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Seeing Ultra-D For Myself

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 

Mark Henninger (imagic) recently saw a demo of a glasses-free 3D system called Ultra-D from Stream TV Networks at the company's headquarters in Philadelphia, PA, and he wrote a great article about his experience here. Last week, I saw a similar demo, and I have to say I was just as impressed as he was.

 

In my case, the demo was held on a green-screen sound stage at Stereoscope, a 3D production and post-production facility in Burbank, CA. On hand was a prototype 50" UHD LED-LCD panel with Ultra-D capabilities built by Stream TV in the Netherlands. Sources included a couple of 3D Blu-ray players and a Windows PC with some preprocessed content and the Ultra-D format converter. The system was optimized for a viewing distance of 9-15 feet on a 50" screen.

 

Before I get to the demo, let me explain how Ultra-D works (at least, as far as I've been told). It's a 3-part solution that consists of hardware, firmware, and a proprietary content format. The hardware is a multi-layered optical system bonded to a UHD panel. The firmware controls the underlying panel at the subpixel level so it can take advantage of the optical system bonded to it. Lastly, the content must be in the Ultra-D format to be displayed correctly. Since no native Ultra-D content exists yet (tools for the creative community will be released at some point in the future), Stream TV has created the SeeCube—a module that converts any 2D or standard stereoscopic signal into the Ultra-D format in real time. As I mentioned earlier, in the demo I saw, the converter was a PC, but I was told that the SeeCube bundled with the initial screens will be  a much smaller box  And Stream TV's R&D facility in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, is working with a major chip manufacturer to implement the conversion functionality  in a chip. The 3D rendering in the demo panel was already in chip form.

 

 

The optical system consists of several refractive and diffractive layers that, combined with how the LCD subpixels are manipulated by the firmware, project the light from those subpixels out into the space in front of the panel, creating what's called a light field. This generates stereopsis, a sense of depth when viewed with two eyes.

 

According to Stream TV's white paper, "Virtual and partial subpixels merge in the space and form complete and separate views for each eye of the viewer. Then the viewer's brain takes over, processing them in the same natural way as it is used to in the real world, creating a natural 3D experience. It is very different from 3D display technologies with glasses, which only project two discrete views of a scene. With Ultra-D technology, the viewing areas (light fields) are repeated in a horizontal way, and the transitions between these areas are smooth. So a viewing area is not divided into discrete viewing zones (cones) as is done in most other technologies, but the optical system creates an almost continuous light field in front of the screen."

 

Because Ultra-D creates a light field rather than two fixed views, it can also reproduce motion parallax, which is the effect you see when objects in your field of view seem to move with respect to each other when you move around them. This does not depend on stereopsis and can be used by those with partial or complete stereo blindness to experience a sense of depth. Apparently, Ultra-D detects objects that are partially occluding (blocking the sight of) other objects and extrapolates what you can't see behind the object in front. When you move while looking at the screen, the objects seem to move relative to each other, allowing you to perceive motion parallax.

 

First up in the demo was some content that had been preprocessed into the Ultra-D format, including footage of an Olympic gymnast on the pommel horse and a computer-generated space station, both of which looked phenomenal. The gymnast was shot in stereo 1080p and upconverted, while the space-station footage was generated in native 2160p stereo. Unlike passive-polarized or lenticular autostereo 3D displays—in which the vertical resolution is cut in half for each eye—the Ultra-D system combines the two 2160p images into one 2160p light field. I haven't yet been able to fully visualize the physics of this, but I will continue to investigate until I can.

 

Next, we looked at the 3D Blu-ray of Avatar, upconverted to 2160p. Keep in mind that the display must receive a signal in the proprietary Ultra-D format, so all signals that haven't been preprocessed into that format must be converted in real time. The amount of "depth" can be adjusted by the user, and high settings can soften the image. At 100%, Avatar looked distinctly fuzzy, but at 50% or so, it was sharp and clear with excellent 3D depth.

 

We also looked at a bit of the 2D version of The Avengers, and the conversion was quite good, though not as good as starting with a 3D signal. With a 2D source, Ultra-D looks at various depth cues and derives its 3D image from them. At 100% depth, the image was quite soft, but at 50%, it looked nice and sharp with a somewhat less pronounced 3D effect.

 

As I walked around the panel, I noticed the image wavering slightly as my eyes changed position with respect to the light field, though this wavering was less than on most autostereo displays I've seen. Grazina Seskeviciute, 3D Content Specialist for Stream TV, assured me that the company is still working on reducing this effect. And it was not a problem when I sat in one location, even if I moved my head around.

 

I also tested the 3D effect very close to and far from the screen. Up close, the image broke up, looking disjointed and weird. At 30 feet, it looked like a 2D image with no apparent depth at all. As I mentioned earlier, the prototype was optimized for a viewing distance of 9-15 feet, which is too far from a 50" display, especially UHD, but it's probably realistic for most viewers.

 

One thing I definitely wanted to ask about was watching 2D content in 2D. Seskeviciute turned down the depth to 0 and said, "you tell me." At a distance of 12 feet or so, it looked fine; I saw nothing to complain about in a relatively quick look. But up close, I could see the pixels—on a UHD display—and there were diagonal lines between them. Apparently, the refractive/diffractive optical system has a magnifying effect. Back at the optimized viewing distance, I could not see the pixels or the diagonal lines separating them. Still, I'd love to look at 2D content displayed in 2D on an Ultra-D set next to a conventional UHD set of the same size to see if there are any subtle artifacts I might have missed.

 

As you may already know, Ultra-D has one major competitor—Dolby 3D—and both are based on technology originally developed by Philips. Stream TV and Dolby both licensed the basic tech from Philips, then developed it in two different directions. Stream TV's new advancements include the light field, the SeeCube real-time conversion capability, and new bonding methods for mass production. I've seen prototypes of Dolby 3D flat panels, and I was very impressed by them as well. It will be interesting to see which one makes it into the consumer marketplace first. Speaking of which, Stream TV has announced that Chinese maker Hisense will make an Ultra-D TV, first for the Chinese market in early 2014, then elsewhere. The company is in final stages of negotiation with a major Japanese brand as well and expects to announce additional brand partners later this year.

 

 

Ultra-D is clearly intended for watching everything in 3D, be it 2D or 3D content, so if 3D is your thing, this is big news—high-quality, full-resolution 3D images with no glasses or fixed viewing zones. On the other hand, if you prize 2D over 3D, it might not be for you, though once you see it for yourself, you might become a convert. Either way, it's a fascinating technology, and I intend to follow its development and emergence in the marketplace.

 

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post #2 of 42
I guess I'd rather have a more accurate UHD 2D experience (higher bit depth, greater color gamut, etc.). I find 3D to be more of a distraction than, say, a really good object oriented surround mix. Give me that instead. biggrin.gif
post #3 of 42
Hi Scott
Thanks for the article on 3D. What a change in the last 55 years. Can remember seeing the first 3d at my local theater - The Grand.
And I thought 3d was GRAND. Have a 58inch Cinemawide Vizio that uses passive glasses. I'm happy with that - but can't wait to see this new technology.
What are the prospects of having a 3d projector that uses no glasses?
It would really be nice if they brought a home theater truck on the road to all the major cities soon. I'm sure it would generate lots of response and lots of pre-sales.
Always enjoy your articles and watching your broadcasts. Keep up the great work.
Any news of "Sorcerer" by Freidkin coming out this Fall. Can't wait much longer.
Thanks
BruceWayne
post #4 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by waynebruce View Post

Hi Scott
Thanks for the article on 3D. What a change in the last 55 years. Can remember seeing the first 3d at my local theater - The Grand.
And I thought 3d was GRAND. Have a 58inch Cinemawide Vizio that uses passive glasses. I'm happy with that - but can't wait to see this new technology.
What are the prospects of having a 3d projector that uses no glasses?
It would really be nice if they brought a home theater truck on the road to all the major cities soon. I'm sure it would generate lots of response and lots of pre-sales.
Always enjoy your articles and watching your broadcasts. Keep up the great work.
Any news of "Sorcerer" by Freidkin coming out this Fall. Can't wait much longer.
Thanks
BruceWayne

Thanks for the kind words! I see no glasses-free projection system on the horizon; Ultra-D relies on a special optical layer bonded to the panel, and I think Dolby 3D does too, but I'm not sure about that. In any event, I can't see how glasses-free 3D could be accomplished with a projected image; for that, I think we have to wait for full motion holography, which is many years away IMO.

post #5 of 42
Scott,

This is a very exciting technology and I was not expecting high quality glasses free 3D this soon. When this technology is refined and "reasonably" priced UHD sets are available ($3,500 for a 65" and $5,000 for an 80" maybe) I predict that this will be the must have set that will wow everyone. I love 3D but hate wearing the glasses since I wear glasses myself and I am distracted with adjusting the glasses all the time.

This technology is actually keeping me on the fence about installing the projector in my theater room. I designed the room with room for a hidden drop down electric screen in the soffit above the plasma tv but I keep thinking the future is a huge 120" glasses free LCD. Most likely I should go ahead and purchase the screen and projector for 2D only and then upgrade my 65" plasma when a 75" or 80" UHD glasses free solution is available. But man would it be nice to wait for a reasonably priced ($6,000 ??) 4K / UHD LED projector.... so many new technologies affecting everyone's purchases.

I am happy to see this technology advance. Thanks for your insights.
post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post



Before I get to the demo, let me explain how Ultra-D works (at least, as far as I've been told). It's a 3-part solution that consists of hardware, firmware, and a proprietary content format. The hardware is a multi-layered optical system bonded to a UHD panel. The firmware controls the underlying panel at the subpixel level so it can take advantage of the optical system bonded to it. Lastly, the content must be in the Ultra-D format to be displayed correctly. Since no native Ultra-D content exists yet (tools for the creative community will be released at some point in the future), Stream TV has created the SeeCube—a module that converts any 2D or standard stereoscopic signal into the Ultra-D format in real time. As I mentioned earlier, in the demo I saw, the converter was a PC, but I was told that the SeeCube bundled with the initial screens will be  a much smaller box  And Stream TV's R&D facility in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, is working with a major chip manufacturer to implement the conversion functionality  in a chip. The 3D rendering in the demo panel was already in chip form.




The optical system consists of several refractive and diffractive layers that, combined with how the LCD subpixels are manipulated by the firmware, project the light from those subpixels out into the space in front of the panel, creating what's called a light field. This generates stereopsis, a sense of depth when viewed with two eyes.

According to Stream TV's white paper, "Virtual and partial subpixels merge in the space and form complete and separate views for each eye of the viewer. Then the viewer's brain takes over, processing them in the same natural way as it is used to in the real world, creating a natural 3D experience. It is very different from 3D display technologies with glasses, which only project two discrete views of a scene. With Ultra-D technology, the viewing areas (light fields) are repeated in a horizontal way, and the transitions between these areas are smooth. So a viewing area is not divided into discrete viewing zones (cones) as is done in most other technologies, but the optical system creates an almost continuous light field in front of the screen."
i think i might have to ask for a refund on my physics degree cause i still have no idea how this can work, haha. i can't wait until some in-depth scientific explanation is provided. i think this is extremely interesting, and i'd love to bring this discussion into the classroom, but not until i'm comfortable enough to answer questions.
Quote:
Because Ultra-D creates a light field rather than two fixed views, it can also reproduce motion parallax, which is the effect you see when objects in your field of view seem to move with respect to each other when you move around them. This does not depend on stereopsis and can be used by those with partial or complete stereo blindness to experience a sense of depth. Apparently, Ultra-D detects objects that are partially occluding (blocking the sight of) other objects and extrapolates what you can't see behind the object in front. When you move while looking at the screen, the objects seem to move relative to each other, allowing you to perceive motion parallax.
this is something i will pay attention to from here on out. i had no idea they were even working on this, let alone figure out a way to make it possible without head gear. i remember seeing a video years ago of a guy who used a wii remote to track his head and developed a program to show 3D depth on a 2D image by adjusting the image like is described above. he put his glasses on his camera and moved it around and it was instantly the most realistic 3D i'd ever seen(blind in one eye). i thought it would be amazing for video games, but figured it'd never happen since it could only track one person at a time. so this is fantastic news for me
Quote:
One thing I definitely wanted to ask about was watching 2D content in 2D. Seskeviciute turned down the depth to 0 and said, "you tell me." At a distance of 12 feet or so, it looked fine; I saw nothing to complain about in a relatively quick look. But up close, I could see the pixels—on a UHD display—and there were diagonal lines between them. Apparently, the refractive/diffractive optical system has a magnifying effect. Back at the optimized viewing distance, I could not see the pixels or the diagonal lines separating them. Still, I'd love to look at 2D content displayed in 2D on an Ultra-D set next to a conventional UHD set of the same size to see if there are any subtle artifacts I might have missed.
first off, thank you for asking this question, and testing it as much as they would allow. this is still a major concern of mine. if this system becomes the standard or is viewed as a must have feature on premiere models, i want to make sure i can still buy top quality 2D displays. seems there will still be some debate on whether or not 3D will reduce 2D quality or not.
Quote:
Ultra-D is clearly intended for watching everything in 3D, be it 2D or 3D content, so if 3D is your thing, this is big news—high-quality, full-resolution 3D images with no glasses or fixed viewing zones. On the other hand, if you prize 2D over 3D, it might not be for you, though once you see it for yourself, you might become a convert. Either way, it's a fascinating technology, and I intend to follow its development and emergence in the marketplace.

again, i hope they can find a way to produce a tv with glasses free 3D that looks identical to a comparable 2D tv. i just don't think i could personally choose 3D at the expense of 2D performance. even if this does involve everything being shown in 3D, as long as when i view it(with one eye) it looks as good as a 2D version
post #7 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by farsider3000 View Post

Scott,

This is a very exciting technology and I was not expecting high quality glasses free 3D this soon. When this technology is refined and "reasonably" priced UHD sets are available ($3,500 for a 65" and $5,000 for an 80" maybe) I predict that this will be the must have set that will wow everyone. I love 3D but hate wearing the glasses since I wear glasses myself and I am distracted with adjusting the glasses all the time.

This technology is actually keeping me on the fence about installing the projector in my theater room. I designed the room with room for a hidden drop down electric screen in the soffit above the plasma tv but I keep thinking the future is a huge 120" glasses free LCD. Most likely I should go ahead and purchase the screen and projector for 2D only and then upgrade my 65" plasma when a 75" or 80" UHD glasses free solution is available. But man would it be nice to wait for a reasonably priced ($6,000 ??) 4K / UHD LED projector.... so many new technologies affecting everyone's purchases.

I am happy to see this technology advance. Thanks for your insights.

no sense in worrying about what's more than 2yrs away. by the time there's 100" plus flat screens for less than the price of a car, or LED projectors with reference quality blacks(let alone a UHD version) that's less than 10k, or by the sounds of it, even a single north american glasses free tv, your projector will have provided you with thousands of hours of use and probably be ready for an upgrade anyway. and there will be some even better, even cheaper, even larger technology in prototype phase just to keep you wondering. if you play the waiting game with electronics, you'll never enjoy anything

having had a projector, i don't think there's anything coming down the pipe worth giving up the projector for. the only thing i'll replace my projector with is another projector(led/laser maybe in a few years) or a flexible OLED panel of equal size. it simply wouldn't be possible for me to get a 100+ inch flat screen into my home, and it'd never be worth the burden.
post #8 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post

Thanks for the kind words! I see no glasses-free projection system on the horizon; Ultra-D relies on a special optical layer bonded to the panel, and I think Dolby 3D does too, but I'm not sure about that. In any event, I can't see how glasses-free 3D could be accomplished with a projected image; for that, I think we have to wait for full motion holography, which is many years away IMO.

the only thing i could possible imagine that could achieve this would be a combination of a special screen, and two projectors mounted off center. perhaps they could engineer some kind of screen that could use the different angles each projector hits the screen at, to produce a similar effect. although i'm guessing this would result in more of that 'viewing cone' type thing. if projectors weren't niche enough, such a system certainly would be
post #9 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Hitchman View Post

I guess I'd rather have a more accurate UHD 2D experience (higher bit depth, greater color gamut, etc.). I find 3D to be more of a distraction than, say, a really good object oriented surround mix. Give me that instead. biggrin.gif

You can have enhanced audio, that's not related to the display. Also, since Ultra-D is display-agnostic it will benefit from any/all improvements in bit depth and gamut that a future UHD standard might provide.

As it stands, the light field 3D effect is a far more impressive visual enhancement than what increased gamut or bit depth can promise. Autostereoscopic 3D and UHD resolution are major steps. A larger color gamut would go to waste for the vast majority of material out there, and 10-bit or 12-bit video would look identical to 8-bit video 95% of the time.
Edited by imagic - 8/15/13 at 7:33am
post #10 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

You can have enhanced audio, that's not related to the display. Also, since Ultra-D is display-agnostic it will benefit from any/all improvements in bit depth and gamut that a future UHD standard might provide.

As it stands, the light field 3D effect is a far more impressive visual enhancement than what increased gamut or bit depth can promise. Autostereoscopic 3D and UHD resolution are major steps. A larger color gamut would go to waste for the vast majority of material out there, and 10-bit or 12-bit video would look identical to 8-bit video 95% of the time.

I don't like what 3D does to the quality of cinematography (becomes ever more gimmicky) and even in the best 3D originated movies I've seen they always have some scenes that look like layered, flat cardboard cutouts. Digital stereoscopic cinematography is still not how we humans view the world and it looks unnatural since only the DP can tell you where to focus your attention. If I want to see real 3D, I can step outside. biggrin.gif No headaches or eye aches or lousy cinematography there!
post #11 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Hitchman View Post

I don't like what 3D does to the quality of cinematography (becomes ever more gimmicky) and even in the best 3D originated movies I've seen they always have some scenes that look like layered, flat cardboard cutouts. Digital stereoscopic cinematography is still not how we humans view the world and it looks unnatural since only the DP can tell you where to focus your attention. If I want to see real 3D, I can step outside. biggrin.gif No headaches or eye aches or lousy cinematography there!

Ultra-D is not the same thing as traditional stereoscopic 3D. If you like the "real 3D" of reality, you might end up liking this HDTV. All I'm suggesting is "don't knock it until you see it." When you step outside, are Superman, Iron Man, and Captain Kirk there? Do you step right into Pandora? Do you become a part of a video game? If not, there might still be a use for a TV like this.
post #12 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by fierce_gt View Post

no sense in worrying about what's more than 2yrs away. by the time there's 100" plus flat screens for less than the price of a car, or LED projectors with reference quality blacks(let alone a UHD version) that's less than 10k, or by the sounds of it, even a single north american glasses free tv, your projector will have provided you with thousands of hours of use and probably be ready for an upgrade anyway. and there will be some even better, even cheaper, even larger technology in prototype phase just to keep you wondering. if you play the waiting game with electronics, you'll never enjoy anything

having had a projector, i don't think there's anything coming down the pipe worth giving up the projector for. the only thing i'll replace my projector with is another projector(led/laser maybe in a few years) or a flexible OLED panel of equal size. it simply wouldn't be possible for me to get a 100+ inch flat screen into my home, and it'd never be worth the burden.

Fierce... I think you are right. My plan is to purchase one of the upcoming projectors from JVC or Sony that will be announced soon. My room is dying for a big screen (that's actually a 65" on the wall):

post #13 of 42
it does seem that most ppl's complaints with 3D aren't directly related to 3D, but concerns about how 3D will affect the content, and industry as a whole, and the perception of 2D.

will 3D become the expected format? or remain a choice? it makes more sense financially to pick one format, and that's what worries me. will there me enough 2D money left to support that format?

i'm also worried that something similar to the LED/CCFL thing will happen. i personally HATE HATE HATE edge-lit LED backlights. i will never own one by choice, and the couple that did make their way into my home temporarily were without doubt the worst displays i've ever owned. they were entirely unwatchable without the lights on full. but, the market has put LED backlighting as the premiere system, and in order to get a CCFL backlit LCD panel, you need to accept the low to mid quality panels they put in front of them. this was actually what i was forced to do after trying the LED. i traded it in for the much better CCFL backlight, that was unfortunately attached to a much worse panel. it was a samsung, and the highest CCFL they made at the time was a 6-series.


i'm hoping the inability for this to work with front projection, along with the increased popularity of front projection will keep the 2D format alive for many more years. and if that's the case, then the improvements in 3D will be welcomed
post #14 of 42
I bet it will cost 10000 to buy
post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by waynebruce View Post

Any news of "Sorcerer" by Freidkin coming out this Fall. Can't wait much longer.
BruceWayne

Friedkin has tweeted that a new print is ready for theatrical rerelease. SORCERER will premiere on August 29th at the Venice Film Festival. He said a Blu-ray is coming but didn't give a timeline. Speculation is Spring 2014. This info is from the Home Theater Forum.
post #16 of 42
The TV show that is screaming for a 3D tech advancement like this is the golf tournament. Watching golf on TV in 2D has been always so disappointing, especially not being able to see the undulations of the greens.
post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by easycruise View Post

The TV show that is screaming for a 3D tech advancement like this is the golf tournament. Watching golf on TV in 2D has been always so disappointing, especially not being able to see the undulations of the greens.


yeah. millions of americans are waiting to watch golf in 3D rolleyes.gif
post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oniichan View Post

yeah. millions of americans are waiting to watch golf in 3D rolleyes.gif

13.5 million americans watched the final round of this years ( and last years) Master's golf tournament on TV, according to the ratings. Check the facts before you make a fool out of yourself, OK?
post #19 of 42
I just bought a new 80 inch Vizio 3D TV, trust me, I didn't buy it to watch golf tongue.gif

ohhh, 13.5 million over a 2 year period? so that = 6.25 million per year biggrin.gif
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oniichan View Post

I just bought a new 80 inch Vizio 3D TV, trust me, I didn't buy it to watch golf tongue.gif

ohhh, 13.5 million over a 2 year period? so that = 6.25 million per year biggrin.gif

No, 13.5 each year. Reading comprehension problems? You ignored the parenthesis. Anyways, it is millions, many millions. Good luck with those soon to be outdated, bulky 3D glasses you will have to wear with your Vizio.
post #21 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by easycruise View Post

No, 13.5 each year. Reading comprehension problems? You ignored the parenthesis. Anyways, it is millions, many millions. Good luck with those soon to be outdated, bulky 3D glasses you will have to wear with your Vizio.

Vizio 3D glasses are passive, not bulky at all. Soon-to-be-outdated, sure next year there will be glasses-free options on the market—but not at anywhere near the same price point.
post #22 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

Vizio 3D glasses are passive, not bulky at all. Soon-to-be-outdated, sure next year there will be glasses-free options on the market—but not at anywhere near the same price point.

what he said, smile.gif
post #23 of 42
hi you did not see the production unit with chip
you should ask for another demo
the 2d quality will be quite good

the tv are very economical
post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post

Thanks for the kind words! I see no glasses-free projection system on the horizon; Ultra-D relies on a special optical layer bonded to the panel, and I think Dolby 3D does too, but I'm not sure about that. In any event, I can't see how glasses-free 3D could be accomplished with a projected image; for that, I think we have to wait for full motion holography, which is many years away IMO.
post #25 of 42
scott you really need to see the production unit should reach out to streams la office .
big improvement
also there is a 2d to 2d option if you want to use it like a regular tv
post #26 of 42
Quote:
Lastly, the content must be in the Ultra-D format to be displayed correctly. Since no native Ultra-D content exists yet (tools for the creative community will be released at some point in the future), Stream TV has created the SeeCube—a module that converts any 2D or standard stereoscopic signal into the Ultra-D format in real time. 

 

This is the part I'm concerned about...does it preserve the true stereoscopy of a real 3D source? I'm not interested in any sort of 2D-3D conversion.

post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathu rajan View Post

scott you really need to see the production unit should reach out to streams la office .big improvement also there is a 2d to 2d option if you want to use it like a regular tv

Are you involved in the development of this stuff?
post #28 of 42
I have one eye that is stronger then the other. As a result I cannot see 3D as it exists today. I am wondering if this technology will allow me to see 3D?
post #29 of 42
You can close one eye and still see 3d. This is more like hologram

The stereoscopic to glasses free 3d conversion is incredible.
post #30 of 42
Yes, I founded the company
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