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Vizio setting

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I just bought a 60in Vizio Model No M601d-A3 and was wondering how i should go about getting all the setting all set up so that i Have the best picture possible. Can anyone help me please?
post #2 of 8
I would suggest getting the free AVS HD709 disk (use the Search feature to find it on AVS), burn it (however, you need a blu-ray player to use it) or purchase a commercial disk like the 2nd Edition Spears & Munsil and adjust your own basic settings (contrast, brightness, sharpness, aspect, and color). Keep in mind that if you use someone else's settings they may not look good to you on your set because your component tolerances are different (even if you have the exact same model) as well as your viewing environment.
post #3 of 8
I say get the Disney WOW! disc. It works great for calibrations and is great for non advanced users.
post #4 of 8
The Disney WOW disk is another good commercial disk that will work as well for adjusting your picture settings. However, it won't calibrate your tv because for that you need meters and specialized software.
post #5 of 8
I disagree. The wow disc is a calibration disc. Its not just a settings disc. Yes its not a professional calibration with a special program that uses a tool instead of your own eyes but it can do almost as good as a job. Pro calibrations are always a hit or miss. They can look good or I've seen make things look worse for people. Discs if used right can give great results.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by beetlejuice247 View Post

I disagree. The wow disc is a calibration disc. Its not just a settings disc. Yes its not a professional calibration with a special program that uses a tool instead of your own eyes but it can do almost as good as a job. Pro calibrations are always a hit or miss. They can look good or I've seen make things look worse for people. Discs if used right can give great results.

To be clear, I agree that you can get very nice looking pq using a cal disk to accurately adjust your picture settings but your tv is not calibrated in any sense of the word because you are using your eyes, and not light meters, to adjust the settings to rec.709 standards, and there are some parameters that can only be adjusted with a light meter. An experienced, professional calibrator (check references) will be able to calibrate your tv to the rec.709 standards depending on what level of control your tv has. A lot of people don't like a truly calibrated picture because that is not what they are used to seeing (it takes time for the eye and brain to adjust) and source material, source, etc can vary drastically at times which will affect perceived pq. Disk are, however, a very cheap and inexpensive way to get your pq usually better than default settings and are an excellent way to learn the basics of how the various parameters work together to produce a pleasing pq. But, to get back OT, sharing settings can create more issues than not, so one should at least use a disk to adjust the settings.
post #7 of 8
As a starting point, here are the calibration settings (he used equipment) from Ursa99:

"A3" series panels (60", 70", 80") Calibration Settings (From Ursa99) - Updated as per post #2556



Picture Mode: Game
Backlight: 55 (was 73)
Brightness: 57 (was 48)
Contrast: 53 (was 60)
Color: 40 (was 38)
Tint: 0
Sharpness: 50

Color temperature: Normal
Red Gain: 148 (was 158)
Green Gain: 117 (was 116)
Blue gain: 130 (was 127)
Red offset: 131 (was 135)
Green offset: 129 (was 134)
Blue offset: 128 (was 137)

Auto Brightness Control: Off
Black Detail: Off
Smart Dimming: Off (was on)
Smooth Motion Effect: Off
Reduce Signal Noise: Off
Reduce Block Noise: Off
Film Mode: Auto

He suggests trying his RGB settings (under color temperature) and then adjusting the other values to suit you.
post #8 of 8
Again, using another's settings may not work well at all because of component tolerance differences and your viewing environment. However, if you understand that, and don't freak out if your tv looks worse, and you think you have a bad tv, that's fine as a starting point. I've seen people post back worrying that they've screwed up their tv, or something is wrong with their tv because a "killer" set of cal settings looks like crap on their set. I've even seen folks get into the service menu to "correct" the settings and really mess things up. OTOH, I've seen people use someone else's settings and be totally happy with them. So a little knowledge of what is happening can go a long way in eliminating unnecessary stress. And it doesn't matter at all if the borrowed settings were done with meters or not because the underlying principle is still the same. No two tv's are exactly the same, even within the same model line or build sequence, so calibrating is setting your components to match rec.709 standards in your viewing environment. Quite often, just properly using a disk is all that some need to achieve what they feel looks great to them.
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