or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › A/V Control & Automation › Home A/V Distribution › Utilizing "future" cat5e drops in new home for Ethernet and home network
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Utilizing "future" cat5e drops in new home for Ethernet and home network - Page 2

post #31 of 44
I've read the standards and T568A is the preferred for all applications. T568B is allowed if deemed necessary for certain applications.

And to repeat, your statements suggest the you are making some sort of connection between the standards -A, -B, -C and the wiring schemes T568A/T568B.

To continue to suggest the folks should follow an out of date and non-preferred (and soon to be deprecated) practice just because it's been done that way for a long time is not a very convincing argument.

I was taught a lot of things in school that are no longer taught for many reasons. Lots of "facts" were passed out in school that we now know are wrong. Even today our knowledge in many, many fields is constantly being updated.

And to suggest the T568B is more suited for phone use really defies common sense.

And I was installing Ethernet using thick and thin a long time ago.
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcwilt View Post

And to suggest the T568B is more suited for phone use really defies common sense.
I would say so. It isn't any more or less suitable for the purpose than T568A as far as i am concerned. Neither was intended for POTS and neither makes sense to me considering the way POTS lines are normally terminated, although T568A at least has the second pair in the same place as Ma Bell expects it for a RJ14.
Quote:
And I was installing Ethernet using thick and thin a long time ago.
Me, too, and everything in between that and the current versions.
Edited by Colm - 7/7/13 at 9:38pm
post #33 of 44
This thread was supposed to help the OP connect his LAN. A or B will work. B will not work for a person paying for 2 phone lines and plugs in a 4 pin cord in a 8 pin jack. A 6 pin Keystone should have been used to cut down on the confusion. I have phone and LAN Keystones on my wallplates. Once the wife said the phones were out. She had plugged the phone into the LAN Keystone.
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm View Post

Me, too, and everything in between that and the current versions.

Somebody else who remembers thick and thin? I don't feel quite so old anymore wink.gif

Don't suppose you ever did any ARCNET?
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skytrooper View Post

This thread was supposed to help the OP connect his LAN. A or B will work. B will not work for a person paying for 2 phone lines and plugs in a 4 pin cord in a 8 pin jack. A 6 pin Keystone should have been used to cut down on the confusion. I have phone and LAN Keystones on my wallplates. Once the wife said the phones were out. She had plugged the phone into the LAN Keystone.

It must just be that way of things but when doing installs everything gets labeled without issue but in MY home? Haven't gotten around to it yet. Go figure. rolleyes.gif

In regards to the OP he needs to stick with T568A for his wall jacks since the Leviton board he is using is T568A.

And while you can often insert a 6P4C or 6P2C plug into a 8P8C jack some manufactures warn that you may damage the jack. They can be designed to work together but not all are. JFYI.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by fcwilt View Post

Don't suppose you ever did any ARCNET?
Nope, no hands on with ARCNET, although I remember the technology.
post #37 of 44
So, the take away from this thread is that a given segment of cabling needs to be terminated the same way on both ends. In the case at hand, that apparently means T568A for the cable punched down to the Leviton board. That does not mean that a cable plugged into that board, or any other cable in OP's system, has to be terminated to T568A. In fact, if he is using pre-terminated patch cables, they are in all likelihood terminated to T568B, and that is just fine.
post #38 of 44
Sooo.....


Did the OP ever get this to work in his home or did the bickering scare him away?
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm View Post

So, the take away from this thread is that a given segment of cabling needs to be terminated the same way on both ends. In the case at hand, that apparently means T568A for the cable punched down to the Leviton board. That does not mean that a cable plugged into that board, or any other cable in OP's system, has to be terminated to T568A. In fact, if he is using pre-terminated patch cables, they are in all likelihood terminated to T568B, and that is just fine.

Since the pin to pin connections are the same for both T568A and T568B (1 to 1, 2 to 2, etc) as long as both ends of a run of cable (be it in-wall, patch cable, whatever) are the same you're good to go.

The fact the the orange pair and the green pair are swapped in T568B (referenced to T568A) makes no difference since the electrons cannot see the color of the wire. rolleyes.gif
Edited by fcwilt - 7/9/13 at 10:28pm
post #40 of 44
Yes, I wonder if the bickering scared the guy away. We were just supposed to get his LAN working.
post #41 of 44
Thread Starter 
It was a bit scarey! smile.gif OK, so no, I still haven't been able to order the continuity checker. I punched everything in the A sequence did not use B anywhere. It was bare wire in the walls, so I had to terminate that as well punch the levitron board. I actually had some separate internet problem that I just had fixed, so, back to this. I found various tools online, some cheap and some expensive. I'm gonna get one that allows me to plug a pre made patch cable into my new plate and another patch cable into the levitron board and then those cables into the continutiy checker. I will try to ensure that those cable work prior to pluggin into the checker. I will report what happens.
post #42 of 44
Lowes and Home Depot have some of the less expensive ones that will do for verifying the wiring. At the least you want one that verifies that there is continuity for all wires AND the wires are connected correctly (pin 1 to pin 1, etc). And generally these tools are two part devices, one at each end, one end is a "remote" and the other end is the part with the controls/readout/display. And yes they usually have jacks and you connect them to the jacks under test with "patch" cords, very short ones often come with the tool.
post #43 of 44
Thread Starter 
got the lan checker from the depot. plugged it in...7&8 were open. ( seated poorly) re punched, and now I am really cooking. thanks for everyone's help.
post #44 of 44
Glad to hear you are up and running.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Home A/V Distribution
AVS › AVS Forum › A/V Control & Automation › Home A/V Distribution › Utilizing "future" cat5e drops in new home for Ethernet and home network