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Plasma Calibration f8500

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I bought this screen and I want to make this process

http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/news/plasma-screen-burn-2007032738.htm

1. "Display a pure white image "
if i don't have Digital Video Essentials
what " pure white image" i can put ?
post #2 of 18
Greetings

You should just follow the recommendations of the article and just watch normally ... and act responsibly by not putting damaging things on the screen. Unless of course you are incapable of doing something like that.

The screen antiburn pattern substitutes for full frame patterns anyway ... and it is a high contrast sweep.

regards
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thank you
But unfortunately I did not understand your reply

"You should just follow the recommendations of the article"
What does that mean? I did not understand

"and just watch normally "
what is normally ?
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV View Post

Greetings

You should just follow the recommendations of the article and just watch normally ... and act responsibly by not putting damaging things on the screen. Unless of course you are incapable of doing something like that.

The screen antiburn pattern substitutes for full frame patterns anyway ... and it is a high contrast sweep.

regards

do you think the risk of IR/burn-in (especially perceived risk by the average consumer) is one of the main reasons companies like Panasonic are phasing out their plasma lineup?

or is there more to why Panasonic won't be making plasmas next year?
Edited by PlasmaPZ80U - 7/25/13 at 7:25am
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6311 View Post

Thank you
But unfortunately I did not understand your reply

"You should just follow the recommendations of the article"
What does that mean? I did not understand

"and just watch normally "
what is normally ?

the recommendations from that article are:

1. Adjust the brightness and contrast correctly on your plasma TV. If you don’t have calibration material just set them to slightly below half of the maximum possible.

2. Display a pure white image covering the whole of the plasma screen. Reference Materials, Title 14 (System Evaluation), Chapter 6 (100% Flat Field) in Digital Video Essentials works well, just make sure you don’t display the pause button too.

3. Gradually increase the hours during the power-on/ power-off cycles (i.e. do this for 2 hours then switch the TV off for one hour; then 4 hours on, 2 hours off; then 5 hours on, 2 hours off; and so on and so forth). This way the phosphors can stabilise properly, and you can catch any potential problem before it becomes worse.

4. 50 to 100 hours of power-on running-in will age the phosphors sufficiently to minimise the risk of plasma screen burn.

The reason this method works is because you are burning the phosphors EVENLY by displaying the same intensity across the whole plasma screen. It is actually taught and endorsed by the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF), you can read about it in this AVSForum thread here.




but he is also saying you don't need to do anything special to view your plasma like break-in slides, just don't leave static elements on-screen for too long or extended use of black bars (left and right or top and bottom)
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
I asked a simple question
How to perform the said journal


Adjust the brightness and contrast correctly on your plasma TV. If you don’t have calibration material just set them to slightly below half of the maximum possible.

Display a pure white image covering the whole of the plasma screen. Reference Materials, Title 14 (System Evaluation), Chapter 6 (100% Flat Field) in Digital Video Essentials works well, just make sure you don’t display the pause button too.

Gradually increase the hours during the power-on/ power-off cycles (i.e. do this for 2 hours then switch the TV off for one hour; then 4 hours on, 2 hours off; then 5 hours on, 2 hours off; and so on and so forth). This way the phosphors can stabilise properly, and you can catch any potential problem before it becomes worse.

50 to 100 hours of power-on running-in will age the phosphors sufficiently to minimise the risk of plasma screen burn.

The reason this method works is because you are burning the phosphors EVENLY by displaying the same intensity across the whole plasma screen. It is actually taught and endorsed by the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF), you can read about it in this AVSForum thread here.
post #7 of 18
the answer to your question in post #1 is if you don't have a test pattern disc with a 100% white full field pattern (all-white bright full-screen pattern) you can use the screen anti-burn pattern built into the Samsung's menu
post #8 of 18
Greetings

Normally means exactly as the article states. Avoid static patterns ... which means little 4:3 material and widescreen material with bars on top and bottom.

Just use it normally and in a responsible manner.

Just because you get past the first 200 hours doesn't mean the TV is now impervious to any burn in damage ... it isn't. If you keep watching the same channel every day ... over and over and over ...Say ESPN ... their logo will burn into the TV just like the scoreboard information at the bottom of the screen.

(As for the future of plasma ... they may not be putting any more money into development, but there may still be a 2014 unit ... with just cosmetic changes. More money to be made in other technologies ...)



Regards
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post



or is there more to why Panasonic won't be making plasmas next year?

Not putting any more $$$ into research and development and not making them anymore are 2 different things. They will continue to make and sell plasmas, but do not expect any better performance that the VT60/ZT60 going forward.

Michael is dead on. Use the TV responsibly. For the first 60 days do not leave static images on the screen for more than 20-30 minutes. Stretch 4:3 content to avoid black bars, and use "wide fit" or "zoom" to avoid tickers on news stations or ESPN. Turn on the pixel orbiter if the set offers it, and for heaven's sake get it out of torch mode!

I use a plasma daily as my desktop computer monitor and have never had any burn in issues. I also use full screen when surfing the web to avoid address bars and such (F11 for Chrome users). Every once in a while I will activate the scrolling white sweep (built into the set) and let it run for 10-15 minutes.
Edited by jdoostil - 7/26/13 at 11:32am
post #10 of 18
I thought some posts in an earlier thread confirmed Panasonic would not make a 2014 plasma model lineup at all (don't remember which thread it was, but I recall Buzzard and others posting something about it).
post #11 of 18
Ok so im receiving my F8500 next week and it will be my first plasma screen. What settings would you guys recommend for the first 100-200 hours? I understand that i can watch normal content while being careful but do i need to run any specific Material as soon as i turn on the TV like a Calibration Disc (and if so any recommendatons?). Once the 100-200 hours are up then im good for a Pro Calibration correct? Also Michael when is the next time you will be available in the Montreal area?

Thx guys
post #12 of 18
Greetings

Chris, I expect to be back in late October/early November time frame (Oct 24-Nov 8). I'm teaching a class in Toronto (about 3 days) around that time and will have time to go to Ottawa and Montreal as well.

Just use the Movie mode and vary the material. That really is about it. No specific material or calibration disc unless you want to use one first. The Movie mode settings are pretty close out of the box.

The 100-200 hr thing has nothing to do with calibration, but rather early mortality issues. A new plasma will hold the calibration just as well as one that is 6 months old or 12 months old. There is no massive drift.

I had a client about a month back that had an F8500 and I worked on it brand new. Bad luck for him, TV developed some green line type defect and he had to return it. His second F8500 was a problem as well. I just did his ZT60 that he settled with ... again brand new.

Drop me an email and I will put you on my contact list for the Fall. Michael@TLVEXP.com

Regards
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV View Post

Greetings


The 100-200 hr thing has nothing to do with calibration, but rather early mortality issues. A new plasma will hold the calibration just as well as one that is 6 months old or 12 months old. There is no massive drift.

I had a client about a month back that had an F8500 and I worked on it brand new. Bad luck for him, TV developed some green line type defect and he had to return it. His second F8500 was a problem as well. I just did his ZT60 that he settled with ... again brand new.

Drop me an email and I will put you on my contact list for the Fall. Michael@TLVEXP.com

Regards

Im abit confused as I was under the impression that if you calibrated out of the box then you would need to calibrate again very shortly after. I dropped you and email and a PM.

Regards
post #14 of 18
Greetings

That's not the case. I've worked on many, many sets literally brand new out of the box ... then returned 4 to 6 months later to find little to no change. Then returned 6 months further down the line to find the same. Where was this massive change that was supposed to happen when the tv was new? Didn't see it ... and it falls into the category of urban myth.

Projector bulbs are another thing. (Yup they need around 50 hours to settle down)

regards
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV View Post

Greetings

That's not the case. I've worked on many, many sets literally brand new out of the box ... then returned 4 to 6 months later to find little to no change. Then returned 6 months further down the line to find the same. Where was this massive change that was supposed to happen when the tv was new? Didn't see it ... and it falls into the category of urban myth.

Projector bulbs are another thing. (Yup they need around 50 hours to settle down)

regards

OK thx for clearing that up. Also you see no benefits in running slides for the first 100 hours in order to age the panel evenly?
post #16 of 18
Greetings

If you want to run slides ... then go ahead if it makes you feel better. There is no science that says you are achieving something that normal use would not achieve.

I'd just enjoy the TV over the same period rather than waste the TV's life and the associated energy for what?

But don't believe the people that engineer the TVs ... they don't know what they are doing at all. smile.gif

Regards
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV View Post

Greetings

If you want to run slides ... then go ahead if it makes you feel better. There is no science that says you are achieving something that normal use would not achieve.

I'd just enjoy the TV over the same period rather than waste the TV's life and the associated energy for what?

But don't believe the people that engineer the TVs ... they don't know what they are doing at all. smile.gif

Regards

I'd much rather be watching content and enjoying the tv to be honest smile.gif thx for the solid info. will send you an email for the calibration & look forward to seeing you soon!
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

I thought some posts in an earlier thread confirmed Panasonic would not make a 2014 plasma model lineup at all (don't remember which thread it was, but I recall Buzzard and others posting something about it).

There is lots of speculation over at HDJ but no real reason to think Panasonic will stop making PDF. R&D may be reduced. How much better can you make a VT60?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael TLV View Post

Greetings

If you want to run slides ... then go ahead if it makes you feel better. There is no science that says you are achieving something that normal use would not achieve.

I'd just enjoy the TV over the same period rather than waste the TV's life and the associated energy for what?

But don't believe the people that engineer the TVs ... they don't know what they are doing at all. smile.gif

Regards

Absolutely. If break in slides are some sort of requirement it would be in the owners manuals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Rimos View Post

I'd much rather be watching content and enjoying the tv to be honest smile.gif thx for the solid info. will send you an email for the calibration & look forward to seeing you soon!

There you go. I'd rather be watching Breaking Bad than slides. wink.gif
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