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Chromecast: Google in the Living Room, Take Two - Page 2

post #31 of 476
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildgoose View Post

I wonder how good the video quality is and whether it supports subtitle on netflix....

It's 1080p video, with 5.1 sound. How good is it compared to Roku, PS3, AppleTV, Blu-ray players and myriad other devices? That remains to be seen.
post #32 of 476
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruhnie View Post

Possibly really dumb question, but will this work directly plugged into an A/V receiver? Otherwise what's the point if you can't pump the audio through your system?

The answer is yes. I found a quote in an article from The Verge -
Quote:
"and can be plugged right into an A/V receiver if your TV doesn't have an extra port"
post #33 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lazarus Dark View Post

However, who in the heck doesn't have their photos in the cloud these days? It will show anything from the Chrome browser, so just go to your G+ photos or Tumbler or wherever you keep your pics.

I shoot exclusively in raw, so unless I go through and process every photo, the cloud is out for me. The sizes are currently too big for the cloud. Even a pedestrian family reunion will net me around 16gigs in a weekend. I exceed the 1 terabyte file limit too. I know, I have a problem. ^_^;

Besides that, I'm more interested in my movie collection on my computer, which is DEFINITELY not cloud friendly. ^_^;
post #34 of 476
The fact that it needs to be plugged in to a USB port for power? or charging really defeats the small stature. I'd hate to have to dig behind my AVR or TV every day to pull it out and charge it.

The Roku stick is a much better streaming device and for Apple households the Apple TV is still better in most ways.
post #35 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kini62 View Post

I'd hate to have to dig behind my AVR or TV every day to pull it out and charge it.
What? Why wouldn't you just leave it plugged in and never touch it again?
post #36 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kini62 View Post

The fact that it needs to be plugged in to a USB port for power? or charging really defeats the small stature. I'd hate to have to dig behind my AVR or TV every day to pull it out and charge it.

The Roku stick is a much better streaming device and for Apple households the Apple TV is still better in most ways.

You don't have to do that. It uses the USB port to power it and it comes with the charger that the usb plug plugs into. You just need the extra outlet behind your TV.
post #37 of 476
This seems like an excellent tool for traveling.

Before I found out about this today I was looking at new phones. My upgrade is soon.
I was thinking of connecting my old phone into my TV. My phone has HDMI out, so I am thinking of doing that and getting a sixaxis.
post #38 of 476
Ordered...for $35, I am simply curious to see what it will do.
post #39 of 476
Ordered. For $35 bucks plus Netflix its a steal. I might actually buy one of these too now:

http://buy.thegameklip.com/products/gameklip-galaxy-siii
post #40 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddog007 View Post

This seems like an excellent tool for traveling.

Before I found out about this today I was looking at new phones. My upgrade is soon.
I was thinking of connecting my old phone into my TV. My phone has HDMI out, so I am thinking of doing that and getting a sixaxis.

This is why I ordered one. Looks like a nice little easy to carry device to plug into hotel TV's.
post #41 of 476
$35.00 Google USB spy dongle , now google can monetize it further selling TV watching data !biggrin.gif
All kidding aside for the price and 3 months of Netflix to get started for those thinking of subscribing it's like an $11.00 deal so it's all good.
I don't have the need for it at the moment my TV's , PS3 and PC's are all DNLA networked so I'm good.
post #42 of 476
So its basically the same as I can already do with with my Iphone5 Netflix/Youtube to my samsung smart tv?

I ordered one anyways, for 35$ and 3 months netflix why not. Ordered first, thought about it later. The only benefit of this I can see is if my wife can watch her web based TV show episodes that play in flash.
post #43 of 476
Curious how open the hardware is... Hardware specific XBMC-android port anyone
post #44 of 476
The ads are dishonest to not show the power cabling. It doesn't have a battery as specified.
post #45 of 476
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjvnyc View Post

The ads are dishonest to not show the power cabling. It doesn't have a battery as specified.
I never saw such a spec.
post #46 of 476
I know it's only $35 bucks...but it seems so limited. A raspberry pi + XBMC is more capable more for the same $35. And I'm not sure that we need ANOTHER wireless video streaming standard on top of all the ones we already have. If it could handle local file playback though, I'd be intrigued.
post #47 of 476
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

I know it's only $35 bucks...but it seems so limited. A raspberry pi + XBMC is more capable more for the same $35. And I'm not sure that we need ANOTHER wireless video streaming standard on top of all the ones we already have. If it could handle local file playback though, I'd be intrigued.

Any Chrome tab straight to your screen! That one feature—perfected—is a really big deal. It's in beta now, but the way it is implemented it should make it so that any service that delivers content through a browser will work with the Chromecast. In my view, that's the "killer app" that opens TV up to the web, once and for all. There is not another wireless streaming standard at work here AFAIK, just a copy of Chrome and a little chip to run it, that works on any HDMI-equipped TV.

At least that's what I hope. Mine shipped already, so I'll know very soon.
Edited by imagic - 7/25/13 at 4:38am
post #48 of 476
post #49 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

Any Chrome tab straight to your screen! That one feature—perfected—is a really big deal. It's in beta now, but the way it is implemented it should make it so that any service that delivers content through a browser will work with the Chromecast. In my view, that's the "killer app" that opens TV up to the web, once and for all. There is not another wireless streaming standard at work here AFAIK, just a copy of Chrome and a little chip to run it, that works on any HDMI-equipped TV.

At least that's what I hope. Mine shipped already, so I'll know very soon.

Is it any tab though? Or just the video?

It shouldn't be too difficult for someone to create a local video player in .html that you can run through chrome on a laptop...but everything still depends on what codecs the device supports. I still get the feeling it's not going to work nearly as well as the commercial shows.

More than anything I'm just worried that the success of this device would slow down the adoption of a universal standard. At the very least, as long as apple doesn't block it's implementation in something like VLC for iOS, it could be really useful to me.
post #50 of 476
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjvnyc View Post



more honest, i.e. less Google

h/t: http://venturebeat.com/2013/07/24/chromecast-first-look/

I'm trying pretty hard to find a marketing photo of any TV, Blu-ray player, STB, Phone, computer... you name it... that is pictured with a cord/cable coming out of it. Par for the course.
post #51 of 476
There must be a cursor (click "start"/"stop" on the YT video), and that will certainly come from the phone or PC- you won't be able to use the TV remote as the cursor, as the only interactions from the TV towards the HDMI source are, I believe, to establish the DRM identity. For planned viewing, not spur of the moment "look what's on my phone" it would be embarassing for the graphics card industry if the $35 Chromecast's picture quality approached an HDMI cable from your PC' to the TV (said cable costs $15 by the way). To me, this is a cool toy, to be actively controlled by a phone or tablet in a highly social context ("look at the photos I just took on my phone"), but irrelevant otherwise.
Edited by cjvnyc - 7/25/13 at 5:12am
post #52 of 476
Hmmmmm...... I expect this to be a game changer. Maybe not so much for us power users and early adopters that have been streaming content for years over a myriad of devices/interfaces, but as people continue to be frustrated by $100+ /month cable, and for only $35 begin to cut the cord, I think this is a big deal. I imagine Time Warner/Dish/Comcast/Verizon/DirectTV etc.... Are not very happy about this at all.

If I could stream NFL Sunday Ticket, over any reliable source, I'd cut the cord. Hoping Google partners with NfL.
post #53 of 476
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjvnyc View Post

There must be a cursor (click "start"/"stop" on the YT video), and that will certainly come from the phone or PC- you won't be able to use the TV remote as the cursor, as the only interactions from the TV towards the HDMI source are, I believe, to establish the DRM identity. For planned viewing, not spur of the moment "look what's on my phone" it would be embarassing for the graphics card industry if the $35 Chromecast's picture quality approached an HDMI cable from your PC' to the TV (said cable costs $15 by the way). To me, this is a cool toy, to be actively controlled by a phone or tablet in a highly social context ("look at the photos I just took on my phone"), but irrelevant otherwise.

1080p video with 5.1 audio is what it provides, I think it will look just about identical to a PC running YouTube, Netflix and Google Play. Start/stop comes from the controlling device, with phones/tablets it's been designed so play/pause doesn't require a screen unlock. TV volume control also comes from the device's volume control.
post #54 of 476
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

Is it any tab though? Or just the video?

It shouldn't be too difficult for someone to create a local video player in .html that you can run through chrome on a laptop...but everything still depends on what codecs the device supports. I still get the feeling it's not going to work nearly as well as the commercial shows.

More than anything I'm just worried that the success of this device would slow down the adoption of a universal standard. At the very least, as long as apple doesn't block it's implementation in something like VLC for iOS, it could be really useful to me.

As far as I gather, you get the whole Chrome tab. I already have UPS tracking info and am chomping at the bit to get real answers. But the thing to remember, Chromecast operates independently from the device that is controlling it. Chromecast replicates the page that you send to it from a desktop/laptop, but it is not connected to it. That's why you can turn the control device off, while content still plays on the TV.

Using local copy of Chrome to play a local file and display it on a TV is not going to work.
Edited by imagic - 7/25/13 at 5:46am
post #55 of 476
The one problem I see with this and Netflix is that Netflix has a lot of HD content running only in SD through a pc browser (Amazon does the same thing). So a movie you can watch in HD on an app through a OTT box or Smart TV will only be in SD. Will you be able to watch content that is blocked on Google TV (such as network websites and Hulu)? Nobody mentioned this, I guess I'll hear from you guys that have already ordered one. If it can, then I'll buy one real quick. I can watch all of this stuff on one hdtv because it's connected to my htpc. But to be able to do the same thing on my other set without having to connect another pc (right now I have to hook up my laptop to it), that's a winner. But for $35 AND three free months of Netflix, it's hard to go wrong with this device.
post #56 of 476
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhufnagel View Post

The one problem I see with this and Netflix is that Netflix has a lot of HD content running only in SD through a pc browser (Amazon does the same thing). So a movie you can watch in HD on an app through a OTT box or Smart TV will only be in SD. Will you be able to watch content that is blocked on Google TV (such as network websites and Hulu)? Nobody mentioned this, I guess I'll hear from you guys that have already ordered one. If it can, then I'll buy one real quick. I can watch all of this stuff on one hdtv because it's connected to my htpc. But to be able to do the same thing on my other set without having to connect another pc (right now I have to hook up my laptop to it), that's a winner. But for $35 AND three free months of Netflix, it's hard to go wrong with this device.

These items actually have been addressed. Netflix runs in an optimized app on Chromecast, and is fully 1080p-capable. You will get the STB HD stream, not the PC browser stream. As for Hulu, that can be watched through a Chrome tab, but the quality is not "optimized," I don't know exactly what that means for PQ yet, I'll write a review as soon as possible after I get mine.
post #57 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

I know it's only $35 bucks...but it seems so limited. A raspberry pi + XBMC is more capable more for the same $35. And I'm not sure that we need ANOTHER wireless video streaming standard on top of all the ones we already have. If it could handle local file playback though, I'd be intrigued.
Consider this case. I'm planning to get one of these for a net cost of $11 after the Netflix promo in order to stream Netflix to a hotel TV when travelling. Would you rather bring something the size of a key fob, plug it in and start watching, or bring an exposed circuit board the size of your hand, its wifi dongle, an HDMI cable, your XBMC server computer, and possibly your own router, fire all that up and still not even be able to watch Netflix? I think I'll take the $11 key fob myself.

Also consider that if your TV is more than a couple of years old, it's not a smart TV and can't stream Netflix. There are millions of those out there. You could technically travel with a Roku or streaming blu-ray player, but those won't fit in your pocket or your laptop bag.

I already have a pi, HTPC, streaming blu-ray players, XBMC server, WMC server and extenders, the whole nine yards, so have no use for this device in my home. But none of that stuff is very portable. This thing is perfect for the road and ridiculously cheap. I'm in.
post #58 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

As far as I gather, you get the whole Chrome tab. I already have UPS tracking info and am chomping at the bit to get real answers. But the thing to remember, Chromecast operates independently from the device that is controlling it. Chromecast replicates the page that you send to it from a desktop/laptop, but it is not connected to it. That's why you can turn the control device off, while content still plays on the TV.

Using local copy of Chrome to play a local file and display it on a TV is not going to work.

Maybe not directly, but it should work via a web server on your local network, similar to a router. Naturally, you'd have to leave the device hosting the web server on...but that could also allow for transcoding to any format that chromecast doesn't support.
post #59 of 476
If it streams Netflix in HD it doesn't need any other features to be worth $35. This makes sense.

I still don't get how it is independent- how are you going to tell the device to stop/start the video? You have to interact with it, and you only have a TV remote and a smartphone in your hands. So I presume there will be an app for the phone, and if Chromecast is to be a fully functioning Chrome tab, one open to many forms of webpages that open in Chrome, then presumably this app will be, effectively, a tab of Chrome. So, back in the circle, the device must function as-if a stream of Chrome, albeit not a proper client.

How long until Google wants to monitor what you do on your TV, even when you've selected another source input, and asks this of the display manufacturers? A TV "cookie" if you will.
Edited by cjvnyc - 7/25/13 at 6:16am
post #60 of 476
Come to think of it, why Netflix don't sell Netflix Stick. I'd buy a handful in a heartbeat. What can I say, My favourite colour is red tongue.gif
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