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5.1 Speakers System for Sony ST-DN1040?

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
Hi guys I'm new here, I bought a DVD based HTS 4 years ago I think its time for upgrade. Im a bit of a Sony fan so I want to get the Sony 1040 7.2 receiver .http://www.amazon.com/electronics/dp/B00CAAJDP6

I'm currently looking for a nice 5.1 speaker system. I looked into the Pioneer SP-PK52FS 5.1 Speaker System http://www.pioneerelectronics.com/PUSA/Home/Home-Theater-Systems/Speaker-Packages/SP-PK52FS'

but im not too sure if its going to provide some theater bass thumbing quality. maybe a under kill? or is it perfect?

What do you guys recommended maybe in a whole package budget around $600-$700. I only need a 5.1 for now and upgrade later to a 7.1 with a nice 4k projector as they become cheaper.
I was also thinking to just going to a Sony store and see what they say?

Thanks!
Edited by Arcgav - 7/17/13 at 1:49pm
post #2 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcgav View Post

Hi guys I'm new here, I bought a DVD based HTS 4 years ago I think its time for upgrade. Im a bit of a Sony fan so I want to get the Sony 1040 7.2 receiver .http://www.amazon.com/electronics/dp/B00CAAJDP6

I'm currently looking for a nice 5.1 speaker system. I looked into the Pioneer SP-PK52FS 5.1 Speaker System http://www.pioneerelectronics.com/PUSA/Home/Home-Theater-Systems/Speaker-Packages/SP-PK52FS'

but im not too sure if its going to provide some theater bass thumbing quality. maybe a under kill? or is it perfect?

What do you guys recommended maybe in a whole package budget around $600-$700. I only need a 5.1 for now and upgrade later to a 7.1 with a nice 4k projector as they become cheaper.
I was also thinking to just going to a Sony store and see what they say?

Thanks!

The Pioneer are phenomenally popular budget speakers here.

I am curious about the size of your room, what you listen to and what your total budget so for speakers, sub and receiver?

Also, I do understand that you are a bit of a Sony fan, but a lot of people on this forum prefer other brands of receivers for both value and performance.
post #3 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by bladerunner6 View Post

The Pioneer are phenomenally popular budget speakers here.

I am curious about the size of your room, what you listen to and what your total budget so for speakers, sub and receiver?

Also, I do understand that you are a bit of a Sony fan, but a lot of people on this forum prefer other brands of receivers for both value and performance.

No reason to question the OPs AVR choice. The sony 1040 is competitive with any AVR in its class/price range.

As for speakers, yeh we need room size, expectations, listening preferences etc...

But with a limited budget it would be best to spend about half on the sub if you're into movies. Also might want to just get two speakers and a nice sub for now and then fill in the rest later.
post #4 of 31
Thread Starter 
The current room is 15x10 a living room but i will move out soon with a basement of unknown to get that projector. I want to spend 1200$ - 1400$ For a current 5.1 system with receiver. I mostly want it for movies and tv shows. But mostly for movies.
post #5 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kini62 View Post

No reason to question the OPs AVR choice. The sony 1040 is competitive with any AVR in its class/price range.

As for speakers, yeh we need room size, expectations, listening preferences etc...

But with a limited budget it would be best to spend about half on the sub if you're into movies. Also might want to just get two speakers and a nice sub for now and then fill in the rest later.

For his total budget, he really is spending a lot on the receiver.

He is talking 50% of his budget on a receiver, that is really pretty high by most standards on this forum.

Plus, I think something with Audyssey might well give him better results.

Please, let us avoid a flame war here and focus on his needs.

Please give him your options.

My options would be a Denon with Audyssey, something like this perhaps.

http://www.accessories4less.com/make-a-store/item/DENAVR1913/DENON-AVR-1913-7.1ch-Home-Theater-Receiver-w/AirPlay-3D-ready/1.html

Then spend more money on a better sub.
post #6 of 31
Thread Starter 
Yeah i know im spending more on the receiver but i just want to future proof it.
post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcgav View Post

The current room is 15x10 a living room but i will move out soon with a basement of unknown to get that projector. I want to spend 1200$ - 1400$ For a current 5.1 system with receiver. I mostly want it for movies and tv shows. But mostly for movies.

When you say " basement unknown" does that mean you don't have a space yet or you just don't know its size?
post #8 of 31
Thread Starter 
I don't know the size, but it will be big enough to seat 5 people.
post #9 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcgav View Post

I don't know the size, but it will be big enough to seat 5 people.

What I am asking is: are we talking 10X20, 20X20, 30X20,etc.???

My thought is if you are going to a significantly bigger room, speakers that are less efficient like the Pioneers may not be the best choice.

If you are going to a larger space, maybe you might want to start out with some more efficient speakers so when you move to a larger room that they will be able to fill the space.
post #10 of 31
Thread Starter 
I think i will just get a new set of speakers for the basement and move the pioneers to the living room later. But in your opinion is the pioneer sp-pk52fs and nice combo with the 1040, for a living room 15x10? Im a bit skeptical on the bass.
post #11 of 31
If you just want 5.1 right now, and would upgrade the receiver down the road, the Denon AVR-1713 is a great option. It has Audyssey MultEQ XT room correction which EQs your speakers and subs, and makes a night and day difference. You can get them for ~$300 right now as they are last years models, but still offer all the features you would need.

With $1000 left, that Pioneer system is a good option. You should be able to find the FS52 towers, C22 center, and BS22 bookshelves for ~$400. With the rest of your budget, I would get a nice sub like the Outlaw LFM-1 Plus, SVS PB-1000, HSU VTF-3 MK4, or maybe a pair of Klipsch RW-12D.

This would make for a much more balanced 5.1 system, and I think it would suit you well.
post #12 of 31
Thread Starter 
mmm thats a good idea but I honestly really want the 1040. but, just for 1040 is the pinoneers good? over kill, under kill?
post #13 of 31
All the receivers are very comparable power wise, as long as your receiver is putting out ~75 watts with all channels driven, you will be fine. Getting another 3dB of loudness would require 150 watts of power per channel, which is tough for most high end receivers.

Having Audyssey will make a huge difference in the quality of your sound. You won't be able to tell the difference between the two receivers, you will however after you run Audyssey. And spending less on the receiver lets you get a more capable sub, which will have a big impact on sound quality.

Either of those receivers is fine for the Pioneer speakers, the Denon will let you get the most out of your system with Audyssey, and let you afford more sub.
post #14 of 31
For the OP just an FYI, not everyone likes Audyssey or what it does. It's a take it or leave it mode of correction. You cannot adjust what it does. So if you don't like it you have to turn it off which negates that "feature".

Just saying......
post #15 of 31
Thread Starter 
ok ok whats a comparable denon to the 1040? with 7.2 airplay, blutooth wifi etc.
post #16 of 31
I don't think the Denon's or Marantz have built in bluetooth or wifi. You might be able to buy optional adapters though.
Edited by afrogt - 7/18/13 at 10:13am
post #17 of 31
Thread Starter 
So the martanz paired woth the pioneers good combo?
post #18 of 31
I don't see why it wouldn't be, the Marantz is a very good receiver. As long as it has the features you need. Marantz doesn't have built in bluetooth or wi-fi either.
Edited by afrogt - 7/18/13 at 10:20am
post #19 of 31
Thread Starter 
ok so your saying the sony 1040 and the pinoneers are a good combo, not a over kill on the receiver part?
post #20 of 31
I'm not saying anything about the Sony receiver because I'm not familiar with it. How did you get that assumption?

I own Marantz and Denon receivers, not the exact models that are mentioned here though but am also familiar with Audyssey MultEQ and MultEQ XT. Have no clue about the Sony 1040 or its own room calibration software.
Edited by afrogt - 7/18/13 at 10:43am
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcgav View Post

ok so your saying the sony 1040 and the pinoneers are a good combo, not a over kill on the receiver part?

Last year's Sony 1030 compared favorably to the Denon 1913 in sound and performance at CNET (for what it's worth) It also got good reviews at hometheater.com and sound and vision.com. No real differences with any other AVR in its price range as far as sound.

If you want wifi and BT built in you're kind of limited to Sony or Onkyo. Onkyo uses Audyssey (usually lower level versions)

The Onkyo 727 list for $200 more than the Sony and the 626 lists for $100 less. Check Onlyo's website for differences. Both use Audyssey MultiEQ. Neither have Airplay built in if that's important.

Sony uses its own version of room correction that by all accounts works fine.

But the thing with room "speaker response" correction software is that you won't know if one is better or worse than another in YOUR room without comparing them back to back. Just because one uses multiple mic positions doesn't automatically make it better.

IMO you need to go to an AVR that has Audyssey XT32 with HT sub EQ to gain a noticeable benefit over other non Audyssey room correction. The sub (low frequency) channel is the one that needs the most EQ for most rooms. That's why I'm not changing out my rather old HK AVR until I can afford a Denon X4000.

As for speakers working with a particular brand AVR and not another? Unless they are hard to drive or low impedance then just get the AVR with the features you want at a price you're comfortable with.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcgav View Post

ok so your saying the sony 1040 and the pinoneers are a good combo, not a over kill on the receiver part?

In general, you don't have to worry about pairing receivers with speakers. Most of the home theater AVR's are compatible with the vast majority of speakers out there. It's when you get into specialty receivers (usually meant for specific speaker packages) then compatibility issues may crop up like the speaker and AVR ohm rating.

The other aspect where you might need to be concerned when it comes to the speakers and the AVR you are pairing together, the power handling of the AVR can be important because if the receiver doesn't have enough power to drive your speakers at the desired volume level, you risk clipping the AVR which can damage the speakers. This is why some people on these message boards don't recommend Sony....their Amplifier sections oftentimes don't have enough power for high volume play when using 5+ speakers. Although this can easily be checked by downloading the manual and looking at the total power consumption of the receiver. Divide that amount by the number of speakers you intend to drive and that will give you the max amount of power (in watts) the receiver will be able to commit with all your channels being driven simultaneously.

For example, the Sony DN-1040 you want has a listed power rating of 120w per channel. However, that's for 2-channel (stereo) content. It has a general power rating of 100w per channel and it lists a "Surround" power rating of 165w per channel. However, the total power consumption of the entire unit is only 240 watts. That means at any given time, it can only divide that total power between all channels driven. Thus, if only using a stereo configuration, it can provide 120 watts to each of the channels. In a surround configuration, lets say 5.1, driving 5 channels, it can provide a maximum of 48 watts per channel. Granted, during most surround content, not all of your channels will be driven heavily during the movie. Usually it's just the front and center channels being driven heavily (fronts usually handling music/sountrack and center handling dialogue and centrally located sound effects) and the surrounds are used for ambiance type effects. The surrounds thus, aren't going to require a ton of power to drive during most films. however, there can be times during some films, especially action/sci-fi films where all the channels are being heavily driven. During these moments, your AVR will be overworked and unable to provide all the speakers with the necessary power and it will clip, which is what you want to avoid, otherwise you could damage your speakers tweeters.

This is why a lot of folks around here don't recommend the Sony AVR's. They don't have enough power to drive a lot of speakers to reference level. I found this out from personal experience using a Sony AVR and finding my speakers starved for power when I increased the volume (it could barely handle 40 watts per channel driving 5 speakers) so I went with a Denon AVR that has a total power consumption of 490 watts that gives my setup at home 98 watts per channel to drive my speakers. More than enough for my purposes.
post #23 of 31
Quote:
However, the total power consumption of the entire unit is only 240 watts. That means at any given time, it can only divide that total power between all channels driven. Thus, if only using a stereo configuration, it can provide 120 watts to each of the channels. In a surround configuration, lets say 5.1, driving 5 channels, it can provide a maximum of 48 watts per channel.

And that is assuming all of the total power consumption goes directly to producing sound/watts. There has to be some overhead for other processes and is any power supply 100% efficient? You're probably get less than 48 watts/channel with all channels driven, probably closer to 40.
post #24 of 31
Thread Starter 
cool i didn't know that.. you guys really pushing for Denon AVRs, but the Sony got really good reviews for sound quality and features/price, on top of that I love Sony. I don;t know why soo much love for Denon, I guess i gotta think this over one more time. Also the speaker combos don't matter like for example, my Combo idea: 1040 or a similar Denon paired with the Pioneer sp-pk53fs will be a good 5.1 experience? like out of 10 how much would you guys give it? I really appreciate the help smile.gif
post #25 of 31
If you love Sony then get the 1040. I'm sure you'll be happy with it. Its been getting good reviews.

And you're gonna agonize about it if you buy another brand. Just get the Sony.
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by afrogt View Post

And that is assuming all of the total power consumption goes directly to producing sound/watts. There has to be some overhead for other processes and is any power supply 100% efficient? You're probably get less than 48 watts/channel with all channels driven, probably closer to 40.

Apparently you can't just "guess" by going off the PS. rolleyes.gif

Hometheater measurements of the all but identical 1030

HT Labs Measures
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 118.8 watts
1% distortion at 134.7 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 81.5 watts

1% distortion at 90.4 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 65.4 watts

1% distortion at 78.2 watts

These specs compare favorably with any Denon, Onkyo, Marantz anywhere near the same list price and completely smokes Yamaha AVRs.
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kini62 View Post

Apparently you can't just "guess" by going off the PS. rolleyes.gif

Hometheater measurements of the all but identical 1030

HT Labs Measures
Two channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 118.8 watts
1% distortion at 134.7 watts

Five channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 81.5 watts

1% distortion at 90.4 watts

Seven channels driven continuously into 8-ohm loads:
0.1% distortion at 65.4 watts

1% distortion at 78.2 watts

These specs compare favorably with any Denon, Onkyo, Marantz anywhere near the same list price and completely smokes Yamaha AVRs.

hmmm....thats interesting. I'm wondering how Sony makes their AVR's draw less power yet provide similar results as Denon and Onkyo.
post #28 of 31
Thread Starter 
So Sony 1040 good with the pioneers?
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcgav View Post

So Sony 1040 good with the pioneers?

At this budget, you won't have any audible differences between a Denon/Onkyo/Sony/Yamaha AVR (without EQ), so get the one you like, which is the Sony.
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcgav View Post

Yeah i know im spending more on the receiver but i just want to future proof it.

Of course you should get the AVR you like. Not to be a stick-in-the-mud, but I would feel remiss if I didn't mention that your AVR is typically the piece of the system you will replace most often - specifically because it is the tech most difficult to "future proof".

Consumer home theater AV standards and connections (unfortunately) are ever changing and (maddeningly) are not always backward compatible. Some examples ... two years ago you could barely find an AVR with airplay, on the near horizon you have 4K/UHD and a new HDMI 2.0 standard, a little farther out there's rumor of a new Dolby Atmos "dedicated" chip to allow AVR's to read the upcoming new 32/64 channel audio formats. Honestly, you'd be lucky if your AVR lasts half as long as your speakers (maybe a fourth as long). This is part of the reason most folks in the forum advise spending a smaller percentage of your budget on the AVR.

Best of luck to you smile.gif
Edited by sdg4vfx - 7/20/13 at 1:59am
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