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Sound City Studio Documentary

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I just watched this with my son. It was Illuminating. The movie chronicles the life of the Los Angeles studio that gave us so much of our recorded audio history. From Fleetwood Mac, Tom Petty, and Rick Springfield to Nirvana and Nine Inch Nails and a host of others too long to list. But it's relevance isn't restricted to the Rock/Punk scene. It asks questions that should be asked when something that has a serious impact on any art form comes on the scene. It uses, of all things, a Nive mixing board and two inch tape as a focus to shed light on the pitfalls of the direction that has been taken regarding the exclusive reliance on digital technology over a heart felt love of the music. I see it as potentially pivotal in the direction the future of recorded audio will take and I dearly hope the message is heard and taken to heart.

We caught it on VH1.

It should be seen.
post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildoak View Post

I just watched this with my son. It was Illuminating. The movie chronicles the life of the Los Angeles studio that gave us so much of our recorded audio history. From Fleetwood Mac, Tom Petty, and Rick Springfield to Nirvana and Nine Inch Nails and a host of others too long to list. But it's relevance isn't restricted to the Rock/Punk scene. It asks questions that should be asked when something that has a serious impact on any art form comes on the scene. It uses, of all things, a Nive mixing board and two inch tape as a focus to shed light on the pitfalls of the direction that has been taken regarding the exclusive reliance on digital technology over a heart felt love of the music. I see it as potentially pivotal in the direction the future of recorded audio will take and I dearly hope the message is heard and taken to heart.

We caught it on VH1.

It should be seen.

Sounds like just more analog uber alles propaganda. Really good analog consoles and tape recorders are almost as good sounding as digital if accuracy is your standard, but digital can be smaller, cheaper and easier to use. We're talking a 20:1 improvement and more. Analog has not only far greater acquisition costs, but also costs more to keep running in top condition.

Most creative artists don't care that much about technology, they just want what they want and digital makes that far easier and cheaper.

Common sense says that anything that is easier to use is more likely to produce good artistic results because it improves the immediacy of the creative experience. However, something that is easier to use and cheaper will also lead to the creation of more work that is casual and poorly formed, as well as being the product of lesser skills. IOW, crappy. Technology is always a two edged sword.
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arnyk View Post

Common sense says that anything that is easier to use is more likely to produce good artistic results because it improves the immediacy of the creative experience. However, something that is easier to use and cheaper will also lead to the creation of more work that is casual and poorly formed, as well as being the product of lesser skills. IOW, crappy. Technology is always a two edged sword.

The general jist of the film was that the observed result result was far too heavily weighted to the latter. The point was made, however that the new Tech ,ProTools and the like were valuable in the right hands. If seen as another arrow in the quiver the Tech COULD be an advancement. All too often it's just a means to compensate for a lack of real talent or just sheer laziness - no need to "get it right, we'll just fix it in the box".
post #4 of 7
I second Wildoak's recommendation. Anyone that enjoys music, especially rock/punk rock, and audio gear is sure to enjoy this film. As evidenced by his ill-informed comments, Arny clearly has never seen the film. It is not an analog vs digital debate. It is a film about a musician that saves a piece of audio gear (NEVE mixing console) and how that single mixing board touched many musicians lives. I enjoyed the film and I listen to primarily red book CD. For those interested, it is playing on the Palladia network on satellite/cable. smile.gif
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audiophil View Post

For those interested, it is playing on the Palladia network on satellite/cable. smile.gif

thanks for the heads up--looks like it's airing one more time this morning so I'll record it.
post #6 of 7
Saw it a while ago and would definitely see it again.
post #7 of 7
Just watched it - great flick and great music! (Had to google it to see that there was a post in this sub-forum. Wouldn't have thought to look here... )
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