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Google Fiber - what are you using it for? - Page 2

post #31 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by StardogChampion View Post

This is exactly why we'll never have FiOS in our neighborhood. All our utilities are underground. Everyone with above-ground utilities just outside the neighborhood can get FiOS but everyone inside Comcast is our only choice.

In Boston, Verizon wanted to get fiber into downtown high-rises, but the mayor-for-life balked at their plan to cherry-pick coverage with fine granularity. He told them they couldn't rip up residential streets and without providing service to the people living there. Verizon scrapped their plans entirely.
post #32 of 73
Thread Starter 
So the local storage box they give you can play MKV, MTS / bluray in full HD audio!


You copy your MKV / MTS files to the local storage device. Then the TV that is plugged into to the fiber (google tv) will pick it up and render it (both the HD video and HD Audio), like a built in roku. Can also do Netflix in Super HD with 5.1. Also does Vudu but I haven't tried that.
post #33 of 73
I don't have Google fiber, but I do have 50Mb/s fiber. You can setup your own neoRouter network, and your neighbors can all enjoy streaming your media directly to their systems. If you had HDHomeRuns (CC or OTA), you can map them to neighbors' WMC setups and they can watch live TV from your home.


By the way, how much does the 1Gb/s Google Fiber service cost? I can get 1Gb/s service from my provider, but that costs $299 here.
post #34 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puwaha View Post

I don't have Google fiber, but I do have 50Mb/s fiber. You can setup your own neoRouter network, and your neighbors can all enjoy streaming your media directly to their systems. If you had HDHomeRuns (CC or OTA), you can map them to neighbors' WMC setups and they can watch live TV from your home.


By the way, how much does the 1Gb/s Google Fiber service cost? I can get 1Gb/s service from my provider, but that costs $299 here.
You do realize what you stated is illegal, and would not take any time for someone to slip to your ISP, or they notice that you have a large amount of packet traffic, then start snooping and sniff to see why. Then you no longer have service to be able to share out to the neighbors. Of course it would not stop you in setting up a private LAN and then you have to worry about getting a Cease & Desist notice to stop sharing licensed content.
post #35 of 73
Plus, who the hell likes all their neighbors that much?
post #36 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post

You do realize what you stated is illegal, and would not take any time for someone to slip to your ISP, or they notice that you have a large amount of packet traffic, then start snooping and sniff to see why. Then you no longer have service to be able to share out to the neighbors. Of course it would not stop you in setting up a private LAN and then you have to worry about getting a Cease & Desist notice to stop sharing licensed content.

Gray area. How is it any different than me making a recording and sharing that recording with a friend? Loaning out a CD, DVD, etc? Netflix knows that people share their accounts among friends... so does Amazon.

It's a rhetorical question, and I don't want to go down some legal road sideshow. I'm just stating what you "could" do... theoretically. wink.gif
post #37 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by staknhalo View Post

Plus, who the hell likes all their neighbors that much?

Touche! But, neighbors share wifi and split costs all the time. It's not like you are hurting for bandwidth in a Google Fiber scenario.
post #38 of 73
Thread Starter 
The google fiber is $70. The Google fiber TV is $50 more
post #39 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by ymarker View Post

The google fiber is $70. The Google fiber TV is $50 more

That is a heck of a deal. I know Google doesn't mind losing money on a venture, but how in the world do they ever plan on making any sort of return on this? What do you have to sign away to get it? Are they allowed to spy on your internet traffic to send you better ads?
post #40 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricN View Post

In Boston, Verizon wanted to get fiber into downtown high-rises, but the mayor-for-life balked at their plan to cherry-pick coverage with fine granularity. He told them they couldn't rip up residential streets and without providing service to the people living there. Verizon scrapped their plans entirely.

What Verizon does (and I assume all the other companies do it too) is look at what the percentage of people who default on their bills is in an area and then when it hits too high of a number they stop providing new services to that area. It is smart. Why spend a few hundred dollars a home to install fiber when the owner will never pay a single bill?
post #41 of 73
Thread Starter 
Well to get free nexus 7 (functions as a remote controller) and get the construction fee waived ($300), I think you sign up for 2 years.
post #42 of 73
Thread Starter 
So apparently google fiber provides native IPv6. Anyone using IPv6?
post #43 of 73
I work indirectly for Google Fiber in KC,KS right now. I actually work for Par Electric and am on the pole change out crews. I can answer most of the infrastructure questions past the curb.
post #44 of 73
Does Google Fiber service neighborhoods with underground utilities?
post #45 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puwaha View Post

That is a heck of a deal. I know Google doesn't mind losing money on a venture, but how in the world do they ever plan on making any sort of return on this?

If all of the equipment is already 1gbps capable then the marginal cost to provide 1gbps service versus 50mbps is practically zero. The vast majority of internet users don't come anywhere near maximum bandwidth usage and even for the heavy ones the wholesale bandwidth costs have plummeted over the years. Nowadays a terabyte of internet traffic costs an ISP less than $10 and on average bandwidth prices drop about 50% each year.

It sounds like your ISP has 50mbps as the lowest tier, I'd be willing to bet that 95% of their customers only have the 50mbps tier. If that is the case, it means your ISP is averaging less revenue per customer at $50/month than google fiber does at $70/month (ignoring google's "free" tier).

PS, is your ISP EPB? The prices you quoted seem to line up.
post #46 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerryW View Post

If all of the equipment is already 1gbps capable then the marginal cost to provide 1gbps service versus 50mbps is practically zero. The vast majority of internet users don't come anywhere near maximum bandwidth usage and even for the heavy ones the wholesale bandwidth costs have plummeted over the years. Nowadays a terabyte of internet traffic costs an ISP less than $10 and on average bandwidth prices drop about 50% each year.

It sounds like your ISP has 50mbps as the lowest tier, I'd be willing to bet that 95% of their customers only have the 50mbps tier. If that is the case, it means your ISP is averaging less revenue per customer at $50/month than google fiber does at $70/month (ignoring google's "free" tier).

PS, is your ISP EPB? The prices you quoted seem to line up.

Good points. Yes, I am on EPB. Their lowest tier was 30Mb/s last year, and made the 50Mb/s the lowest tier as they were facing massive ad campaigns from Comcast and AT&T (U-Verse) claiming better speeds, which was of course absolute lies. But apparently that is completely legal as long as you don't mention the other company by name.
post #47 of 73
Thread Starter 
Just tried bitcasa. Great concept with their infinity drive. The speeds are rather dismal however. Max like 200mbps but only works for files < 1gb using the windows 8 metro app or direct upload. Using their desktop sync app takes painfully long at 10-20mbps
post #48 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puwaha View Post

Good points. Yes, I am on EPB. Their lowest tier was 30Mb/s last year, and made the 50Mb/s the lowest tier as they were facing massive ad campaigns from Comcast and AT&T (U-Verse) claiming better speeds, which was of course absolute lies. But apparently that is completely legal as long as you don't mention the other company by name.

They are certainly taking notice. Google is going to be the new 800lb gorilla in the US ISP market.

The tipping point I am looking for is when cities start to tear up the franchise agreements they have with the pair mentioned,
driven by the desperate need for money in many cities resulting from the last recession.

Once this happens there will be quite a shake up.

Google has the financial and legal muscle to back this and make it happen.

Google (Mkt cap 293B) is bigger than ATT (Mkt Cap 177B) and Comcast (Mkt Cap 112B) put together at moment.

http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=GOOG
http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=CMCSA
http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=T
post #49 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puwaha View Post

Good points. Yes, I am on EPB. Their lowest tier was 30Mb/s last year, and made the 50Mb/s the lowest tier as they were facing massive ad campaigns from Comcast and AT&T (U-Verse) claiming better speeds, which was of course absolute lies. But apparently that is completely legal as long as you don't mention the other company by name.

EPB Just changed their price structure to two tiers:

100/100 for $58/month
1Gb/1Gb for $70/month

http://stopthecap.com/2013/09/17/epb-celebrates-4th-anniversary-with-free-speed-upgrades-and-price-cuts-69-99-for-1gbps-service/
post #50 of 73
Holy cow!

So for only $12 more a month, I get 20 times the bandwidth! I just checked and I'm still only getting 50, so I haven't been upgraded yet. This is great news!
post #51 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-- View Post

Does Google Fiber service neighborhoods with underground utilities?

if there were spare conduits installed (99% likely) then yes.
post #52 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puwaha View Post

Holy cow!

So for only $12 more a month, I get 20 times the bandwidth! I just checked and I'm still only getting 50, so I haven't been upgraded yet. This is great news!

Unless 100 or more people live in your household, 1 Gbit connection won't do anything for you. It is very unlikely that you could utilize over 50 Mbit. Everything you connect to will receive and return at a rate far less bandwidth.
post #53 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterfram View Post

Unless 100 or more people live in your household, 1 Gbit connection won't do anything for you. It is very unlikely that you could utilize over 50 Mbit. Everything you connect to will receive and return at a rate far less bandwidth.

Ohrly?

http://www.giganews.com/why.html
Quote:
Every Giganews account features unlimited download speed. Whether you have a 10Mbps or 1000Mbps connection, our Usenet servers will max out your connection. Unlimited speed means unlimited speed.

Not saying that falls under "typical" usage, but you certainly don't need 100 people in the house to benefit from 1Gbit Internet. I would venture a guess that my Remote Desktop experience to/from work would be much better as well.
post #54 of 73
Even if you can use 1000Mbps for a short time, does it really give you much of an advantage over 100Mpbs? Sure, you wait slightly less, but at such speeds its not like you are even going to use it 24/7 because everything just finishes so fast, in fact, its probably going to use less then 1% of its potential monthly bandwidth.

There is only so many movies to pirate every month, at some point all you're left with to download is more and more porn. smile.gif

Not that i would object to a 1000Mbps connection, but its not like it would really change the amount of data i download in a month, or how i use the net, because my 50Mbps connection right now is mostly idle as it is.
Its nice to get stuff fast when you need it, but i would argue that at 100Mbps the speed to get stuff "fast enough" has already been reached... for now! (stuff will most likely get bigger in the future, 4K movies, etc)

PS:
On my 50/10 line, remote desktop seems to be working pretty OK as it is, not sure how much influence more bandwidth would have on this, its probably more of a latency thing.
Edited by Nevcairiel - 9/18/13 at 11:16pm
post #55 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nevcairiel View Post

Even if you can use 1000Mbps for a short time, does it really give you much of an advantage over 100Mpbs? Sure, you wait slightly less, but at such speeds its not like you are even going to use it 24/7 because everything just finishes so fast, in fact, its probably going to use less then 1% of its potential monthly bandwidth.

There is only so many movies to pirate every month, at some point all you're left with to download is more and more porn. smile.gif

Not that i would object to a 1000Mbps connection, but its not like it would really change the amount of data i download in a month, or how i use the net, because my 50Mbps connection right now is mostly idle as it is.
Its nice to get stuff fast when you need it, but i would argue that at 100Mbps the speed to get stuff "fast enough" has already been reached... for now! (stuff will most likely get bigger in the future, 4K movies, etc)

PS:
On my 50/10 line, remote desktop seems to be working pretty OK as it is, not sure how much influence more bandwidth would have on this, its probably more of a latency thing.
Oh, I completely agree. I've only got 20Mbit at home and it's plenty fast for downloading anything I want. Any traffic that could potentially choke my connection I keep throttled anyway (in order to keep surfing as responsive as possible) and I've never been significantly behind in my download queue. I'm actually certain I wouldn't download any more in any given month. But what I did download would show up a lot quicker.

But the assertion that there isn't anything that can be downloaded at 1Gbit is flat wrong. It was wrong when people said it about 100Mbit connections. I was wrong when they said it about 10Mbit connections. It was wrong when they said it about 1.5Mbit DSL, 512k DSL, and 56k modems. There has pretty much always been content available on the interwebs that can saturate a consumer internet connection, regardless of what speed it is.
post #56 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nevcairiel View Post

Even if you can use 1000Mbps for a short time, does it really give you much of an advantage over 100Mpbs? Sure, you wait slightly less, but at such speeds its not like you are even going to use it 24/7 because everything just finishes so fast, in fact, its probably going to use less then 1% of its potential monthly bandwidth.

You are are thinking about the bandwidth in terms of what services are like now. Remember back when everyone had dial-up? The services adapt and sometimes drive bandwidth requirements.

Now, as to what you would do with 1GB/s speed? Setup mesh networks, share data instantly. Complete and total on-demand/dvr. I could share my HD HomeRun Prime tuners with neighbors, quickly backup my systems "off-site" to a neighbor. The neighborhood becomes the "cloud".
post #57 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puwaha View Post

Gray area. How is it any different than me making a recording and sharing that recording with a friend? Loaning out a CD, DVD, etc? Netflix knows that people share their accounts among friends... so does Amazon.

It's a rhetorical question, and I don't want to go down some legal road sideshow. I'm just stating what you "could" do... theoretically. wink.gif

There are legitimate uses for using your netflix account away from your house. Example - you visit your parents and watch something on their network with your account.
post #58 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nevcairiel View Post

Even if you can use 1000Mbps for a short time, does it really give you much of an advantage over 100Mpbs? Sure, you wait slightly less, but at such speeds its not like you are even going to use it 24/7 because everything just finishes so fast, in fact, its probably going to use less then 1% of its potential monthly bandwidth.

There is only so many movies to pirate every month, at some point all you're left with to download is more and more porn. smile.gif

Not that i would object to a 1000Mbps connection, but its not like it would really change the amount of data i download in a month, or how i use the net, because my 50Mbps connection right now is mostly idle as it is.
Its nice to get stuff fast when you need it, but i would argue that at 100Mbps the speed to get stuff "fast enough" has already been reached... for now! (stuff will most likely get bigger in the future, 4K movies, etc)

PS:
On my 50/10 line, remote desktop seems to be working pretty OK as it is, not sure how much influence more bandwidth would have on this, its probably more of a latency thing.

Who downloads porn anymore? That's why god invented youporn. I don't store anything anymore, if you want to watch a movie from your past just stream it from amazon.
post #59 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffkro View Post

I don't store anything anymore, if you want to watch a movie from your past just stream it from amazon.

Assuming it hasn't gone down the memory hole. There is a difference between purchasing a copy and purchasing access to a copy.

New York Times - Amazon Erases Orwell Books From Kindle
post #60 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffkro View Post

Who downloads porn anymore? That's why god invented youporn. I don't store anything anymore, if you want to watch a movie from your past just stream it from amazon.

I don't download much, but I store every Bluray I have ever purchased. Which is a ton
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