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Hip Hop Thread - Page 2

post #31 of 173

Original video (with poor sound quality)

 

 

Live version (with better sound)

 

post #32 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tack View Post

This probably sounds blasphemous, but I see lots of similarities between hardcore rap, punk and metal.
 

 

Far from being "blasphemous", I'm sure many of the creators of hip-hop would completely agree with that statement, and have probably said so on numerous occasions. And many strove to incorporate elements of those genres, and others, in their music. (Goth and reggae were somewhere in their as well.)

 

It was also not unusual for live events to mix the genres, and sometimes the moshing at the punk acts would spill over into the hip-hop acts, for example. And some of the hip-hoppers (myself included) would also stick around to listen to, or do a little moshing at the punk acts. (Some HH acts also had moshpits btw.) The relationship between the different groups may not always have been totally amorous, but most of the time, the crowds were pretty cool, and there was definitely a mutual respect and an interaction between them.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tack View Post

While sounding different, they all share the same theme and that theme is "**** You".
 

 

If you mean "FU" in terms of the lameness of the music you're used to listening to (mostly disco and soft rock at the time these other genres originated), then I'd somewhat agree with that also. I think the reasons hip-hop artists do what they do are as varied as the artists themselves though. And many simply affect an FU attitude because they think it'll help sell records or DLs.

 

Some time ago, I described hip-hop here as "taking the old and making it new, and making it yours", and I think that's still a pretty good description today. In addition to the originality and artistry of the rhythms, rhymes, lyrics and arrangements (and their delivery/performance), that's pretty much what I look for in good hip-hop. It also has to move me in some way though, either emotionally or physically (or preferably a little of both, though I'll take the latter, if they can't do the former).


Edited by ADU - 8/24/13 at 2:22pm
post #33 of 173
I was a huge Fat Boys fan. Even loved their movie Disorderlies. I'd walk up and down the hall in elementary school and around the house beat boxing. Drove people nuts smile.gif
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=jJewbFZHI34#
post #34 of 173
I saw the Beastie Boys in 94. Absolute top of the game.
post #35 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by darthrsg View Post

I saw the Beastie Boys in 94. Absolute top of the game.
I had tix to Rage and Beasties til Mike D wrecked his bike, broke his shoulder and cancelled the Fing tour. Wtf!?! He couldn't hold the mic with his other hand? Neither have played ATL since frown.gif
post #36 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by ambesolman View Post

I had tix to Rage and Beasties til Mike D wrecked his bike, broke his shoulder and cancelled the Fing tour. Wtf!?! He couldn't hold the mic with his other hand? Neither have played ATL since frown.gif
Tribe Called Quest came on right after followed by George Clinton. Lollapalooza 94 was pretty damn boss.
post #37 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by darthrsg View Post

Tribe Called Quest came on right after followed by George Clinton. Lollapalooza 94 was pretty damn boss.
Thanks. Thanks a lot .ilii
post #38 of 173
post #39 of 173

Hard to argue with any of it. I turned the radio off in 98-99 and haven't looked back. It was so bad you could set your watch to Van Halen tracks and you'd be begging for a damn b-side. Most any music with a message disappeared around that time too or at least you really had to dig for it.
post #40 of 173
Thread Starter 

Some of the older stuff in the article was informative and cool to read but as it got a little closer to oresent day it really lost its place.

People like Kweli and Mos Def were doing stuff with a message around the time of Dead Prez. Also left out current people like Brother Ali, Sage Fracis and B. Dolan, Toki Wright and others.

With that said here's a video featuring some of the people I mentioned.
post #41 of 173
post #42 of 173
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by darthrsg View Post


Classic. The MTV version was so heavily edited it sounded like a totally different song.
post #43 of 173

 

I like the distinction it draws between "rap" and "hip-hop". And I've probably also made the mistake of confusing the two, even though they aren't the same thing.

 

Hip-hop isn't really a style of music per se. It's more of an attitude (specifically the one described in my last post about taking the old, making it new, and making it yours). And there are probably artists in just about every genre or style of music now who would qualify as "hip-hop".

 

Artists like Beyonce, J-Lo, Justin T., Rihanna and Usher don't rap in their music as a rule, for example. But they're still "hip-hop" imo because they take an old genre, like R&B, and make it new (and their own) by blending it with different styles and other hip-hop elements,... including rap.

 

You can see the hip-hop influence in other musical genres as well, including some of the bachata I've been listening to lately.

 

A popular fad right now in bachata is doing covers of R&B or other "older" styles of music. Leslie Grace's version of The Shirelles' "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow" posted here is one example. Here are a few others...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foyH-TEs9D0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOx3dAO4kMY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpzT6Wq6pKY

 

In most covers, the artist will simply "redo" the tune in their own style or milieu. What Royce, Grace, and others of the hip-hop generation will often do though is blend the old styles (R&B on the first two tracks above, and Mariachi on the third) with the new. During the course of their songs, they actually switch back and forth between them, literally taking the old and making it new. And they "tag" it with their name, like a graffiti artist, so you know it's theirs.

 

That's the hip-hop influence imo. And it shows they're not going to be bound or limited by the traditional conventions of a particular style (even though they may respect and admire them in many cases).

 

The article also makes the point that the original message of hip-hop has been somewhat lost in mainstream hip-hop, which I'd agree with in one sense.

 

The messages may not generally be as obvious as in Grandmaster Flash's "The Message", for example.

 

 

But they are still there imo, if you know what to look for.

 


Edited by ADU - 8/21/13 at 4:40pm
post #44 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by SupaKats View Post


Some of the older stuff in the article was informative and cool to read but as it got a little closer to oresent day it really lost its place.
 

 

I tend to agree with this, for some of the reasons stated in my last post.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SupaKats View Post

Also left out current people like Brother Ali, Sage Fracis and B. Dolan, Toki Wright and others.

With that said here's a video featuring some of the people I mentioned.

 

Not really feelin that track as much as some of the others you've posted so far. (A bit too contrived and instructional for my taste.) You can't necessarily judge a person's work from just one tune though.

 

Haven't heard a whole lot of A. Banks' work yet either, but on this track anyway (which samples a classic house beat by Lone), she seems a bit more my style.

 

Explicite lyrics on this btw.

 


Edited by ADU - 8/18/13 at 9:42pm
post #45 of 173
Sounds like Die Antwoord sort of.
post #46 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by darthrsg View Post

Sounds like Die Antwoord sort of.

 

Interesting group. Enjoyed readin a bit about "zef" culture.

 

I think Azealia's probably a little closer to the more housey up-tempo rap style of Nicki Minaj and Flo-Rida on that track. She seems to have her own unique style and "flow" though. And I like the funky vibe on that track, and the way the more lyrical bits are mixed in with the rap.

post #47 of 173

A couple recent mainstream tracks that are a bit more overtly message-oriented (just to prove they exist)...

 


Edited by ADU - 8/19/13 at 1:48pm
post #48 of 173

 

I like the dembow (the "dunk-ka-dunka" in the percussion) on this track, which is an element of reggaeton. Some other examples of dembow/reggaeton (which are also very "hip-hop" imo) to illustrate what I mean...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXtJkDHEAAc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9a2yPracWA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNsz8ed6WNg


Edited by ADU - 8/21/13 at 4:28pm
post #49 of 173

Brother Mathers released a new single yesterday. What y'all think... dope or whack?

 

post #50 of 173
First listen. WACK. It is interesting however.
post #51 of 173

Copy that. 1 Whack & 0 Dopes so far for "Berzerk".

post #52 of 173

Nother one by AB that I rather like. (This is gettin very "house" btw. Makes me feel like voguin'.)

 

post #53 of 173

Some dope rhymes/beats from back in the day by new school innovators EB&R.

 

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post #58 of 173

Some more laid back classics from Cube, and Will & Jeff. (Explicite lyrics on some of these.)

 


Edited by ADU - 9/1/13 at 8:45pm
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post #60 of 173

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