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How do I build an Arlington Recessed Box with a Power Inlet?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I'm wiring my house for Cat 6 this week and am going to properly deal with coax as well. I need some advice.

Background.

We bought this house two years ago. The coax had been hung on the exterior and that looked terrible (it's a nice modern place, think Dwell magazine). On the network front, we had been using Trendnet Powerline adapters to extend the FiOS signal from my office. Its a big house and WiFi just won't do. Forget watching streaming video without stutter. The Powerline adapters work well enough, but put tons of noise into my speakers. We aren't talking Audiophile tweaker noise, we are talking loud RF interference, like a motor is on in the other room. This got me to thinking about the Cat 6 and I laid out my plans for doing that. Along with that, I figured I'd move the coax inside. Yesterday I successfully pulled the coax line up to where my media center is. It works great. I'm pulling the disconnected coax off the house fast, maybe even today. Cat 6 is next.

The month after we bought the house, I put up a wall mounted TV above the media center and installed a Datacomm straight blade inlet power kit and low voltage pass through. I connect the TV to my APC power conditioner which is necessary around here given the questionable voltage PSE&G delivers us.

http://www.datacommelectronics.com/Recessed-Pro-Power-Kit-with-Straight-Blade-Inlet

Now I'm going to have coax coming out of that wall (for now it comes out of the datacomm, but that's not a great solution) plus Cat 6. I want to make this neater. There are already enough wires coming out of the wall in the Datacomm.

I don't want to put another hole in the wall so I've decided on the Arlington Recessed Box. I like that it mounts to the stud instead of just using wing clips. It seems sturdy and will accommodate my Cat 6 and cable jacks.

http://www.aifittings.com/catalog/communications/recessed-tv-box-for-power-and-low-voltage/TVB613

But what about power? I don't want an outlet there, I want an inlet. If the box had two slots on the left there instead of one two gang slot, I'd be golden. I could just get a recessed inlet plug and a low voltage pass through, But no, that's a two gang slot so I can't have two plates in it can I?

There is this box too,

http://www.aifittings.com/catalog/specialty-boxes/three-and-four-gang-recessed-indoor-inbox/DVFR4W

But once again we get into the problem of how to deal with the inlet plug.

Can I somehow reuse the Datacomm box?
post #2 of 13
Personally, I'd cut another hole, and use 2 boxes. They're hidden behind the TV, AFAIK.

Large variety of TV boxes available, some with multiple single gang boxes, for LV or line voltage.

I didn't check your power extender link, but I'm guessing any standard outlet behind the TV would work with it.

Edit - yes, any standard outlet. You could put in a double outlet, in the AI box, and wire one of the pair to the male extender.
post #3 of 13
Also add power, conventionally, to the other outlet. You may need it in the future.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
I know, that's the sensible thing to do, but I'd like to avoid it. Too many holes in the wall for my taste.

Here's a thought.

I could get this Leviton 80608-W wallplate.

http://www.amazon.com/Leviton-80608-W-Combination-Wallplate-Thermoset/dp/B000U39WQA

and drill a hole for the inlet into the blank section (maybe the screws will be a problem?) and mount this Leviton power inlet into it

http://www.amazon.com/Leviton-5278-C-Receptacle-Industrial-Grounding/dp/B0017SOZ8C

Incidentally, I'm not touching the hole behind the TV. I'm redoing the hole that feeds that hole and is locate behind the media center which is below the TV.
Edited by intermediatic - 7/14/13 at 10:03am
post #5 of 13
No, drilling a hole in and mounting an electrical inlet to a plastic wall plate is not a good idea.
post #6 of 13
I'm confused... If you're going to install a 4-gang recessed TVbox below, you can use the 2-gang Datacom in the double-gang space provided by the TVbox. Then two single-gang plates are still available for keystone plates.

If that's not what you want, you might replace the Datacomm with all or part of one of the decora-sized inlets from Midlite, or their whole recessed PowerJumper parts (perhaps just the inlet half of the kit):

http://www.midlite.com/products.aspx?catId=772


Jeff
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Jautor,

I'd love to re-use the Datacomm, the problem is that it is a recessed unit so I don't think it's going to fit in the 4 gang TVbox. A recessed unit inside a recessed unit seems like a problem. Plus the Datacomm is meant to be put inside of a hole cut in drywall. There seems to be no way to separate the inlet plug from the rest of the unit, but maybe I'm mistaken.

The Decora PowerJumper from Midlite might be the solution I'm looking for.
post #8 of 13
Ok, I didn't see that particular Datacomm part was already a recessed outlet. Now I understand, and yes, the double-gang PowerJumper (the inlet half) would be a good answer, since the TV Box will already have a double-gang box in place.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Unless you have any objections, this one seems less expensive.

Midlite IEC-46W-6RA Power Inlet/Power Cord

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0090UMDGK/
post #10 of 13
I used this Midlite Decora extender, to connect my LAN enclosure to my rack UPS. Ships without the $5 extension cord. The cord in the kit above, linked by intermediatic, has a right angle connector, possibly a problem for a recessed TV box.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002XDQAA6/ref=pd_aw_sbs_e_1?pi=SL500_SS115
Edited by Neurorad - 7/15/13 at 2:41am
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Neurorad, that one is recessed, so again looks like a problem since it'll double the offset into the wall. Unless you used it in that Arlington box and it worked? I'd toss the right angle cable and put in a new cord. Looks to be a standard AC-9 cord.
post #12 of 13
No, I don't think it will double the depth. That male adapter is designed to mount on the front of an enclosed j-box, whether the jbox is recessed or not.

The line voltage section of a TV box is enclosed, and is the same depth as every other j-box.

It's unnecessarily recessed, but it will fit inside of a TV box.

Edit - no, mine is mounted in a standard j-box, and not a TV box.
post #13 of 13
Did you consider this Arlington Box? http://www.amazon.com/Arlington-TVBU505-1-Recessed-Paintable-2-Gang/dp/B003E48COU/ref=pd_sim_hi_3

You can put a standard Decora 6 hole keystone on the right side:
200x400px-LL-0d5a461d_31nJ7fguueL.jpeg

Its much more compact than than the one you posted in your 2nd link.
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