or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › DIY Speakers and Subs › Large Ported Dayton HO18's
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Large Ported Dayton HO18's - Page 11

post #301 of 999
Thread Starter 
Ok, so I am confused, does the assembly like I detailed in my last post, stand correct? I am so confused with all of the bracing instructions! This has turned out to be a nightmare of complication for me! I don't understand if the sides rest on top of the bottom, with the top resting on the sides, and then the rear resting on top of the bottom with the top resting on the rear panel and the rear panel rest in between the sides?? I am sooo lost!
post #302 of 999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martycool007 View Post

Ok, so I am confused, does the assembly like I detailed in my last post, stand correct? I am so confused with all of the bracing instructions! This has turned out to be a nightmare of complication for me! I don't understand if the sides rest on top of the bottom, with the top resting on the sides, and then the rear resting on top of the bottom with the top resting on the rear panel and the rear panel rest in between the sides?? I am sooo lost!

lol, keep it simple... both sides will rest on the top of the bottom panel. same with back... the baffle will too but TECHNICALLY it's sandwiched between the top and slot port (but the slot port is just a buffer between the bottom and baffle)

the bracing is all just basic ideas on HOW to brace the thing. you can do waffle cutouts, window braces like mine, or even dowel bracing.. that is kind of a "whatever you want really" scenario. one step at a time
post #303 of 999
"Ok, so I am confused..."

sorry if i confused you.

there are two plans in post #18. the original as we discussed and a simplified version. forget the simplified version as it seems to be confusing things. :-)


so, to answer your question:


since you have the panels, you can just dry fit it to see how it goes together.

"The sides rest on top the bottom, then the top rest on top the sides."

check!

"The rear panel rest on top the bottom panel with the top panel rest on top the rear panel, and the rear panel fits in between the sides, right?"

check!

"Then the front baffle rest inbetween the sides, with the top panel resting on top of the front baffle"

check!

"and the front baffle rest on top the bottom panel."

almost. the front baffle rests on top of the slot panel. the slot panel sits on top of the slot braces. the slot braces sit on top of the bottom panel, but i'm sure that is what you meant.
post #304 of 999
Sorry to hear about the rain damage, Marty. Everything is easier the second time around, though...tongue.gif
post #305 of 999
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies! Yes, the rain came down, unexpectedly, and ruined my original enclosure as I was away at work when it happened. That is ok, though, because I still have 6 unused MDF 2' by 4' handy panels. I will cut one of them in-two and use the other for the bracing.

With regards to assembly, I have the basic idea down now, thanks to LTD02 & Wormraper, many thanks guys! Much appreciated! When starting the assembly process, I plan to start with the bottom panel, and add the slot panel, glue the left side on first, then after that dries, I will then install the rear panel, then install the right side, then the front baffle, than last the top panel.

My question is how do I make sure the first side panel, (that being the left panel), is straight and not leaning in or out? Any other assembly tips would definitely be welcomed!
post #306 of 999
If it were me I think I would build the vent first on the bottom panel and then go from there. I would also make sure the vent correlates with your side panels, back and baffle first before I glued and screwed or glued. Then you could go from there. I like to go a little extra on the panels that make since sense so you can flush trim after it’s together for a nice flush fit. It’s very hard to do it any other way.
post #307 of 999
Marty, there are numerous jigs for keeping panels at 90 degrees while the glue dries. They just clamp to both panels. You can make your own. I use these.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0036B0WNK/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
post #308 of 999
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickD1225 View Post

Marty, there are numerous jigs for keeping panels at 90 degrees while the glue dries. They just clamp to both panels. You can make your own. I use these.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0036B0WNK/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


Thanks for the link Rick! I did not think to use some corner clamps! I may pick up some of the corner clamps from Sears later on today while I am in town. Thanks for that idea!
post #309 of 999
Finally some progress again. I was down with the flu for most of the week. I should be finished tomorrow. biggrin.gif Today I glued in the grille spacers and hot glued a small washer onto the spacers (edit: epic fail, I need to PL a 2nd set of magnets). I also PL'ed magnets into the grill after I painted it black. Duratex was applied onto the back and the speaker baffle.

Tomorrow I will finish applying Duratex to the rest of the enclosure and will glue and stretch spandex over the grille. Then, magically, the sub will find a home in the basement... cool.gif






Edit 9/28/13 - Hot glue didn't work and washer/magnet combo was not strong enough.
Edited by mhutchins - 9/28/13 at 3:08pm
post #310 of 999
i was wondering given the jack rabbit's pace with which you began. you do nice work. roundovers on the ports...nice touch.
post #311 of 999
Thanks! It's so easy with the router and I really like the look. I also put a small bevel around the outer perimeter of the front of the enclosure. This will be complimented by a larger bevel on the grille, which stands proud of the enclosure by ~1/2". I can't wait for tomorrow, when I finish this monster and I can take the last few pictures to showcase this build!

Kudos to you LTD and your design efforts to make this LLT sub within easy reach of just about anyone. It's about as close as you can come to a CNC'ed flat pack without the CNC costs and shipping expense!

Mike
post #312 of 999
Cue intro to 2001: A Space Oddyssey

























Edited by mhutchins - 9/28/13 at 3:04pm
post #313 of 999
Time to shut down the project for now, it's raining too hard. The only thing left to do is glue in a set of magnets in place of the washers on the standoffs. Hot glue does not adequately bond to metal and the magnetic attraction was not strong enough to securely hold the grille. Good thing I bought 8 to begin with, for just this scenario!

So, I had my head up my . . .subwoofer, and I noticed a strong resonance around 80Hz +/-. I'm wondering, is this something I need to try and damp out, or is it just the Helmholtz resonant frequency for this volume. Depending on the correction applied for the neck of the cavity, I get Helmholtz values from 60-175Hz.

Lastly, a few progress pics:

Making the Grille - I used leftover spandex from when I made my screen




A few detail pics





And the final result




Once I get a decent break between thunderstorms, I'll mount the woof and see if my tuning frequency changed perceptibly with the memory foam lining. For transport to the man cave, I'll take the driver back out and carry that separately downstairs. This beast is heavy enough without the driver!

Mike
post #314 of 999
Wow that looks like a 5000oo dollar sub. biggrin.gif nice work.
post #315 of 999
Thanks, man!
post #316 of 999
your attention to detail and the attendant results are amazing!

with respect to the 80hz resonance, the first port resonance should be almost double that and will be completely out of the pass band. that leaves only internal cabinet reflections/modes and something else... given that it is about 3.5 feet deep and that would be 1/4 wavelength at about 80hz, by not having the driver mounted the unit is behaving as something of a resonant pipe. that should go away when the driver is mounted. interesting "heads-up" observation.

the monolith is interesting. conceived by non-humans <-? and sent to earth the purpose of which remains a mystery. :-)

from the wiki on the monolith:

"While it is unclear what the composition of the monoliths is, they clearly have mass, which is about the only observation that can be made."

i would go further and suggest that it makes strange sounds the purpose of which isn't wholly understood either. :-)
post #317 of 999
Thank you, sir, for the compliment!

With all his wisdom and intergalactic travels, I would have thought the Silver Surfer would know what the monoliths were all about! And yes, this monolith definitely has mass eek.gif
post #318 of 999
Now I just have to move the beast, er, monolith.

Tuning Update: 14 Hz

Before, without the memory foam lining, the tuning frequency was 14-15 Hz. Now, with a full foam lining, it is a definite 14 Hz. Both 13 Hz and 15 Hz had significantly more cone excursion, whereas 14 Hz was 90% less. Recall, my 3 ports are 2"x7"x36" with a 2" diameter roundover internally and 1/2" roundover externally.

Bottom line: a 1.5" memory foam lining lowered the tuning from ~14.5 Hz down to 14 Hz.





Edit : Corrected port dimensions (Thanks LTD for noticing)
Edited by mhutchins - 10/1/13 at 7:15am
post #319 of 999
^^^ Seems like a shame to put a grill on the monolith! cool.gif
post #320 of 999
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhutchins View Post

Now I just have to move the beast, er, monolith.

Tuning Update: 14 Hz

Before, without the memory foam lining, the tuning frequency was 14-15 Hz. Now, with a full foam lining, it is a definite 14 Hz. Both 13 Hz and 15 Hz had significantly more cone excursion, whereas 14 Hz was 90% less. Recall, my 3 ports are 2"x14"x36" with a 2" diameter roundover internally and 1/2" roundover externally.

Bottom line: a 1.5" memory foam lining lowered the tuning from ~14.5 Hz down to 14 Hz.




and how did that affect your power efficiency?
post #321 of 999
I don't have any measurement gear...and I didn't do a before measurement. I'll see how my Hafler holds up with music and movies.
post #322 of 999
Thread Starter 




post #323 of 999
Thread Starter 
Aww crap, just realized a huge mistake on my part. On the rear panel I cut 3/4" off the bottom, but forgot to take the full 1.5" only did 3/4", and it is already glued and tacked in with 2" brad nails.

Should I just cut a wider top piece from a 4' by 8' sheet of MDF and use that panel to cover the entire top of the box? If I did that. It would simply be like a full size top cover, one that covers both the sides, and the front and rear panels. Not sure how this would affect tuning? I made the port 3" tall by 24" wide, by 32".

Making it harder is the fact that my local Home Depot does not have any 2' by 2' panels, plus the 2' by 4' panels are 24 & 1/8 by 48.

Can I salvage this enclosure? I can pick up another 4' by 8' sheet of MDF for the top. Also, I can use a jig saw or saw zaw to shorten the port, if needed!
post #324 of 999
For me to understand just what your saying, I would need to see some pics of the problem at hand Marty..
post #325 of 999
What about securing a guide to the panel and use a circular saw to cut off a 3/4" strip off the top?
post #326 of 999
I feel for you guys without a shop eek.gif. here's a pic of my main area


If you were in my area I would definitely let you drop in. I ordered the inuke 3000dsp from ebay for $279 new.
Wednesday I will cut out most of the pieces and assemble. I like the window braces that Mike used and I think I will use them.
I will take lots of pics.:
post #327 of 999
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhutchins View Post

What about securing a guide to the panel and use a circular saw to cut off a 3/4" strip off the top?

That might work, but I think that I will just buy another sheet of MDF, and rip a 48" by 26" section to use as the top.

Another thing that is hard for me to grasp, is how to attach the Jasper Jig to my router? My router has a collet for a 1/2 bit, and I have read the instructions but still don't understand how to mount & use the Jasper Jig??
post #328 of 999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martycool007 View Post

That might work, but I think that I will just buy another sheet of MDF, and rip a 48" by 26" section to use as the top.

Another thing that is hard for me to grasp, is how to attach the Jasper Jig to my router? My router has a collet for a 1/2 bit, and I have read the instructions but still don't understand how to mount & use the Jasper Jig??

I took a picture of my router which has a plate on top for a router table. The jasper Jig works the same in that it gets attached with screw with threaded nut to the base of the router


Here is another pic


If you want to make your own jig in under ten minutes here is a good one. I'm going to make it tomorrow.
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip102000sn.html
Edited by chalugadp - 9/30/13 at 2:46pm
post #329 of 999
Thread Starter 
I know that the jig attached with screws, but I can figure out how to align and attach it to my particular router, which is a Craftsman. The alignment thing in the middle of the jig is for a 1/4" but, and my router has a 1/2" collet.

Also, which setting do I put the guide pin in? I know that the overall diametor is 16.7, but what does that equate to on the Jasper Jig?
post #330 of 999
First, Is your router shown In the compatibility list. If not follow the link on the bottom for some suggestions.
http://www.jaspertools.com/circle-guide-compatibility-table.cfm
Your Craftsman should have came with 1/4" & 1/2" collets, If not you may need a stepped dowel to align as they suggest, but In a pinch I bet you could do without using the dowel.
Or use a 1/2" dia. shank 1/4" dia. cutter In place of the dowel as a pilot. to align the jig.
I'd use the 16 3/4" + clearance for paint/Duratex maybe 1/8" If using a 1/4" dia. cutter. Measure twice.. or make a test circle on scrap to get your desired fit.

edited for cutter dia. disclaimer.
Edited by Hindikush - 9/30/13 at 4:02pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: DIY Speakers and Subs
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › DIY Speakers and Subs › Large Ported Dayton HO18's