I followed the soundproofing methods suggested here (Room within a Room, double drywall with green glue, backer boxes, silen seal, etc...). The system definately works along with in room sound acoustic treatment, it is simply the most amazing sounding theater. Yes, it is alot of effort and expense, but the results are awesome.
post #34 of 85
LOGANATOR: "Getting LOGANED happens. There is nothing you can do about it. It might be today; it might be never. When it happens; it happens, Little Grasshopper."
Little Garasshopper: "But, how will I know when it happens?"
LOGANATOR: "You'll know."
Little Grasshopper: "But, oh great Sage LOGANATOR, HOW?"
LOGANATOR: "When you have to ask yourself, "Have I been LOGANED," then you've been LOGANED."
Little Grasshopper: "But, what If I never ask myself."
LOGANATOR: "THEN you've been LOGANED."
post #35 of 85
One small thing to add to the mix is IF you don't soundproof and get equipment to play sound at reference levels....will the neighbor hear the LFE as well??? Could be an issue. Just thinking out loud.
post #36 of 85
I considered the same thing as you. We also live in a very quiet neighborhood, and are at the very end of the street in a cul-de-sac. The noisiest things around are usually the birds. I could make comments about how loud my wife's heels sound on the hardwood upstairs from my basement, but when I watch a movie, if she is home, she watches it with me. So I thought for a while that if I did soundproofing, what would I be soundproofing from?

Well we also do lots of entertainment. We like to host parties and have lots of people over quite often, and people bring kids. This is one case where it has been amazing. Throw on a movie like Cars, close the door, and the kids no longer exist. I don't hear a word or a part of the movie anywhere else in the house. That is an excellent example of "Keeping the noise out".

Then you get to treatments. If you care about the sound quality in the theater, you want to start with a level playing field. Standard walls don't give you that. If you are someone who things putting some Bose speakers on a wall is the best thing you have ever heard (I couldn't tell you the number of times I've heard people use that exact example... OMG HAVE YOU HEARD THOSE BOSE SPEAKERS???) then you probably could care less about anything even involving treatments. But just being in a soundproofed room with nothing playing is obvious. All of the background noise you tune out on a daily basis that you don't even realize that you are listening to vanishes. Your ears almost pop. From there the only noises are the ones in your theater, and those are the noises you want to treat. Even a single super-quiet fan can become distracting when you get to that point, which is a reason a lot of people talk about the audible volume of their projector fans and why they like hush boxes. It's for the sake of clarity.

But you are also are correct that it is only what matters to you. Once you have watched a movie in a 'proofed and treated room, it really changes your perception of what a good theater is. My theater is no where near perfect, but every one of our friends who has come over is blown away by it. Just a thought!
Edited by damelon - 7/3/13 at 1:06pm
post #37 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BllDo View Post

Just giving you a hard time. I appreciate your enthusiasm here as well as in the HTPC areas. I'll definitely be sub'd when you get your build thread going.

I know wink.gif No need to apologize! biggrin.gif

I am not made of glass tongue.gif

Thanks again for the comments and advice.
post #38 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Ted can answer the cost questions for you. I think once you have a better idea of overall cost, the other decisions will become easier.


It's on my to do list. I do plan to do something but I am trying to get an idea and some info before I I call a pro. Probably after this thread runs it's coarse was my plan actually.
Quote:
Let me ask you this. Since you already have a pretty nice setup in your bedroom, have you found yourself wishing that room was soundproof? Do outside noises disturb you during movies? Do your neighbors consider you a menace? Will the location of your new theater be better or worse in regards to noise impact? Perhaps your current setup/experiences can help answer some of the questions you have regarding real world value.

No. The answer is no. No one complains about theater now in a non sound proofed room. I have window AC unit even, and that is the side of the house closest to my neighbor. The total opposite side is where I am building the garage and theater and there is a lot of room between the 1 house at the end of my street.

The location of the theater will be better than now. The noise isn't a problem now. That's why I am not seeing the full value or benefit in my situation. I'm just afraid of doing it wrong so I think I want to do a high value sound proofing just in case. That seems like the best solution for me. I clearly don't need extreme sound proofing and also doing none at all might be a mistake.
post #39 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kromkamp View Post

Here are my 2 (or 3) cents:

1)As far as I am aware, decoupling primarily serves to lower the resonant frequency of the wall. Therefore it is primarily useful in improving the soundproofing in the bass frequencies. If you are only concerned with external sounds, I suspect this is overkill. At a minimum, If I were you I would at least do a double layer of drywall, and pay attention to sealing of the room edges and penetrations.

1a)That being said, you are talking about a large project here, and the cost adder on doing soundproofing correctly is maybe a couple thousand dollars. It might be penny wise pound foolish to skip it.

2)If you are concerned about external noises, you should also be primarily concerned with the sound of your HVAC, and the sound of your projector, because these sounds will likely be much louder in the room than ambient sounds from outside the room. Doubly so because of the location you are building the room (above the garage). Unless you want to be able to run your lawnmower in the garage and not hear it smile.gif

One concern might be a central vac - do you have one in the garage? If so, you should move it rather than trying to soundproof against it.

3)Anyone who thinks going single layer of drywall now and upgrading to double layer in the future because its "relatively easy" to do is delusional smile.gif

EDIT: Just read the part about your hearing issues and the $10K budget. Honestly, IMO I wouldn't worry about soundproofing too much. Maybe like I said do two layers of drywall instead of one - you'd be amazed at how much that mass doubling does for you. You will already be insulating for thermal reasons. Room treatments will also result in a perception of the noise floor in the room being reduced.

Thanks for a really helpful reply!

I think you hit the nail on the head with #1. I care much more about sound getting into my theater than I do with it leaving the theater. There is very little "bass" in my area. No traffic or cars. No planes. I am second last house on dead end street in quiet neighborhood. There is woods and then an old age home behind my house. Almost nothing in front of it. I have only 2 neighbors. One is 65 year old single nice guy who is quiet and we get along great. Other side is a cute family with kids but the house is a good distance from mine. But I do have ordinary house noises- but even those are not in close proximity. I am second floor and furnace will be basement and central air is planned outside. Washer and dryer won't be close, dishwasher is in kitchen a floor down. I do want sound proofing just in case - I'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

HVAC is a concern. I'll need to deal with that when it comes up for sure. I need to wait to see how it is run first. My guess will be I sacrifice a closet and run up to attic then drop down into all the second floor rooms. My set up should aid in my quest for low sound I think.

Projector will likely also be sound proofed in a hush box I build.

I won't have central vac. I am not set up for it now and I don't have excess budget anyways.

I do own a drywall lift and I've done it many times. I not planning on doing it for this project given how big it is- it's just easier to have a pro do the whole thing. I would not want to do it after the fact either. My woodworking is probably going to take a year to complete- and once done I am not tearing it off the walls again.
post #40 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlogan6797 View Post

LOGANATOR: "Getting LOGANED happens. There is nothing you can do about it. It might be today; it might be never. When it happens; it happens, Little Grasshopper."
Little Garasshopper: "But, how will I know when it happens?"
LOGANATOR: "You'll know."
Little Grasshopper: "But, oh great Sage LOGANATOR, HOW?"
LOGANATOR: "When you have to ask yourself, "Have I been LOGANED," then you've been LOGANED."
Little Grasshopper: "But, what If I never ask myself."
LOGANATOR: "THEN you've been LOGANED."

I guess I will know when I know biggrin.gif
post #41 of 85
Couple other thoughts:

1)Make sure to get regular 5/8" drywall, not the "light" drywall.

2)Make sure to run HVAC supply/return to your projector hushbox for cooling.

3)The "fabric wall" isn't what makes the room sound good, its the treatments behind the fabric. Your best bet would be to run your design by Dennis using the AVS theater service ($600) and he will come up with a treatment strategy with locations for treatments.
post #42 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by damelon View Post

I considered the same thing as you. We also live in a very quiet neighborhood, and are at the very end of the street in a cul-de-sac. The noisiest things around are usually the birds. I could make comments about how loud my wife's heels sound on the hardwood upstairs from my basement, but when I watch a movie, if she is home, she watches it with me. So I thought for a while that if I did soundproofing, what would I be soundproofing from?

Well we also do lots of entertainment. We like to host parties and have lots of people over quite often, and people bring kids. This is one case where it has been amazing. Throw on a movie like Cars, close the door, and the kids no longer exist. I don't hear a word or a part of the movie anywhere else in the house. That is an excellent example of "Keeping the noise out".

Then you get to treatments. If you care about the sound quality in the theater, you want to start with a level playing field. Standard walls don't give you that. If you are someone who things putting some Bose speakers on a wall is the best thing you have ever heard (I couldn't tell you the number of times I've heard people use that exact example... OMG HAVE YOU HEARD THOSE BOSE SPEAKERS???) then you probably could case less about anything even involving treatments. But just being in a soundproofed room with nothing playing is obvious. All of the background noise you tune out on a daily basis that you don't even realize that you are listening to vanishes. Your ears almost pop. From there the only noises are the ones in your theater, and those are the noises you want to treat. Even a single super-quiet fan can become distracting when you get to that point, which is a reason a lot of people talk about the audible volume of their projector fans and why they like hush boxes. It's for the sake of clarity.

But you are also are correct that it is only what matters to you. Once you have watched a movie in a 'proofed and treated room, it really changes your perception of what a good theater is. My theater is no where near perfect, but every one of our friends who has come over is blown away by it. Just a thought!

Hi Damelon,

Thanks for the advice. I've read through your theater build so it's helpful and appreciated to hear your feedback. I do want a quiet room, and I plan to do fabric panels on the upper 2/3rds of the walls. I am interested in some type of sound treatments for sure, and I do value how good the room can sound.

I too plan on entertaining, which is the reason for the bar in the back and the extra size of the room. One issue I am having is about soundproofing the back bar area. I'd love to be able to have mirrors, black lights behind the bottles, tile on the bar top, nice finished wood etc... But I know it won't sound as good as a fabric wall. I am playing around with the concept of a pull curtain to close off the bar area when I am home alone and enjoying movie night myself. Locating the back speakers might be tricky .. hmmmm Just thinking out loud. biggrin.gif

I am definitely not someone who appreciates BOSE speakers tongue.gif Probably going to do some type of SEOS design DIY.

BTW-- Your theater might not have an echo but I think your keyboard does wink.gif
post #43 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kromkamp View Post

Couple other thoughts:

1)Make sure to get regular 5/8" drywall, not the "light" drywall.

2)Make sure to run HVAC supply/return to your projector hushbox for cooling.

3)The "fabric wall" isn't what makes the room sound good, its the treatments behind the fabric. Your best bet would be to run your design by Dennis using the AVS theater service ($600) and he will come up with a treatment strategy with locations for treatments.

I would for sure get 5/8" DW. Possibly X2 with GG. I think I have decided to stagger the studs on the walls. I am trying to figure out the real costs of all this so I can weight the decisions.

Are you saying I need a dedicated supply and return just for the hush box ? What about when the heat or AC is not on ???

I was thinking I could PVC pipe up into the attic space and use a cheap PC fan to pull hot air out of the hush box ?? Stupid idea?

I have not figured out the hush box issue yet.

I was also planning on treating the entire upper 2/3rd of the wall - everything above the wood third. Then I could treat hot spots or reflective points when I tune the room. Stupid idea?
post #44 of 85
I've built 2 theaters with no soundproofing.
First one didn't have any acoustical treatment, either -- results were weak, mainly no bass control.

Second one had good acoustical treatment (designed by Rives Audio). It sounds very nice, but I really notice the noise floor, and I'm surprised the neighbors didn't complain.

My new one (designed by Erskine Group) will be Whisper Clips, DD & GG, with seals on the doors, etc. I would defer electronics purchases to get the room built properly, and then buy the fancy electronics when I can afford them.

Don't skimp on the sound control -- just my 2 cents.
post #45 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

...One issue I am having is about soundproofing the back bar area. I'd love to be able to have mirrors, black lights behind the bottles, tile on the bar top, nice finished wood etc... But I know it won't sound as good as a fabric wall. I am playing around with the concept of a pull curtain to close off the bar area when I am home alone and enjoying movie night myself. Locating the back speakers might be tricky .. hmmmm Just thinking out loud. biggrin.gif

Make sure to not confuse "Soundproofing" with treatments. The fact that you have tile or mirrors in your room doesn't really have any impact on your soundproofing, that's all in the walls. I am pretty sure you mean acoustical treatments though, and yes, lots of large reflective surfaces can cause issues with fine-tuning your room. All the more reason to hire a professional. People like Dennis Erskine, Bryan Pape, etc can take design input like that and work with it.
post #46 of 85
In case you are not convinced yet.

You are willing to pay for SQ but not sure if soundproofing is worth the cost in your situation. Well, you know or should know that 2 layers of sheet rock with GG between does an excellent job of base damping, per Dr. Earl Geddes (www.gedlee.com). Typical sound panels don't damp bass very well, they're really only useful for cutting down (early) reflections. Building real bass traps is much harder and they take up significant space. Better to do the GG thing and not need them.

Or so Dr. Geddes says. I haven't done it yet but I plan to. I'm also planning a 2nd floor theater room. My dilemma is the room is already finished and I want to get it damped and sound proofed with least deconstruction. If I care only about bass damping I just add the 2nd layer of sheetrock with GG. To get sound proofing also I either need to use clips or a 2nd stud wall. Studs seem a lot cheaper than clips.

My advice is to take the money you had budgeted for acoustic treatment and use it for a 2nd layer of sheetrock with green glue. And of course put fiberglass insulation behind the sheetrock to damp the cavities.

Its a good thing you don't care about sound going down into the garage below. Treating the floor is harder, more expensive than treating the ceiling....
post #47 of 85
Analysis paralysis. I think we all suffer from this.

My view for highest ROI is this: Double stud wall (24" OC) the room to avoid clipping walls and just clip the ceiling. Putty/duct seal (cheaper) the electrical boxes, no pot lights (avoid backer boxes), cheapest fibreglass insulation you can find in walls, acoustic seal all 5/8 drywall seams and at ceiling, floor, and corner intersections, as well as electical box perforations. Test with in 2.1 set up and crank it up. Play for a while. Good enough? If not, then add GG and 2nd 5/8 sheet of drywall.

Disclaimer: I'm just another AVSer who's read everything he could find as well, and haven't completed my build yet.

I'd do this if I had your objectives and wanted to avoid any regrets later. Looking forward to your build thread.
Edited by Swervepf - 7/3/13 at 9:08pm
post #48 of 85
Thread Starter 
Oh I like the idea of playing a system and testing- Then adding a second layer with GG if needed smile.gif

I could do that easily.

I am wondering what performs better:

Staggered studs and 1 layer of sheetrock

Normal studds and two layers of sheetrock + GG ??

Anyone know ?
post #49 of 85
Staggered studs or clips and channel, then 2 layers of 5/8 DW w/GG. Just do it. The truth is that none of us can really quaitify the value proposition here. I, for one,, am taking Dennis Erskine's advice at face value.
post #50 of 85
I just cut a pasted this from another post I made .... I know, not the elegant way it is supposed to be done; but, so be it.
Quote:
People think "very quiet" is library quiet...about 33 to 35dB. Movies think quiet is 22dB. In a room not sound isolated, the difference between the noise floor in the (very quiet) room and the softest sound on a sound track is right around a factor of 8. So, not a problem right? Just turn up the volume to hear soft dialog, foot steps, leaves in the wind. That's fine; but, having done that, normal dialog and "normal" sound is also going to be played back 8 times louder...not so fun. The loud sounds...also 8 times louder and, in many cases, beyond the capability of mid-level amps and speakers.

For the record, those with hearing loss or even tinnitus benefit more from lowered noise floors (and good acoustics) than those with good hearing now (which will be pretty bad hearing in the future due to an overly loud movie or gaming room).

"I have poor hearing. I don't need sound isolation or good acoustics." That is nothing more than rationalization and horse poo-poo.

You know that 8 times louder thing? Guess what? It makes others in your home and the neighbors 8 times more angry.
post #51 of 85

Dennis,

 

Thanks for re-posting your quote.  I have moderately-severe hearing loss and I am only 43 (many bad choices in my younger days).  People keep telling me how stupid it is to waist all of this time and money on acoustic treatments and soundproofing when I will never experience the benefit.  I keep trying to explain that it is ambient noise that makes me turn up the sound.  I appreciate your confirmation of my theory.

 

Nick

post #52 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

I would for sure get 5/8" DW. Possibly X2 with GG. I think I have decided to stagger the studs on the walls. I am trying to figure out the real costs of all this so I can weight the decisions.

I don't believe you have specified your room dimensions anywhere? It would be pretty easy to estimate how much extra drywall, how much GG, how many clips and channel for the ceiling. Assuming you will DIY all of it. Like I said, probably you are looking at a couple thousand extra, maybe $1500 extra.

I have built two home theaters now - one with double drywall and Green Glue, and one with double drywall, green glue, and decoupling. I have a decent idea of the incremental improvement that decoupling offers. I also have a good amount of experience with what DD+GG alone offers. I strongly disagree with anyone recommending decoupling instead of double drywall. That's just my opinion. but it is one informed from personal experience.
Quote:
Are you saying I need a dedicated supply and return just for the hush box ? What about when the heat or AC is not on ???

That's the way I would do it. I have the fan in my HVAC running continuously at low speed even when not calling for heat or cold, for better air circulation. You could do what you are suggesting with a small fan though as well - just keep in mind the intake air for the hushbox is now a sound penetration into the room (you don't want to pull air from the attic)
Quote:
I was also planning on treating the entire upper 2/3rd of the wall - everything above the wood third. Then I could treat hot spots or reflective points when I tune the room. Stupid idea?

Again, my advice would be to use the AVS/Dennis Erskine service to advise you exactly where treatments are required. Then you will know.

By the way, I strongly disagree with JackNC's suggestion to skip acoustic treatment in favor of double drywall. This will absolutely not give you a good sounding room. If you have to choose (cost wise) between soundproofing and acoustic treatments, choose the latter.
post #53 of 85
Thread Starter 
Ok I think you guys have all clearly shown me at least some value in soundproofing. Enough to make me decide I want to do it. But I still don't think I need the extreme treatment- and a normal or value approach will likely be satisfactory. I also don't have a big budget.

I am thinking staggered studs on the walls (better than clips ?)
Clips on ceiling (my ceiling is not flat- does that matter ? Could I just do two layers of DD and GG to save cost ?
Probably a floating type rubber mat or something on the floor. How important is the floor ? Does carpet and extra layers of wood help ? Advice?

Now I need to learn or figure out what methods are best for me given my goal and budget and use it to develop a solid plan.
post #54 of 85
Talk to Ted White at soundproofingcompany (also on this forum) about a vaulted ceiling with clips/channel - there may be some differences in installation. Really, talk to Ted about all of your questions!

2 layers of DD and GG are what 99.% people do - very few people do a triple layer of drywall. You can do 50% coverage of GG to save costs if you like.

Cheers
post #55 of 85
If you call Soundproofing Co and they try to transfer you to Ben Dover who wants to sell you $5 Whisper clips for DD, be skeptical. Apparently their own testing shows that the IB clips available at a fraction of the cost perform on par with the whisper clips with when DD is used (due to the extra wright on the clips).

They're going to give you advice on what products you should buy from them, so it's like going to the Ford dealer to get advice on buying a car (not that Ford makes a bad car, or you would be unhappy with one). In my experience, they're going to try to sell you as much as they think you can afford, so cry poor. On the plus side, they provide great support for the products they sell. Their SIM guides are better illustrated than some of the stuff you have pay for elsewhere. So not a bad place to buy stuff if you've already decided on the products they sell. Also keep in mind, their opinions on soundproofing & acoustics don't always match up with other experts. That's not to say it's them vs experts, just that soundproofing & acoustic are sort of like religion with different schools of thought on certain things.
post #56 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kromkamp View Post

I don't believe you have specified your room dimensions anywhere? It would be pretty easy to estimate how much extra drywall, how much GG, how many clips and channel for the ceiling. Assuming you will DIY all of it. Like I said, probably you are looking at a couple thousand extra, maybe $1500 extra.

Final plan is being determined as we speak. Right now it looks like Garage will be 34 x 24 and thus the theater above it would be the same 34x24. That is the foundation size.

The walls I hope to make 10ft. I plan to have built in reverse soffit in the ceiling and joist design so instead of going down on the sides to make a soffit I am going up in the center to 12 feet. The ceiling might get tricky. I was thinking if worse case I might just do double DW with GG and call it a day on the ceiling.

The ceiling is not finalized. I could do something else. I just like the idea of the extra height. Since it's a peaked roof I have that option to go higher in the center. It lends well to a big star ceiling and open feeling.
Quote:
By the way, I strongly disagree with JackNC's suggestion to skip acoustic treatment in favor of double drywall. This will absolutely not give you a good sounding room. If you have to choose (cost wise) between soundproofing and acoustic treatments, choose the latter.

Room treatments and the room sounding good is much more important than soundproofing. I just was a relatively low noise floor in the theater with great sound. That's all I want. I am leaning towards the idea clips are not good for my situation, it seems hard to do, more expensive and so far nothing I find shows they work all that well compared to staggered studs.

Is it much harder to do outlet boxes and stuff with double DW ?
post #57 of 85
The thing about putting acoustic treatments ahead of sound isolation, is that you can always go back and add treatments to a room. It's very difficult to go back and put clips/GG/DD in an existing room.
post #58 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by greedo View Post

The thing about putting acoustic treatments ahead of sound isolation, is that you can always go back and add treatments to a room. It's very difficult to go back and put clips/GG/DD in an existing room.

I should note I care equally about how awesome it will look. For this reason- Acoustic treatments must be thought about and planned for up front so it works with the room appearance.

I was hoping that doing fabric frames on the upper 2/3rd for the walls with sound treatment material behind them would be a good start. Also treating behind my false screen wall. The back will be harder because of the open design and wetbar area, but I was toying with an idea where I could curtain off that section if I wanted optimal performance. Is that a stupid idea ? I could build the curtains into a column or between them or something.
post #59 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

The back will be harder because of the open design and wetbar area

By open do you mean that your room will have no doors, completely open concept?
post #60 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by greedo View Post

The thing about putting acoustic treatments ahead of sound isolation, is that you can always go back and add treatments to a room. It's very difficult to go back and put clips/GG/DD in an existing room.

Hard to add clips yes, but adding second layer of drywall with Green glue is very doable. Just does not make sense to do this because of all of the lost finishing of the drywall and paint.
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