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False Wall Home Theater and What Could Happen

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hello all, I am moving into a new house this coming week and the basement is all mine! smile.gif

The only problem is, the ceiling is not finished, we have concrete floors, and it is a giant square.

My mission, as I chose to accept it, is to create false plywood walls to block off half the basement for a home theater, thus creating a long throw range (rectangle). I know this is no where near ideal, but as I cannot add anything permanent "renting" I am here with my next question. What, if anything, can I do to help ease the issues that will be caused by creating a false plywood wall, and how would you suggest I go about treating it as best as possible? I will be throwing bass traps "floor to ceiling" in the corners eventually, and I will be treating the first points of reflection already, is my situation hopeless?
Edited by slansing - 7/10/13 at 9:41pm
post #2 of 14
Thread Starter 
My guess is nobody has tried this?
post #3 of 14
I don't think what you want is a false wall, but a temporary partition wall. The challenge is going to be keeping it stable without attaching it to the floor and the joists above. Maybe this will give you some ideas.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hmm I wonder how acoustically sound I could make a partition. Great idea though, I think I chose the wrong wording. Any ideas as far as treating the walls so they are as solid as possible? Being actual points of reflection is fine since I will be trapping the room.
post #5 of 14
Why not use floor-to-ceiling theater curtains?

I would think it would be great acoustically without wall boundary reflections to have to treat.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Really? Hmm, I might try to find some thick curtain then. Do you think the curtain would do a good job of isolating the sound in the room? You'd think the waves would easily pass through the curtain. Of course, I don't care how much sound leaks, just a good sounding theater room/area.
post #7 of 14
The false plywood wall is actually a good thing. It will flex with bass and acts as an absorber. And no, the curtain will do nothing to keep the sound inside. It will however act like a mid to high frequency absorber.

So go ahead and partition it off. Then make sure there is good/thick carpeting on the floor. Likely you will need some more absorption on the walls but that topic is much longer smile.gif
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm View Post

The false plywood wall is actually a good thing. It will flex with bass and acts as an absorber. And no, the curtain will do nothing to keep the sound inside. It will however act like a mid to high frequency absorber.

So go ahead and partition it off. Then make sure there is good/thick carpeting on the floor. Likely you will need some more absorption on the walls but that topic is much longer smile.gif

Thanks for the help! I've got the absorption all planned out, just figuring out this wall thing.. So I guess I'll be creating floor standing plywood partitions, then I'll figure out the rest from there. Not sure if AVS has a build section for people to post their builds as they go along but I'll be doing that at Home Theater Shack, and here if I find it. Thanks guys!
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by slansing View Post

Thanks for the help! I've got the absorption all planned out, just figuring out this wall thing.. So I guess I'll be creating floor standing plywood partitions, then I'll figure out the rest from there. Not sure if AVS has a build section for people to post their builds as they go along but I'll be doing that at Home Theater Shack, and here if I find it. Thanks guys!


slansing,


Here is the AVS Forum Dedicated Theater Design & Construction forum where you can chronicle your build! http://www.avsforum.com/f/19/dedicated-theater-design-construction


...Glenn smile.gif
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by slansing View Post

Hello all, I am moving into a new house this coming week and the basement is all mine! smile.gif

The only problem is, the ceiling is not finished, we have concrete floors, and it is a giant square.

My mission, as I chose to accept it, is to create false plywood walls to block off half the basement for a home theater, thus creating a long throw range (rectangle). I know this is no where near ideal, but as I cannot add anything permanent "renting" I am here with my next question. What, if anything, can I do to help ease the issues that will be caused by creating a false plywood wall, and how would you suggest I go about treating it as best as possible? I will be throwing bass traps "floor to ceiling" in the corners eventually, and I will be treating the first points of reflection already, is my situation hopeless?

I think that if you go to the store you will find is that dry wall costs a ton less than plywood, and actually installs more easily and works at least as easily and well as plywood, both visually and acoustically. So, just build the wall(s) the usual way - frame them up on the floor, screw on the dry wall, and then tilt them into place but use shims to hold in place instead of nailing it into place. Truth be known dry wall screws would probably be acceptable for fastening to the joists. As long as you don't go crazy with them, they will come out easily when the day to leave comes. Use two-sided carpet tape to stick the walls into place on the floor. A power screwdriver is a must-buy if you don't have one.

You can probably do something similar for the ceiling. If you have unfinished joists I don't think anybody will go ballistic if you leave a few drywall screw holes behind when you leave. If you build a ceiling that has strips of drywall and strips of high density fiberglass (Example Dow Corning 703) inset into it, you can probably skip the carpeting except for appearance sake. Ditto for the walls.

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/overview/0,,217320,00.html
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Wow awesome Arnyk Thanks a ton for the info and links, I will look into this a bit more, drywall would be ideal. Haha, This Old House, boy does that bring back childhood memories.. And thanks for the link Glenn! I'll start one as I move in!
Edited by slansing - 7/15/13 at 8:44am
post #12 of 14
Why not go for some 1/4" value wood. Chip board, MDF, etc. ? Why spend the time on sheet rock when you can throw up your walls using 2x2s and 1/4" 4x8 sheets. Use weather stripping in between them to seal it off.

Make it with 2x2s and 1/4 inch sheets and it will be light enough to lift into place. If your ceiling is 8ft, for example, build your walls to 7'11". For an 8ft section of wall use three 2x2s with Velcro screwed into the ceiling joists .... one at the beginning of the wall, one in the middle, and one on the other end. Put Velcro on your new false wall top 2x2 frame at the same location, lift into place and walla! Instant wall.

Seal it off at the top with some silicone caulking. Easily scrapeable when it's time for the walls to come down.

You can do all of this with a brad nailer and tiny compressor in less than a 1/2 day.

Sheet rock includes nails or screws, tape and mud. Then more mud. And then yet more mud. IF all you are trying to do is change the reflections points it's my understanding just about anything dense will work to do that.

Of course, there is always more than one way to skin a cat.

But this way you have your easy to remove walls, your rectangle room, and a fatter wallet to go spend some money using the time you saved from staying away from the drywall.
post #13 of 14
It depends on how you build it. If there is enough mass, and you are actually sealing off the rest of the room (ie, a real wall) then it will act as a room boundary and change the characteristics of the room. If it is thin then it might resonate which could absorb some sound as mentioned, but can also buzz, rattle, or add audible resonance which is not so good.

The curtain idea is interesting because the bass will bass right through them (which is good, making the room smaller rarely helps the low end) but it will absorb some highs.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hmm, well I will curtain the corners while I am adding in the walls, if you guys are interested in seeing the room characteristics there are pictures in the thread linked in my signature. Thanks for the tips! smile.gif
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