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Tiny HD Encodes - How do you encode your Blu-Ray Rips?

Poll Results: How do you encode your rips?

 
  • 48% (15)
    Leave Raw
  • 6% (2)
    1-2GB
  • 0% (0)
    2-3GB
  • 0% (0)
    3-4GB
  • 6% (2)
    4-6GB
  • 9% (3)
    8-10GB
  • 29% (9)
    Other (leave comment)
31 Total Votes  
post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
Well, after I built my HTPC, I wanted to sell my BDP-CX960 and rip all of my disks, which is about 400. So, I started ripping my DVD's, and using Handbrake to compress them to about 800MB-1GB files. They look great, have 5.1 audio, and are pretty small. But when it came to Blu-Ray's, I was kinda at a loss. I don't really want to have to have 8-10GB rips, I wanted something more like 2GB for 1080p. Now, most of you will probably find that atrocious, but I have finally gotten it right. If you look at sites like YIFY torrents, they do just that. So, I set off to be able to match the quality of their encodes.

I will attach a zip with Handbrake plists, and you can import my settings right into Handbrake.

Since it's copyrighted, I will not upload any samples from movies, but I will link to a trailer for Iron Man 3 encoded with the settings.
720p: http://www.mediafire.com/?ybeh5gpacbe67w8 (I personally only use these for my iPad, as I don't think that it is worth watching on a TV)

1080p: Soon



NOTE: To encode like this takes time. With an i7, it takes about 10 hours to encode a 2 1/2 hour movie, but in the end, I consider that well worth it. If you want to make the encodes go a bit faster, you can turn off 2 pass encoding, but it will degrade quality. If you choose to go 720p, it will take a little bit less time.

Okay, now lets talk about how the quality is. As far as quality goes, click here for a 1080p sample, and here for a 720p sample. It is quite acceptable quality for 1080p. I watch these encodes on a 60 or 65" (I can't remember biggrin.gif) TV from about 10 feet away. They look great. They also include 5.1 audio. The problem with most of the small HD encodes you find floating around the internet is that they have horrible audio quality. The quality with these settings is great.

So, what do you think of my settings?



Tiny HD Handbrake Presets 3k .zip file

(I'll have the 1080p trailer uploaded soon!)
Edited by macman13 - 8/5/13 at 5:51pm
post #2 of 31
Personally I only remux, never reencode. I didn't invest in Blu-ray to compromise quality.
post #3 of 31
rarely touch them. some comedies or things I record off of encore or mgm I take to 720p.
post #4 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsoccer33 View Post

rarely touch them. some comedies or things I record off of encore or mgm I take to 720p.

Okay. May I ask how you remove the DRM from encore? I always want to do that!
post #5 of 31
I rip out everything but the highest quality original language audio track, and only keep the main film. I don't care about extras, and I'm never going to want a compressed version of the same audio track. If it's a 3D disc, I only rip the 2D version.
The one exception I make is that I will store both the English and original language audio tracks for animated content.

This can save quite a lot of space from ripping the entire disc to an image, but retains the original quality. I will never spend the time to rip my discs again at some point in the future, so I might as well get it right now, and pay more for storage than sacrifice quality.
Why even buy Blu-ray discs if you don't want the quality? Just sign up to Netflix.
post #6 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by macman13 View Post

Okay. May I ask how you remove the DRM from encore? I always want to do that!

i don't subscribe to any cable now but the only channel in my package that was copy once was retroplex. encore was copy freely
post #7 of 31
Raw baby... Hit that RAW!

1080p uncompressed MKV's 15-35GB's each usually.

Why da fuq would you do anything different ??? I'd rather light my reproductive organ on fire and put it out with a sledge hammer than re-encode all my stuff to save some disc space (and lose some picture and sound quality eek.gif )

Think about this:

$99 gets you a 3TB HDD. $150 gets you a 4TB HDD. So that is like about $35 per TB on average ($30-$40 is normal)

So if 3000GB (3TB) is $100 how much does it cost you per each full size MKV in storage cost ???

25GB is about average MKV rip I'd guess. So that is 4 rips per 100GB, 40 per TB. That means you can get 120 movies on a $100 drive. So that is $0.83 cents per movie.

You can pay $20 for the movie but not another .083 cents to store it digitally in full quality and not have to get up and change discs ? Or enjoy the browsing functionality with coverart ?

The cost of storage is too cheap to consider anything but full quality IMO


*note

I have a 4770k i7 Haswell in my desktop at 4.6ghz. I have a 2600k i7 in my other PC. I have a 3570k in my HTPC. I have triple monitors on my workstation- and I can Remote desktop into the other machines from the 4770k and put one on each screen. I could encode three movies at the same time, on three locally running versions of handbrake - and I have my server too wink.gif

My reason is not really because it takes a long time to encode videos- because I think for me it probably takes a lot less than almost anyone else around here.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1473771/my-desktop-just-raped-all-my-files/0_100


I think the major issue is the quality for me. But for a normal person with a less PC than me- I could only imagine the pain in encoding an entire library. Then at the end after all that work you have lower quality picture and sound copies... so in the future when you upgrade your display to 1080p or 4k - you'll be pissed it's lower quality and have to re-rip them all again ??? That's a waste of time and effort. TIME IS MONEY. I'd rather spend the extra $100 on a HDD and keep the quality and save me hours and hours of time.

At minimum wage it costs you more in time than a HDD does to hold the full quality copy
post #8 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

*note

I have a 4770k i7 Haswell in my desktop at 4.6ghz. I have a 2600k i7 in my other PC. I have a 3570k in my HTPC. I have triple monitors on my workstation- and I can Remote desktop into the other machines from the 4770k and put one on each screen. I could encode three movies at the same time, on three locally running versions of handbrake - and I have my server too wink.gif

My reason is not really because it takes a long time to encode videos- because I think for me it probably takes a lot less than almost anyone else around here.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1473771/my-desktop-just-raped-all-my-files/0_100

I used to rip all my Blu Ray's to uncompressed, but I decided not to back them up because they were so large. I had a catastrophic HDD failure. It's much easier for me to backup a 2GB file to my network HDD cool.gif

I might add that I have fairly poor eyesight, and so I don't really notice big differences in quality (I mean I know HD from SD, but not low bitrate from high bitrate), but I do sometimes bump the audio bitrate up severely if it is an action movie.
post #9 of 31
You might have the wrong server approach then^

Consider bigger hard drives at a low cost per TB and something like FLEXRAID with parity based drive recovery option. You can back up multiple hard drives with only 1 parity drive. Save your time encoding and all that electricity it costs. Employ a better strategy to store them so that doesn't happen.
post #10 of 31
I use BDInfo to find the correct stream, then use REMixed to pull out just the movie. No menus, no previews. When I click play, the movie plays, nothing else.
post #11 of 31
I use MAKWMKV. It's great.
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

I use MAKWMKV. It's great.
That's how I pronounced it when recommending it to someone else the other night. But I'd had a lot of bourbon.

I voted 'other'. I don't shrink the files, just record them at full original quality, and ditch all the other junk on the disc, basically the same as Chronoptomist.
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by A9X-308 View Post

That's how I pronounced it when recommending it to someone else the other night. But I'd had a lot of bourbon.

I voted 'other'. I don't shrink the files, just record them at full original quality, and ditch all the other junk on the disc, basically the same as Chronoptomist.


I do the same. Ditch the crap. Main movie only.


It wasn't bourbon it was mikes lemonade smile.gif
post #14 of 31
Where do y'all get your blurays? Netflix home delivery, Redbox, buy them all? I have a large library of a certain kind of movies but I'd like to start the process of replacing all of at least the action ones with raw bluray's and then going legal.
post #15 of 31
at least 50 or 60 of my 500 or so movies are hd-dvds I bought dirt cheap on ebay and Amazon - lots of good titles like Backdraft, Transformers, Twister, Apollo 13, Casablanca, Goodfellas, Matrix Trilogy, most of the Harry Potter series, and many more available for $1 or $2 each.

I buy most of my bluray movies used - flea market, ebay, craigslist, a used music/movie/video game shop. Stuff I'm really looking forward to I get at Target, Kmart, or Amazon the day they're released.

I take most of them straight to MKV but I buy so many because I love watching special features. When I want to do that though I just put the disc in my drive, which is why I installed Total Media Theater 5. I'll watch the the movie far more often that I will the "making of" featurette.
Edited by pittsoccer33 - 8/6/13 at 6:34am
post #16 of 31
Full 1:1 rips to mkv.
post #17 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackDiesel14 View Post

Where do y'all get your blurays?
Amazon (UK), ebay and local stores like JB Hifi.
If you want a certain title today, then you usually have to pay for it, but if you're patient and watch for specials, you can pick up discs cheaply. I have a 'want' list on my phone.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

Full 1:1 rips to mkv.
+1
post #19 of 31
I guess I'm in the minority, but I think I have a different use case as well. I rip my blu-rays and convert them to 480p with stereo audio. Why? Because I use the rips to put on my iPad if I travel. The quality is fine (for me) for that use, and space is at a premium on the iPad. If I want to watch the movie in high quality, I stick the actual disc in, as I only have one HTPC, and it's in the living room (and easily accessible).

So, for that I use MakeMKV to rip them and then Handbrake to convert them.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

Full 1:1 rips to mkv.

Agreed. 1:1 for me too, no compression. I still convert all my HD audio to FLAC as well. Just makes it more portable and easier to manage.
post #21 of 31
I voted other... as it depends on the source. I'll typically use Handbrake with some tweaked settings based on the output. On a stock Core i5 3570K they can take up to 5-6 hours. With all settings maxed and CF quality at 0 I've never seen it take longer than 6 hours. With my 3770K running at 5.2GHz they typically take about 2 hours. With an 8-way E7 server I stack 10 instances of Handbrake and each encode will take about 40 minutes to an hour. With content from TV I just remove commercials with VideoReDo and remux to .mkv. With some 29.97 TV BD I'll just use eac3to and MKVMerge as the playback filters seem to do a better job than Handbrake with deinterlacing. Sometimes I'll just use eac3to and MKVMerge and skip encoding when I'm feeling lazy. Any chick flick gets 720p'd and compressed to hell.
post #22 of 31
5.2ghz eek.gif I wish my 4770k would run that.

I guess I could always bump the voltage to 1.65v. Smart idea ???
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

5.2ghz eek.gif I wish my 4770k would run that.

I guess I could always bump the voltage to 1.65v. Smart idea ???

If you've got something to keep it cold and willing to shorten it's lifespan a bit biggrin.gif
I already had one 3770K die after just a couple months running at 1.575vcore.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by itznfb View Post

I voted other... as it depends on the source. I'll typically use Handbrake with some tweaked settings based on the output. On a stock Core i5 3570K they can take up to 5-6 hours. With all settings maxed and CF quality at 0 I've never seen it take longer than 6 hours. With my 3770K running at 5.2GHz they typically take about 2 hours. With an 8-way E7 server I stack 10 instances of Handbrake and each encode will take about 40 minutes to an hour. With content from TV I just remove commercials with VideoReDo and remux to .mkv. With some 29.97 TV BD I'll just use eac3to and MKVMerge as the playback filters seem to do a better job than Handbrake with deinterlacing. Sometimes I'll just use eac3to and MKVMerge and skip encoding when I'm feeling lazy. Any chick flick gets 720p'd and compressed to hell.
Can't you just use QuickSync for that, if the goal is to compress and save space, rather than caring about image quality? (where you would not re-encode the video)
post #25 of 31
1:1 MKV remux
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Can't you just use QuickSync for that, if the goal is to compress and save space, rather than caring about image quality? (where you would not re-encode the video)

Well, let's just say there are believers and there are non-believers.
As for QuickSync.... it provides terrible PQ compared to sw encoding.
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by itznfb View Post

Well, let's just say there are believers and there are non-believers.
As for QuickSync.... it provides terrible PQ compared to sw encoding.
Perhaps if you are taking the time to tune your settings and preview the quality, it's worthwhile to use software encoding, but using the original example of reducing HD videos to 2GB, it seems like you might as well use QuickSync.

In my testing with Handbrake at the maximum quality settings, which takes considerably longer to encode than the stock settings, the smallest size I could reduce Blu-ray to was about 12-16GB (depending on the content) before quality took a big hit. If all you care about is filesize, at least QuickSync isn't going to take 10 hours.
And I have to imagine that you can't have a very large library if it's feasible to spend hours re-encoding every film. It took months to rip my library when all I was doing was a straight rip of the disc, which takes about 30 minutes.
post #28 of 31
Using x264 at placebo setting and crf 16-18, there is no visible difference between encode and original, even in still screens. Every movie is different but you can save 25-60% space pretty easily.
post #29 of 31
1:1 MKV rips. But for my iPad I encode some movies to about ~1GB size. Surprisingly good quality (Handbrake 1500kbps average bitrate, 2-pass), but encoding takes forever.
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by itznfb View Post

If you've got something to keep it cold and willing to shorten it's lifespan a bit biggrin.gif
I already had one 3770K die after just a couple months running at 1.575vcore.


Lol. I was being sarcastic. I'm on air cooling remember ?

I'm stuck at 4.5 or less realistically
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