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Does anyone in this forum actually get up and put in a disc ???? - Page 2

post #31 of 123
What's a disc? biggrin.gif
post #32 of 123
+1

Most of this seems like a monumental waste of time, effort and money to me. I almost never watch anything more than once. So I rent a disc, put it in my BD player, watch it, then return it. No ripping, no editing, no disc arrays, no servers, nothing. 2 hrs of my life and one dollar for the enjoyment of one movie.

Maybe I'm just too old for all of this stuff. Except for new releases, I pretty much seen everything I've ever wanted to see. There's no point in maintaining a vast library that will never be watched again.
Edited by mdavej - 8/7/13 at 10:34am
post #33 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdavej View Post

+1

Most of this seems like a monumental waste of time, effort and money to me. I almost never watch anything more than once. So I rent a disc, put it in my BD player, watch it, then return it. No ripping, no editing, no disc arrays, no servers, nothing. 2 hrs of my life and one dollar for the enjoyment of one movie.

Maybe I'm just too old for all of this stuff. Except for new releases, I pretty much seen everything I've ever wanted to see. There's no point in maintaining a vast library that will never be watched again.

I've noticed I never watch anything I've ripped for myself more than once with few exceptions. It's the kids' stuff that's convenient to have as an on-line library and that is how I got started ripping disks in the first place. The stuff we rent or buy (and I've asked my wife to stop buying movies) though, I hardly ever watch it more than once so it does seem a waste. It makes me wonder if I am just hoarding.
post #34 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by StardogChampion View Post

I've noticed I never watch anything I've ripped for myself more than once with few exceptions. It's the kids' stuff that's convenient to have as an on-line library and that is how I got started ripping disks in the first place. The stuff we rent or buy (and I've asked my wife to stop buying movies) though, I hardly ever watch it more than once so it does seem a waste. It makes me wonder if I am just hoarding.

I understand this philosophy for the time being, but I hesitate towards the idea that all videos be owned by the "National library of Netflix"

Redbox is just for new releases, but when I was renting discs from Netflix I ended up paying about $15 / mo for 2 at a time w/ blu ray. They didn't have everything available at the time. If you ever want to go back and watch something down the years, it will probably be difficult to obtain. I know several who feel like it's a waste from the days of owning betamax or VHS (or maybe even before) only to see their expensive, large libraries rendered unwatchable when manufacturers stopped making players for their storage format. At least our collections can be digitized, and if their format is obsoleted they might have some decent chance of being converted. Plus storage is cheap and getting cheaper, and I never pay more than $5-6 for a movie
post #35 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by StardogChampion View Post

I've noticed I never watch anything I've ripped for myself more than once with few exceptions. It's the kids' stuff that's convenient to have as an on-line library and that is how I got started ripping disks in the first place. The stuff we rent or buy (and I've asked my wife to stop buying movies) though, I hardly ever watch it more than once so it does seem a waste. It makes me wonder if I am just hoarding.
Yeah, that's why I attribute my behavior to age. My kids are old enough that they manage their own media now, so there's no need to rip or maintain a library for them anymore. The rips I did when they were young are long gone.
post #36 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdavej View Post

+1

Most of this seems like a monumental waste of time, effort and money to me. I almost never watch anything more than once. So I rent a disc, put it in my BD player, watch it, then return it. No ripping, no editing, no disc arrays, no servers, nothing. 2 hrs of my life and one dollar for the enjoyment of one movie.

Maybe I'm just too old for all of this stuff. Except for new releases, I pretty much seen everything I've ever wanted to see. There's no point in maintaining a vast library that will never be watched again.

I actually have a rotating library.. out with the old and in with the new... but some stuff stays. There are actually movies I watch more than once like Bond, Christmas movies and a few of the classics.
post #37 of 123
I do because I am using Redbox a lot these days.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdavej View Post

+1

Most of this seems like a monumental waste of time, effort and money to me. I almost never watch anything more than once.
...

Having gone through my shares of frustration having a movies skip while I am watching it, I'd have to say ripping has its value even when watching just once.
The ripping process let's you deal with all media issues upfront and not when you are all cozy'ed up.
Having my movie session ruined due to a scratched up disc is recipe for putting me in a funk as I now have to drive all the way back to exchange the disc if there is even one for the exchange.
Edited by spectrumbx - 8/7/13 at 1:34pm
post #38 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

I don't think I got up and played a disc in two years.

All the time. Gave up ripping discs as I only ever watch the same movie once a year so the cost of HD space was throwing money away. The HTPC almost never gets used now - only for downloaded rips.
post #39 of 123
I highly doubt that the vast majority of BD buyers are ripping movies to a server. More trouble than its worth. Drives fail. Software updates and copy protection schemes can hose things up. For me it's much easier to just browse my collection and put a disc in.
post #40 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

And the problem is???

Buying all the NAS equipment and drives is an unneeded expense. The other thing is taking all the time to rip those discs. I would dread that process.
post #41 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toknowshita View Post

Buying all the NAS equipment and drives is an unneeded expense. The other thing is taking all the time to rip those discs. I would dread that process.

I would guess you are in the minority in this regard. This is, after all, a home theater computer forum.
post #42 of 123
I've seen all that XMBC and stuff and yah it does look neat and a geeky thing i would like to toy with but naaaaaaaaaah. Storage rack, BD cases, pop it open and put in the disc, not going to bother tweaking software, ripping movies for hours and the the whole part about spending hundreds of dollars on hard drives...........
post #43 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingcarcas View Post

I've seen all that XMBC and stuff and yah it does look neat and a geeky thing i would like to toy with but naaaaaaaaaah. Storage rack, BD cases, pop it open and put in the disc, not going to bother tweaking software, ripping movies for hours and the the whole part about spending hundreds of dollars on hard drives...........
Hard drives are cheap and take up far less space than a shelf full of discs. Ripping doesn't take long. In fact, you probably spend less time ripping than you do sitting through the crap at the beginning of a Blu-Ray you just loaded into your BD player. The only tweaking involved is setting a few basic parameters.

It's far more convenient than you make it out to be, which tells me you probably have never actually done any of it yourself. I can view my entire movie library without having to get up and try reading the titles on the spine of a DVD case by bending my neck into an uncomfortable position and straining my eyes in low light. I can get full graphics with title descriptions and a plot synopsis without having to pull out discs and read the liner notes.

Think of it as a step up the evolutionary ladder when it comes to home entertainment. Apparently you missed a few rungs.
post #44 of 123
I rip so that I can save my neck from the dreaded "sideways head" disease...you know, the one you get when you turn your head sideways to read the writing on the side of the case as you read several hundred movies to find the one you want (as Captain said). Instead, I open up Media Browser with my remote control and look at pretty pictures of all my genres. After a quick genre decision, I click the picture and am presented with all my movies in that genre, where I make my choice via cover art without ever leaving my couch. If I change my mind part way into the movie, the remove control gets me another one.

It is all the convenience of streaming a movie but with the higher quality provided by a bluray.
post #45 of 123
Look if you enjoy ripping go ahead. The reality is many don't. I am not telling anyone not to do it. But there are some major costs associated with it. Buying NAS boxes, hard drives, and boxes to place on each set that aren't affected by Cinivia. The thought of starting ripping this late in the game with my library is daunting just from a time factor. Also some of you guys act like after you rip a disc you get rid of it. If you are selling it you are technically pirating the movie, you still have to be in possession of the original disc for fair use to apply.
post #46 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by captain_video View Post

Hard drives are cheap and take up far less space than a shelf full of discs. Ripping doesn't take long. In fact, you probably spend less time ripping than you do sitting through the crap at the beginning of a Blu-Ray you just loaded into your BD player. The only tweaking involved is setting a few basic parameters.

It's far more convenient than you make it out to be, which tells me you probably have never actually done any of it yourself. I can view my entire movie library without having to get up and try reading the titles on the spine of a DVD case by bending my neck into an uncomfortable position and straining my eyes in low light. I can get full graphics with title descriptions and a plot synopsis without having to pull out discs and read the liner notes.
.

+1. We're just short of 1000 discs now. That's a LOT of shelf space, and quite honestly requires a level of organization I just don't have time to keep up with. We watch the disc once so we can catch the previews and extras, then it gets ripped and goes into storage in our Harry Potter closet.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toknowshita View Post

Look if you enjoy ripping go ahead. The reality is many don't. I am not telling anyone not to do it. But there are some major costs associated with it. Buying NAS boxes, hard drives, and boxes to place on each set that aren't affected by Cinivia. The thought of starting ripping this late in the game with my library is daunting just from a time factor.

I always chuckle when I see people spend $4500.00 between a projector and AVR alone, then complain about the cost of a NAS. It 's quite easy to put together a 16TB NAS for under $1000.00. For playback, if you don't want to do any work on the front end, there are several excellent media players that run under $250.00. The TV in our bedroom has the PLEX client available so there's no media player needed at all, just a plex server which can be run on the same hardware as the file server. Ripping software is free, I use MakeMKV. I chose to pay for it, but that's because it's great software and the dev deserves the $50.00. I ripped a few discs a night as a background task while I was doing other things to catch up on my collection, takes me about 12-15 minutes per BR.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toknowshita View Post

Also some of you guys act like after you rip a disc you get rid of it. If you are selling it you are technically pirating the movie, you still have to be in possession of the original disc for fair use to apply.

I would say most of the people here all quite aware of the legal issues surrounding media servers and ripping your media. You're more than welcome to browse the many threads that go over the subject and post your thoughts there.
post #47 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toknowshita View Post

Look if you enjoy ripping go ahead. The reality is many don't.
Actually, the reality is that many of us that use HTPCs do rip discs. If you believe otherwise then you're in the wrong forum. Either that or you've been completely oblivious to the various topics discussed here.

FWIW, I had every disc in my collection ripped to either iso's or DVD file folders (approximately 750 movies at the time). I found that using MakeMKV and XBMC gave me better results so I re-ripped them all to mkv files. I ripped them in my spare time over a three week span and believe it was time well spent.

I currently have a server with about 24 TB of storage, give or take. I started off with just a few drives using the free version of unRAID and expanded it as my budget allowed. If TAMS Solutions still has any servers left then you won't find a better deal for getting a complete server setup dirt cheap. Check the thread discussing the cheap alternative to the Norco 4220 and 4224 servers for details.

I have three HTPCs currently in use. Only one of them has a Blu-Ray drive, and it never gets used except to load software. I also have a standalone Blu-Ray player that has been used exactly twice for a total time of about 15 minutes. I got so fed up with trying to get past the intro crap on the discs that I disconnected it and haven't used it since.

With ripped discs stored on a server, I can share my movies with any PC in the house without requiring a physical disc to insert in a drive. Playback starts immediately upon selecting a movie from my server without the extraneous crap that goes with it. Ripping discs allows me to put the original away for safekeeping and keep it in mint condition as well as having a permanent backup.

The advantages to ripping discs and having them on a server far outweigh any reasons for playing a disc directly in a drive, especially on a PC. The one major difference is the cost of the additional hardware used to store the ripped movies. OTOH, playing discs on a PC generally requires playback software and a license for AnyDVD HD. If you can afford it then you should seriously consider going with a server or NAS and ripping your movies. You don't even need a separate NAS or server if you have a small movie collection. For $100 you can get a 3TB drive to add to your PC that will hold quite a few movies.
post #48 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by captain_video View Post

Actually, the reality is that many of us that use HTPCs do rip discs. If you believe otherwise then you're in the wrong forum. Either that or you've been completely oblivious to the various topics discussed here.

FWIW, I had every disc in my collection ripped to either iso's or DVD file folders (approximately 750 movies at the time). I found that using MakeMKV and XBMC gave me better results so I re-ripped them all to mkv files. I ripped them in my spare time over a three week span and believe it was time well spent.

I currently have a server with about 24 TB of storage, give or take. I started off with just a few drives using the free version of unRAID and expanded it as my budget allowed. If TAMS Solutions still has any servers left then you won't find a better deal for getting a complete server setup dirt cheap. Check the thread discussing the cheap alternative to the Norco 4220 and 4224 servers for details.

I have three HTPCs currently in use. Only one of them has a Blu-Ray drive, and it never gets used except to load software. I also have a standalone Blu-Ray player that has been used exactly twice for a total time of about 15 minutes. I got so fed up with trying to get past the intro crap on the discs that I disconnected it and haven't used it since.

With ripped discs stored on a server, I can share my movies with any PC in the house without requiring a physical disc to insert in a drive. Playback starts immediately upon selecting a movie from my server without the extraneous crap that goes with it. Ripping discs allows me to put the original away for safekeeping and keep it in mint condition as well as having a permanent backup.

The advantages to ripping discs and having them on a server far outweigh any reasons for playing a disc directly in a drive, especially on a PC. The one major difference is the cost of the additional hardware used to store the ripped movies. OTOH, playing discs on a PC generally requires playback software and a license for AnyDVD HD. If you can afford it then you should seriously consider going with a server or NAS and ripping your movies. You don't even need a separate NAS or server if you have a small movie collection. For $100 you can get a 3TB drive to add to your PC that will hold quite a few movies.

Different strokes for different folks. Those of us who are enthusiasts see this as a hobby, and enjoy investing the time building up their collection and viewing it in an elegant presentation. Others just want to watch a movie and not be bothered with any of that. Whatever side you're on, great.
post #49 of 123
I don't know if the majority of the wider AVS forum rips discs. It makes presenting them with XBMC or whatever cooler and easier, but if you want the best possible picture quality you aren't using an HTPC. I love mine but we all know they simply can't do 23.976 playback correctly.

If those people are doing it they are probably using a Dune, Oppo, or Popcorn Hour that allows ISO and/or folders. But I think those users will still be bit by Cinavia.
post #50 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsoccer33 View Post

I don't know if the majority of the wider AVS forum rips discs. It makes presenting them with XBMC or whatever cooler and easier, but if you want the best possible picture quality you aren't using an HTPC. I love mine but we all know they simply can't do 23.976 playback correctly.

If those people are doing it they are probably using a Dune, Oppo, or Popcorn Hour that allows ISO and/or folders. But I think those users will still be bit by Cinavia.

Huh??
post #51 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by cybrsage View Post

I rip so that I can save my neck from the dreaded "sideways head" disease...you know, the one you get when you turn your head sideways to read the writing on the side of the case as you read several hundred movies to find the one you want (as Captain said). .

Storing the disks in nice binders, or storing them horizontally instead of vertically, solves that problem.
Quote:
Originally Posted by captain_video View Post

The advantages to ripping discs and having them on a server far outweigh any reasons for playing a disc directly in a drive, especially on a PC.

Opinion... not fact. Us 'anti-rippers' could argue the opposite is true.
post #52 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by captain_video View Post

Hard drives are cheap and take up far less space than a shelf full of discs. Ripping doesn't take long.

umm, cheap as in $100 a piece. You need a bunch of them. You need another PC or NAS. You need to provide power. It's extra physical space above and beyond discs.

It's not like you rip the disc then throw it out or sell it. You still need to store it somewhere.

The # of people that spend the time to rip and store media is extremely small. It may be nice to see the pretty picture of your media in XBMC but it's a waste of space/money for movies that you will hardly ever watch.

Total geek factor. Don't get me wrong, I did it for years. Then last year sat down and was like WTF? I have all this stuff ripped for really no reason at all. Just as easy to get up and grab a disc and use my BD player.
post #53 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by mslide View Post

Storing the disks in nice binders, or storing them horizontally instead of vertically, solves that problem.

True, but the huge space required to store 1000 bluray's in their cases is pretty significant. I chuck mine on a pile in the back of a closet. smile.gif
post #54 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by captain_video View Post

You don't even need a separate NAS or server if you have a small movie collection. For $100 you can get a 3TB drive to add to your PC that will hold quite a few movies.

My motherboard supports eight SATA drives...and I have all of them filled up with drives and the BluRay. I added a four port SATA (2 PCIe channel) card to add in two more SATA drives. I did not want all the complications that arise with streaming across the network so they are all local to the HTPC. One box to rule them all! smile.gif
post #55 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

Huh??

The easiest way to watch a movie set to 24p without worrying about dropping frames or your video becoming out of sync is not a computer. I don't know how anyone could argue otherwise.
post #56 of 123
Another big plus for me is the fact that my family and friends would literally never put the disc back in the appropriate box. I'd end up checking them every month most likely, and several would just end up stacked flat on a shelf in no case whatsoever
post #57 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by almostinsane View Post

umm, cheap as in $100 a piece. You need a bunch of them. You need another PC or NAS. You need to provide power. It's extra physical space above and beyond discs.

It's not like you rip the disc then throw it out or sell it. You still need to store it somewhere.

The # of people that spend the time to rip and store media is extremely small. It may be nice to see the pretty picture of your media in XBMC but it's a waste of space/money for movies that you will hardly ever watch.

Total geek factor. Don't get me wrong, I did it for years. Then last year sat down and was like WTF? I have all this stuff ripped for really no reason at all. Just as easy to get up and grab a disc and use my BD player.
Go back and reread the entire post. I indicated you could install the extra drive in your HTPC. The number of drives you need all depends on how big your movie collection is. Start off with one and see how you like it.

FYI - the amount of space my server occupies is but a fraction of the space required to store the same number of Blu-Rays and DVDs on physical media. I keep my discs in a box in the back of a closet so they don't take up usable space. The server sits in a utility room next to my home theater setup.

If I had to use a standalone player I'd probably spend more on the player than I have on my server, but that's just me. The last DVD player I bought cost me $1600 and I ended up giving it away for next to nothing on ebay.

To each his own. If playing the disc in a standalone player floats your boat then that's perfectly fine. Everybody has their own reasons for ripping or not ripping discs. It's all good.

OTOH, there had to be a good reason why you ripped your media in the first place, but only you know the answer to that question.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cybrsage View Post

My motherboard supports eight SATA drives...and I have all of them filled up with drives and the BluRay. I added a four port SATA (2 PCIe channel) card to add in two more SATA drives. I did not want all the complications that arise with streaming across the network so they are all local to the HTPC. One box to rule them all! smile.gif
What complications? Ever since I re-ripped my isos and DVD folders to mkvs and started using XBMC I haven't had a single issue streaming movies over my network. A single PC stuffed with drives is fine if that's the only one you're using for playback. However, I have several HTPCs and I need to share media between them. A server and a home network is the best solution for my scenario.
Edited by captain_video - 8/8/13 at 10:46am
post #58 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsoccer33 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

Huh??

The easiest way to watch a movie set to 24p without worrying about dropping frames or your video becoming out of sync is not a computer. I don't know how anyone could argue otherwise.

You didn't have that caveat in your original post. You said it was the best way, not the easiest way. My dropped/repeated frame interval is orders of magnitude larger than the length of a movie itself. Also, how do you know if these players are dropping/repeating frames or doing exact 23.976fps playback anyway?
post #59 of 123
I said best quality. The devices with the highest quality video playback are high end dedicated video players, not personal computers that can't output the correct frame rate. I don't care how often you drop frames. It's happening and it doesn't on better equipment.

I love my htpc but its just not the highest quality playback device.
post #60 of 123
Does it really matter whether you rip or just play a disc?

A HTPC can play both equally as well anyway, so you can do either or a mixture of both.

IMO that's what is so great about a HTPC it gives you so many choices and options, so you can go down whatever route you prefer.
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