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Settle an argument - do bigger HDTVs have more pixels?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
A guy I work with is convinced that bigger TVs have more pixels...I think he's full of crap but a google search resulted in positions on both sides. Can someone point me to a trustworthy web page I can print out to prove my point?

Thanks
post #2 of 17
A 1080p TV screen has 1920x1080, or 2,073,600 pixels. It doesn't matter how big the screen is. Bigger screens have bigger pixels and/or more space between pixels.

If the screen had more than 2,073,600 pixels, it would be higher resolution than 1080p, such as the new 4k screens coming out.

I don't have a webpage for you to print out. It's just simple math.
post #3 of 17
The resolution of the display dictates how many pixels it has - not the size.

You can have a 50" Plasma with 1280x720 resolution - which would be 921,600 pixels.
You can have a 22" LCD with 1920x1080 resolution - which would be 2,073,600 pixels.

So you can't make a "big screen = more pixels" statement. In many cases "bigger screen = bigger pixels" is more likely to be true.

In general most TV screens these days are either 1366x768 or 1920x1080 (with a few 1280x720 and 1024x720 non-square pixels - particularly with plasmas) and recently some 4k 3840x2160 models creeping in at the high end. (There are some other formats - 1920x1200 for instance - but these are more monitors than TVs usually)
post #4 of 17
For the most part there are two flavors of TV sets, 1920 X 1080 and 1280 X 720. Both come in many screen sizes. You have to check the specs for each model of interest to see what the claimed resolution is (many descript cards will say 720 or 1080 to describe the TV).

There is a new kid on the block and its called UHDTV (Ultra-HDTV) with 3840 x 2160 pixels.
post #5 of 17
And the display or delivery (e.g. broadcast) resolution differs from the visual resolution--the finest detail you can see. With a 1080p display (1920X1080 pixels) you might actually be seeing only about 720p visual or effective resolution while watching a movie. With a true 1080p display you should be able to read 1920 alternating B&W pixels or vertical lines across the screen and 1080 pixels or lines stacked vertically using a non-sampled test pattern. But digitally sampled images (not oversampled), filtered for playback, are generally less than the format resolution. Some links on these topics are here , although some URLs, like the lst table reference, have changed. -- John
Edited by John Mason - 12/17/13 at 8:18am
post #6 of 17
You are both correct!!

When you mention pixels that is for a given area, so the larger the screen the more pixels.
But as far as picture quality goes there is no difference.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCbridge View Post

You are both correct!!

When you mention pixels that is for a given area, so the larger the screen the more pixels.

You're kidding, right?
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCbridge View Post

When you mention pixels that is for a given area, so the larger the screen the more pixels.

Folks may want to look at this Dot Pitch chart. For HDTV: look at the 16 x 9 sections and you will note the pixel count remains constant (.92 for 720 and 2.1 for 1080) for various screen sizes.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCbridge View Post

You are both correct!!

When you mention pixels that is for a given area, so the larger the screen the more pixels.
But as far as picture quality goes there is no difference.

What? A 24" screen at 1920x1080 will yield the same number of pixels as a screen with a much larger area, such as a 60", which will also have 1920x1080. The only major difference is the size of those pixels.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by NVboy View Post

What? A 24" screen at 1920x1080 will yield the same number of pixels as a screen with a much larger area, such as a 60", which will also have 1920x1080. The only major difference is the size of those pixels.

+1

That is the correct answer for any digital display (LCD, plasma, LCoS, DLP, OLED). The dot pitch will tell you how big those pixels are.

Effective resolution (what your eye can actually see at some distance) is a completely different subject.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell R. Breland View Post

For the most part there are two flavors of TV sets, 1920 X 1080 and 1280 X 720. Both come in many screen sizes. You have to check the specs for each model of interest to see what the claimed resolution is (many descript cards will say 720 or 1080 to describe the TV).
Whilst 1920x1080 and 1280x720 are the two main broadcast formats for HD (and production formats) - there are relatively few 1280x720 native resolution display panels in TVs these days.

1366x768 appears to be a far more common panel resolution - particularly in LCD displays. A lot of sets labelled "720p" in stores are actually using 768p panels - with the "720p" label used to differentiate them from Full HD 1920x1080 native panels.

But as others have stated - and I think we both agree - the number of pixels in a 22" and 85" display with the same panel resolution is the same!
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCbridge View Post

You are both correct!!

When you mention pixels that is for a given area, so the larger the screen the more pixels.
But as far as picture quality goes there is no difference.

Nope. A 22" 1920x1080 panel has the same number of pixels as a 103" 1920x1080 panel... The individual pixels get bigger, but the number of pixels stays the same...
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
I agree...I just need something I can my coworker who usually right about a lot of things. This is my chance to finally prove him wrong on something.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sneals2000 View Post

1366x768 appears to be a far more common panel resolution - particularly in LCD displays.

Purely a guess, but that may be because it is easier, cheaper, better results, etc. to scale 1920 to 1366 than 1280.
post #15 of 17
The image below is for a JVC 1.27 inch D-ILA panel (one of three) that is used in one of their commercial video projectors. It has 8,192 x 4,320 pixels.

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roscoe View Post

I agree...I just need something I can my coworker who usually right about a lot of things. This is my chance to finally prove him wrong on something.

In the early days of flat-panel HDTVs it wasn't unusual for smaller TVs to be more commonly sold with lower resolutions, with higher resolutions panels more popular for larger displays. (i.e. 1920x1080 panels smaller than 32" weren't that common, and many 40" or larger displays were often 1920x1080. However there were higher resolution small screens, and there were lower resolution larger screens (particularly plasmas) - it was never really a case that the bigger the screen, the higher the resolution and thus the more pixels)
post #17 of 17
Unfortunately, industry tech standards on this subject appear to be copywrited and non-quotable. However, you might run this website by him - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-definition_television
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