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Homeworx HW-150PVR, Support and Discussion - Page 12

post #331 of 1229
To MediasonicEast:

Request for GPL source code

As the purchaser/owner of a HomeWorx HW-150PVR ATSC Digital TV Converter Box, I am requesting a copy of source code for U-Boot and any other GNU GPL software that are used in this product.

A layman's guide for GPL compliance is at: http://www.softwarefreedom.org/resources/2008/compliance-guide.html

Since U-Boot is released as open source software under the terms of the GNU General Public License,
1) the HW-150PVR should have a declaration that it uses U-Boot and any other GPL software.
2) purchasers of the product are entitled to a copy of the open source software that is used in this product.

Currently Mediasonic is not meeting any of it legal obligations in regards to the GPL software that it sells with its product.

Other manufacturers that use MStar Semiconductor devices & software/firmware comply with open source licensing requirements by having web sites such as LG's: https://www.lg.com/global/support/opensource/opensourceList?superOsCategoryId=CAT00000005&osCategoryId=

Attempts to correspond through Mediasonic Tech Support have yielded no results.

Regards
post #332 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue_z View Post

To MediasonicEast:

Request for GPL source code

As the purchaser/owner of a HomeWorx HW-150PVR ATSC Digital TV Converter Box, I am requesting a copy of source code for U-Boot and any other GNU GPL software that are used in this product.

A layman's guide for GPL compliance is at: http://www.softwarefreedom.org/resources/2008/compliance-guide.html

Since U-Boot is released as open source software under the terms of the GNU General Public License,
1) the HW-150PVR should have a declaration that it uses U-Boot and any other GPL software.
2) purchasers of the product are entitled to a copy of the open source software that is used in this product.

Currently Mediasonic is not meeting any of it legal obligations in regards to the GPL software that it sells with its product.

Other manufacturers that use MStar Semiconductor devices & software/firmware comply with open source licensing requirements by having web sites such as LG's: https://www.lg.com/global/support/opensource/opensourceList?superOsCategoryId=CAT00000005&osCategoryId=

Attempts to correspond through Mediasonic Tech Support have yielded no results.

Regards

U-boot is the boot loader, most hardware manufacturer may not need to modified U-boot, since standard device API, such as Hard disk, USB, WIFI, Ethernet are standard embedded in IC.
U-boot is use to boot up HW150FW, which is to load/layout HW150FW in memory from flash memory and transfer cpu execution there. IF HW1500FW is also open source GNU license, HW150FW may have to compliance to GNU, otherwise may no need to. It is very hard to enforce, unless it is big name OEM vender such as IBM, HP, Oracle, Microsoft, Some law firms in New York may search and work on it for big profit.

I have no internal knowledge of HW150. No sure U-boot has updated or not.
Edited by png5 - 9/28/13 at 1:21pm
post #333 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by png5 View Post

No sure U-boot has updated or not.
U-Boot has to be configured for each board design, and often has to be customized for new SoCs.
That the U-Boot used in this product has been modified from mainline version 1.1.6 is obvious to me and probably anyone familiar with U-Boot by looking at the 'help' menu in post #330.

But that is irrelevant, as compliance is not contingent on whether the code has been modified, as you incorrectly imply.
A product that incorporates GPL code is subject to the GPL.
It's that simple.
The source code is free to use, but is not free of obligations.
The few exceptions, such as an application linked with a GPL library, obviously do not apply to U-Boot.
There is no "otherwise may no [sic] need to" exemption from the GPL for Mediasonic.

Quote:
It is very hard to enforce...
Apparently the majority of non-compliance cases are due to ignorance of requirements of using GPL code.

Instead of contributing to the misunderstandings, why don't you try to encourage organizations to comply with their legal obligation?

Regards
Edited by blue_z - 9/30/13 at 11:59am
post #334 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue_z View Post

You're confusing computer hardware terminology with layman's terms.

All digital processors have clocks.
The main clock is the timing signal of a fixed frequency for the processor. The original IBM PC used a processor clock of 4.5 MHz. The typical modern PC uses a processor clock of 1 to 2 GHz. The MStar 7816 SoC in these units has a 552 MHz clock.
(There are asynchronous logic devices, but they are rare.)

Modern processors have interval timers.
These timers are hardware registers driven by a clock source, count (down) clock cycles and generate interrupt events, e.g. a periodic interval timer aka PIT.
There are typically (longer/slower) software interval timers that are derived from these (shorter/faster) hardware interval timers.
The MStar 7816 obviously has an interval timer that operates in low-power mode that can wake-up the processor from sleep mode to perform a scheduled recording.

Maintaining the time-of-day (aka wall clock time) while the processor is fully powered up is rarely an issue, although systems perform this with varying degrees of accuracy.
The problem is acquiring/maintaining the time-of-day when the unit powers up or awakens from sleep.
The common solution for computers to obtain the time-of-day is to use a RealTime Clock (aka RTC), which is often a low-power device that can be battery powered for continuous operation.
But if the unit (such as an ATSC tuner) already has access to time-of-day sources, such as (compliant) ATSC signals, then the unit could dispense with an RTC.
Solutions involving AC line frequency or radio signals are impractical, incomplete and/or simply not cost effective.

As I previously posted the MStar 7816 SoC used in theses STBs may already have an integrated (but unused and unusable) RTC, according to the boot log.

Regards
I'm not confused. I was using the term "clock" in the "layman's" sense: something that tracks the time of day. I wasn't referring in any way to the high-frequency oscillator that "clocks" a CPU. I apologize for being unclear; perhaps I should have used the term "real-time clock" (or the acronym RTC) to avoid confusion with the CPU's clock.

My point was simply that if the Homeworx can accurately time a recording, then the same mechanism (probably a built-in interval timer as you suggested) could be used to track time-of-day as well. A hardware RTC (real-time clock) wouldn't be necessary; the interval timer could simply interrupt the CPU every minute, and the CPU could update a time-of-day stored in NVRAM.

I'm well aware that this would require some way to set the time-of-day, both at initial power-up and whenever it drifts too far from the true time. Note that I said:
Quote:
Firmware could allow the time-of-day and day-of-week to be either set manually, or synced to a user-specified station with accurate PSIP time when in standby.

An important point is that, if even one station with accurate PSIP is available, the interval-timer "kludge" RTC would only be needed when the Homeworx was tuned to a different station (whether recording or just watching). So it wouldn't need to be super-accurate unless PSIP were completely unavailable (as in the cable environment), and I'm sure cable users would be happy for anything that allowed timed recordings to work at all.

Now: the above was only meant to point out that a somewhat accurate time-of-day could be implemented in firmware after all, and may not be as difficult as it originally seemed. But I've also urged the OEM to implement a truly accurate RTC, if/when they design a new model. To maintain long-term accuracy, a simple crystal oscillator is inadequate: it will inevitably drift. And while the Homeworx is marketed only to OTA users, the hardware-identical iView is marketed to cable users as well, so PSIP can't be relied on; the RTC needs something else to synchronize to. Luckily, in North America there are several possible alternatives:
  1. SNTP to an Internet time source
  2. The 60-Hz sine wave from the AC power line
  3. WWVB, a LF radio station in Ft. Collins, CO receivable at night across North America

I didn't suggest the first option because that would require adding Internet connectivity to the box, and I was concerned that would raise the price too much. But if that's the cheapest option, the manufacturer can and should by all means go for it!

But I'm baffled by your statement:
Quote:
Solutions involving AC line frequency or radio signals are impractical, incomplete and/or simply not cost effective.

Huh? Every AC wall clock or clock radio you've ever owned, whether analog or digital, uses option 2, unless it's a so-called "atomic" clock that uses option 3 instead; and most of them cost much less than even the inexpensive Homeworx.

Option 2 is particularly cheap to implement and surprisingly accurate. All it takes is a capacitor on the AC input and a chip that can count pulses. It's the same 1980's technology included in the earliest VCRs. Yes, you have to reset the clock after a power outage, which is why the flashing 12:00 became such a joke before time signals were common. But that's still far better than a recorder that just doesn't work at all without PSIP.

And yes, over a short period, a crystal oscillator is more accurate. But power companies constantly adjust the 60-Hz signal, so short-term inaccuracies don't accumulate as with a crystal oscillator.
post #335 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue_z View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by png5 View Post

No sure U-boot has updated or not.
U-Boot has to be configured for each board design, and often has to be customized for new SoCs.
That the U-Boot used in this product has been modified from mainline version 1.1.6 is obvious to me and probably anyone familiar with U-Boot by looking at the 'help' menu in post #330.

But that is irrelevant, as compliance is not contingent on whether the code has been modified, as you incorrectly imply.
A product that incorporates GPL code is subject to the GPL.
It's that simple.
The source code is free to use, but is not free of obligations.

Regards

That is all true if Mediasonic licensed U-Boot under the GPL (e.g., used it for free). But Mediasonic could have negotiated different license terms with U-Boot's developers. For example, they could have paid the developers for a proprietary, non-GPL version. Developers who license software under the GPL aren't prohibited from licensing the same software under different terms as well. The license is a restriction on the software user, not the developer.

But here's hoping that Mediasonic took the cheap & easy route and just grabbed the open-source, GPL version. If that's the case, they are indeed obliged to release the source code. biggrin.gif

You might contact U-Boot's developers and see if they made a deal with Mediasonic. If not, we're in luck.
post #336 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHBrandt View Post

My point was simply that if the Homeworx can accurately time a recording, then the same mechanism (probably a built-in interval timer as you suggested) could be used to track time-of-day as well. A hardware RTC (real-time clock) wouldn't be necessary; the interval timer could simply interrupt the CPU every minute, and the CPU could update a time-of-day stored in NVRAM.
There's no reason to use "if". The MStar 7816 SoC has hardware timers. The system could maintain date & time using a PIT, programmable interval timer.
Even the original IBM PC could do that. Until you installed a clock/calendar board, MS-DOS always asked for the date and time on every bootup.

The purpose of an RTC is typically to maintain the calendar and clock time while the system is powered off.
Many systems, including Linux, only retrieve the RTC's calendar and clock time values on system startup. Once the system has booted, the system date & time are maintained by software using a PIT, programmable interval timer, which can vary in accuracy.
The system may have the capability to periodically "adjust" the system date & time, such as Linux using NTP, the Network Time Protocol. Updating the RTC (sometimes referred to as the hwclock) with the adjusted date & time is optional.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHBrandt View Post

... the RTC needs something else to synchronize to. Luckily, in North America there are several possible alternatives:
  1. SNTP to an Internet time source
  2. The 60-Hz sine wave from the AC power line
  3. WWVB, a LF radio station in Ft. Collins, CO receivable at night across North America
.
You have a list of apples and an orange.
A computer needs a source that can provide the calendar date and clock time for proper RTC synchronization.
The AC power line cannot provide this information.
Putting a radio receiver in a metal enclosure will probably require an external antenna. Reception could still be problematic.
A network interface should not be a half-baked implementation; it should provide network file sharing capabilities. This would probably require an upgrade to a full OS such as Linux for the protocol stack.

Regards
post #337 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHBrandt View Post

That is all true if Mediasonic licensed U-Boot under the GPL (e.g., used it for free). But Mediasonic could have negotiated different license terms with U-Boot's developers. For example, they could have paid the developers for a proprietary, non-GPL version. Developers who license software under the GPL aren't prohibited from licensing the same software under different terms as well. The license is a restriction on the software user, not the developer.

But here's hoping that Mediasonic took the cheap & easy route and just grabbed the open-source, GPL version. If that's the case, they are indeed obliged to release the source code. biggrin.gif

You might contact U-Boot's developers and see if they made a deal with Mediasonic. If not, we're in luck.
The honcho of U-Boot developers made no mention of alternate licensing when made aware of a possible GPL violation by MStar products in Poland earlier this year.
The U-Boot web site has a page devoted to "licensing" and it makes no mention of alternate licensing.

I suspect that Mediasonic is not fully aware of its obligations.
Section 7.2 of A Practical Guide to GPL Compliance seems to describe the likely situation that Mediasonic is in:

7.2 Upstream Providers

With ever-increasing frequency, software development (particularly for embedded devices) is outsourced to third parties. If you (e.g. Mediasonic) rely on an upstream provider (e.g. the MStar SDK for the 7816) for your software, note that you cannot ignore your GPL compliance requirements simply because someone else (e.g. MStar) packaged the software that you distribute. If you redistribute GPL’d software (which you do, whenever you ship a device with your upstream’s software in it), you are bound by the terms of the GPL. No distribution (including redistribution) is permissible absent adherence to the license terms.


Regards
Edited by blue_z - 10/3/13 at 6:25pm
post #338 of 1229
I just ordered this unit yesterday after a friend showed his to me. VERY EXCITED!!! Quite a few times I've wished I could record OTA tv and I'm excited to be able to.

I have one question...

Does anyone know of any USB connected drive that can ALSO be shared over the WIFI via SAMBA/Windows share? I have two WD TV LIVE media players which can see shared folders over the network and play files from them. If I could find such a device I could watch my recorded videos from one of the WDTV devices in another room! That would be KILLER!!! I found some USB Thumb drives with a WiFi sharing feature but that feature is disabled when plugged into a USB port. I want it to STAY enabled wink.gif Not to write to it over the network JUST READ/Play files from it biggrin.gif:)
post #339 of 1229
How would the USB drive connect to your WiFi network? The Homeworx has no networking capabilities. The TViX 6620 allows you to play files stored on its HDD via SMB, although the performance isn't the best if the DVR is decoding something when you're trying to stream.
post #340 of 1229
Sounds as he is expecting a lot out of a $40 device.
Go wired, forget wireless, no dropouts, no security issues, cheaper. There is always a way to get a cable from point A to point B. wink.gif
Edited by videobruce - 10/5/13 at 5:52am
post #341 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by petermg View Post

I just ordered this unit yesterday after a friend showed his to me. VERY EXCITED!!! Quite a few times I've wished I could record OTA tv and I'm excited to be able to. I have one question... Does anyone know of any USB connected drive that can ALSO be shared over the WIFI via SAMBA/Windows share? I have two WD TV LIVE media players which can see shared folders over the network and play files from them. If I could find such a device I could watch my recorded videos from one of the WDTV devices in another room! That would be KILLER!!! I found some USB Thumb drives with a WiFi sharing feature but that feature is disabled when plugged into a USB port. I want it to STAY enabled wink.gif Not to write to it over the network JUST READ/Play files from it :D:)

The WiFi drive may see the Homeworx differently from a computer but I doubt it . You could just turn the power off on he Homeworx when streaming from the flash drive .
post #342 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by petermg View Post

I just ordered this unit yesterday after a friend showed his to me. VERY EXCITED!!! Quite a few times I've wished I could record OTA tv and I'm excited to be able to.

I have one question...

Does anyone know of any USB connected drive that can ALSO be shared over the WIFI via SAMBA/Windows share? I have two WD TV LIVE media players which can see shared folders over the network and play files from them. If I could find such a device I could watch my recorded videos from one of the WDTV devices in another room! That would be KILLER!!! I found some USB Thumb drives with a WiFi sharing feature but that feature is disabled when plugged into a USB port. I want it to STAY enabled wink.gif Not to write to it over the network JUST READ/Play files from it biggrin.gif:)


I would expect any wifi enabled drive to disable wireless when connected via USB due to the inherit security risks that would exist otherwise. While this wouldn't matter when connected to a device like the Homeworx, the drives are made to be connected to computers via USB so they are designed with that in mind. I'm not saying it's not possible a drive like you want exists but just that I wouldn't expect it since that is how these drives are designed.

Like wallydog said though, it may be enough to power off the Homeworx to make it work. Of course, if you are trying to record at the same time or someone else is watching TV through the Homeworx, that's not going to work. I would read reviews on any drives you want to consider because when I was looking briefly at them a bit ago, I read that at least one very popular one had a bug that required it to be rebooted between disconnecting from a USB and turning on WiFi hotspot.

Also, with the thumb drives you mentioned, they will need to be very high speed to handle recording on the Homeworx. Most flash drives do not function well as recording devices but some have had success with very high speed devices. They are definitely not ideal for this purpose, so if you did not also have some other use for them, I would only buy them if you will have no problem returning them.
post #343 of 1229
Thanks everyone for your responses and suggestions. I have spent much of the day today and some yesterday looking online and locally for such a drive, either wired or wireless and have yet to find one at any price. The friend of mine who showed me this device bought a 64GB usb stick / thumb drive and he was recording directly to that so I wonder which one he got since you guys say the drive has to have a fast transfer rate... how fast though? Also when he showed it to me I did notice that most if not all of his recordings were NOT HD, they were of an SD channel. However I did ask him to do a test recording of an HD broadcast, 1080i, and it looked great, but it was only a 40 second test recording. I'm wicked excited about getting this thing on Monday!!!! biggrin.gif
post #344 of 1229
You need at least 20 Mbps write speed to record 1080i channels at full bandwidth.
post #345 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post

You need at least 20 Mbps write speed to record 1080i channels at full bandwidth.

Thanks for the quick response. Would it benefit me to get a USB drive that is USB 3.0 or is this device just 2.0 compliant??
post #346 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by petermg View Post

Thanks for the quick response. Would it benefit me to get a USB drive that is USB 3.0 or is this device just 2.0 compliant??

Yes to both your questions. The Homeworx is only USB 2.0 but it will benefit you to use a 3.0 drive. Assuming it is capable of faster than usb 2.0 speeds, then it will, being backwards compatible, function at the fastest speed that the usb 2.0 port can handle.
post #347 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by jprc View Post

Yes to both your questions. The Homeworx is only USB 2.0 but it will benefit you to use a 3.0 drive. Assuming it is capable of faster than usb 2.0 speeds, then it will, being backwards compatible, function at the fastest speed that the usb 2.0 port can handle.

Ok then I think I will just give up on my hope and dream of some kind of simultaneous USB and network drive and just get a 64GB USB thumb drive, one that can handle at least the required transfer rates for the recording and that should be just under 8 hours of 1080i recording at that space. Plus since I already have a media server on my home network I can always just copy off the recorded files to my main media server and watch them that way to free up space on my thumb drive biggrin.gif Guess that's what I'll end up doing!!! again, VERY EXCITED to get this on Monday!!!!! But now I'll have to find a local USB 64GB fast drive at a decent price... redface.gif
post #348 of 1229
Assuming the USB 3.0 drive costs more, it isn't worth it. USB 2.0 already supports speeds an order of magnitude faster than are necessary for recording ASTC 1080i at the maximum bitrate. If you want to be sure that the speed will be sufficient, get a class 4+ SDHC or SDXC card with a USB adapter, as SD cards have a well defined speed rating system, unlike flash drives. As long as the USB adapter doesn't require any special software, the Homeworx should theoretically see the SD card as a standard USB storage device, assuming it is formatted with FAT32, rather than exFAT.
post #349 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post

Assuming the USB 3.0 drive costs more, it isn't worth it. USB 2.0 already supports speeds an order of magnitude faster than are necessary for recording ASTC 1080i at the maximum bitrate. If you want to be sure that the speed will be sufficient, get a class 4+ SDHC or SDXC card with a USB adapter, as SD cards have a well defined speed rating system, unlike flash drives. As long as the USB adapter doesn't require any special software, the Homeworx should theoretically see the SD card as a standard USB storage device, assuming it is formatted with FAT32, rather than exFAT.

Thanks I just might do that. HOWEVER, I found someone on CL selling their used ones of these:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236189
for only $45. I'll see if I can't pick it up from them tomorrow biggrin.gif
post #350 of 1229

Hello, I just got the HW-150PVR and am having some issues.

It has v8 software.

 

1) It would be nice if "Format" asked for confirmation.    I accidentally formatted a drive that I didn't want to reformat. 

2) I clicked EPG and tried to schedule recording in the future on a channel besides what I was watching.   

After configuring, I turned off my TV.

This recording didn't seem to work.

My external HD drive seemed to be off when I checked on it hours later.

 

3) I tried EPG again but this time I changed to watch the channel first, scheduled the recording, and then turned off the TV.

The recording seems to work.

 

However, when I connect the external drive to my computer, the windows explorer doesn't see any files on the drive though it knows 14GB of used space.

The drive is formatted in NTFS.

 

Thanks for any suggestions.

Sorry if the answers are in this thread already. It is difficult to pick through hundreds of postings.  ;)

post #351 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by petermg View Post

Thanks I just might do that. HOWEVER, I found someone on CL selling their used ones of these:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236189
for only $45. I'll see if I can't pick it up from them tomorrow biggrin.gif

Get some more reference on USB memory(SD and Flash drive) around below URL for IV3500, it does apply to HW150.
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1465875/iview-3500stb-tuner-dvr-owners-thread/1680
post #352 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsuser View Post

Hello, I just got the HW-150PVR and am having some issues.
It has v8 software.

1) It would be nice if "Format" asked for confirmation.    I accidentally formatted a drive that I didn't want to reformat. 
2) I clicked EPG and tried to schedule recording in the future on a channel besides what I was watching.   
After configuring, I turned off my TV.
This recording didn't seem to work.
My external HD drive seemed to be off when I checked on it hours later.

3) I tried EPG again but this time I changed to watch the channel first, scheduled the recording, and then turned off the TV.
The recording seems to work.

However, when I connect the external drive to my computer, the windows explorer doesn't see any files on the drive though it knows 14GB of used space.
The drive is formatted in NTFS.

Thanks for any suggestions.
Sorry if the answers are in this thread already. It is difficult to pick through hundreds of postings.  wink.gif

Does the channel you were on in #2 have the correct clock time? This is the main source of missed recordings, although not the only one. Did you leave the homeworx on or off before the recording time? Does the channel you were recording seem to re-tune in the channel multiple times when you first switch to it after not being on that channel for awhile?

Not sure why your computer is not seeing the file. What operating system? Does the file play properly on the homeworx?
Edited by jprc - 10/6/13 at 4:29pm
post #353 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by jprc View Post


Does the channel you were on in #2 have the correct clock time? This is the main source of missed recordings, although not the only one. Did you leave the homeworx on or off before the recording time? Does the channel you were recording seem to re-tune in the channel multiple times when you first switch to it after not being on that channel for awhile?

Not sure why your computer is not seeing the file. What operating system? Does the file play properly on the homeworx?

 

Thanks for the reply.  I did not have daylight savings time on, so the time was likely off by an hour.  However, it should still have recorded something.  Yes, I left everything on.

I sometimes see the retuning when exiting the PVR menu.

 

I'm using windows 7 home premium.  

The file I successfully recorded in step 3 was playable.  However, I then disconnected my drive from the Homeworx box and connected to my computer and browsed around using Explorer and Disk Manager (to look for the .mts file). I guess my computer didn't see anything because it's written on some hidden partition?   Well, I reconnected the drive back to the Homeworx and when browsing in PVR mode, the recording and directory it resided in had disappeared!  All I saw was some $RECYCLE_BIN directory.. which presumably was generated on Windows.

It is rather inconvenient if I have to have a dedicated drive just for PVR and cannot connect it to a computer.

post #354 of 1229
At this point, which is the superior firmware, that of the HW, or the iview? I don't care about QAM capability, more stability and functions that work.
post #355 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawne Kleckner View Post

At this point, which is the superior firmware, that of the HW, or the iview? I don't care about QAM capability, more stability and functions that work.

I'd say they are about the same now. I have an iview box and have run both iview and homeworx firmware. I'd call it a tie right now.
post #356 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsuser View Post

Thanks for the reply.  I did not have daylight savings time on, so the time was likely off by an hour.  However, it should still have recorded something.  Yes, I left everything on.
I sometimes see the retuning when exiting the PVR menu.

I'm using windows 7 home premium.  
The file I successfully recorded in step 3 was playable.  However, I then disconnected my drive from the Homeworx box and connected to my computer and browsed around using Explorer and Disk Manager (to look for the .mts file). I guess my computer didn't see anything because it's written on some hidden partition?   Well, I reconnected the drive back to the Homeworx and when browsing in PVR mode, the recording and directory it resided in had disappeared!  All I saw was some $RECYCLE_BIN directory.. which presumably was generated on Windows.
It is rather inconvenient if I have to have a dedicated drive just for PVR and cannot connect it to a computer.

The second issue you are facing is not the norm. I would try re-formatting the drive again but from your computer this time, also NTFS, and see if the problem continues. You may also want to do an error check scan of your drive while it's connected to the computer to make sure there are not bad sectors/clusters/etc.

Now the recording issue. I'm not sure from your reply if you actually checked the time on that channel. It sounds like you are just guessing it was an hour off because of the DST setting. Check the time specifically on the channel that you left it on when it was waiting to record but did not. Also, if the channel you are recording is one that the Homeworx tunes in multiple times when you first switch to it, this is a known issue that it will only record if you leave it on the channel. It seems related to receiving PSIP info. We were just discussing this on the iview thread as well. I'm not sure if that is your problem either. You should test that channel when you know it does not have recent PSIP info by switching to it and see if it tunes in, then goes blank, then tunes in again, etc.
post #357 of 1229
Ok so I got mine today biggrin.gif So far seems to work well but I just tested recording manually. I haven't scheduled anything yet. The channels come in good and when I set the RF to loop, my TV's built-in tuner is able to get TV channels, even when the PVR is off! Not by the switch but by the remote, which maybe would be considered standby? I actually have not tried it by having the switch off, but by powering it off via the remote, my TV still gets reception!! biggrin.gif For some reason I saw something on here that the PVR had to be ON for this...

I did end up getting that WD 1TB drive off CL for $45, works great thus far.. Says I have over 200 hours of video I can record HAHAH. One thing I want to say about everyone recommending AGAINST using a USB Flash drive, the datarate limit for ATSC HDTV from what I've read is about 2.42 MEGABYTES a second. I did read and write testing on some flash drives I had laying around and they were all at least double this so I don't think using a USB Flash drive would be an issue. But for the price of a 64GB flash drive, my used CL special 1TB drive works just great for $45 biggrin.gif

I have noticed something else, I CAN CHANGE CHANNELS while still recording a different channel... but and I don't know the technical term for this but it can only be a sub-channel. For instance, if I'm recording 8-1, I can tune to 8-2 and 8.3 and watch either of those three channels while my PVR is still just recording 8-1!!! I didn't see any mention of that on this thread, although I only read half of these posts.

One FINAL thing.. I think I have a newer firmware than listed in this thread, looks like it's V13! Unless I'm reading something wrong??? Here's a pic!

post #358 of 1229
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I did read and write testing on some flash drives I had laying around and they were all at least double this so I don't think using a USB Flash drive would be an issue.
On paper is one thing, but there have been enough people that tried and failed.
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But for the price of a 64GB flash drive
Which is the point.
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I CAN CHANGE CHANNELS while still recording a different channel... but and I don't know the technical term for this but it can only be a sub-channel.
Depending on the FW, it is/was possible to change channels while recording, but doing so would pause the recording until you returned to that channel.

And yes, you read the version number correctly.
post #359 of 1229
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Originally Posted by videobruce View Post

Depending on the FW, it is/was possible to change channels while recording, but doing so would pause the recording until you returned to that channel.

And yes, you read the version number correctly.

When I change the channel, it still is recording the original channel, without pausing as I reviewed my recording. But again it only allows me to change the sub-channel, as I explained before, it gives me a message about stopping the recording if I say, try to go from 8-1 to 10-1 but doesn't flinch if I'm recording 8-1 and go to 8-2 or 8-3, I can not only view all three of those, but the recording does not stop for the one it started on.

However I am getting a strange issue. I tried to set it up to record Castle automatically on weekly, then Jimmy Kimmel automatically weekly. It let me set Castle just fine but when I went to set Jimmy Kimmel, which is from 11:35pm to 12:35am, it said that it was conflicting with the first recording scheduled. BUT, if I FIRST set Jimmy Kimmel, THEN add Castle, it works just fine?! So for some reason it's getting confused because there was no conflict in the first place. Anyone else experience this?
post #360 of 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by petermg View Post

When I change the channel, it still is recording the original channel, without pausing as I reviewed my recording. But again it only allows me to change the sub-channel, as I explained before, it gives me a message about stopping the recording if I say, try to go from 8-1 to 10-1 but doesn't flinch if I'm recording 8-1 and go to 8-2 or 8-3, I can not only view all three of those, but the recording does not stop for the one it started on.

However I am getting a strange issue. I tried to set it up to record Castle automatically on weekly, then Jimmy Kimmel automatically weekly. It let me set Castle just fine but when I went to set Jimmy Kimmel, which is from 11:35pm to 12:35am, it said that it was conflicting with the first recording scheduled. BUT, if I FIRST set Jimmy Kimmel, THEN add Castle, it works just fine?! So for some reason it's getting confused because there was no conflict in the first place. Anyone else experience this?

The first part of your post is known. The second is also known. It is part of the "midnight bug" that happens when you schedule recordings spanning the midnight hour.

As far as your previous comment about flash drives, since you just got this box today, you would do well to assume that the many people who have had problems recording to average speed flash drives may actually know more than you about this issue. You can read any theoretical thing you want about speeds, but when person after person says they cannot get good recordings to flash drives unless they are high speed, your theory doesn't matter. We were trying to help you not waste money and be able to use your new Homeworx as soon as possible. If you already knew everything about how this box functions and interacts with other technology, you wouldn't be here asking questions.
Edited by jprc - 10/7/13 at 9:19pm
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