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Ray Dolby passes away

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Just saw this about Ray Dolby passing away and suppose this is the most appropriate space http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Ray-Dolby-pioneering-sound-engineer-dies-at-80-4810882.php

RIP
post #2 of 5
At least he got to see Atmos as a company achievement before he passed away. I mean, how are you going to top an Atmos sound system?
post #3 of 5
Sorry to learn of this, he'd been ill for some time.

What a true giant in the industry. I remember looking at the double D, Dolby B noise reduction symbol on my Alpine AM/FM cassette deck in the late 70s, thinking damn, ... that dude must be loaded. Then, over time I eventually learned more about his engineering chops and all he supplied to the audio industry.
post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadyJ View Post

At least he got to see Atmos as a company achievement before he passed away. I mean, how are you going to top an Atmos sound system?

Actually probably not (at least comprehend). I believe he had beed suffering from Alzheimer's.
post #5 of 5
Ray Dolby, while a college student working part time at Ampex, also made significant contributions to the FM recording method for the first VTR in 1956. The idea of using FM to compress very wide bandwidth signals like video and radar is still used extensively today in data recording. Your disk drives all use this technology.

Specifically he did not come up with the FM recording idea but did introduce the multivibrator type modulator which could produce the FM carrier directly from the video signal thus greatly simplifying the video signal system. Current technology at the time required deviating a 50mhz+ crystal oscillator (needed high frequencies because crystal oscillators have a very narrow deviation range) then hetrodyning it down to the 5-10mhz range to record on tape - all with vacuum tubes! Ray's multivibrator circuit could do it with one dual triode tube (or two transistors in later years).

Note: The LA Times today credited Ray Dolby as the chief design engineer for the VTR at Ampex. That is incorrect. The head of the team was Charles Ginsburg. Nonetheless, Ray played a very significant part in the team.

And you thought he was an audio guy! smile.gif

Ray is fourth from the left. Note that's just the tape transport. The all vacuum tube VTR electronics took up two full racks. When color was added that took two more racks!


Edited by Glimmie - 9/13/13 at 11:48am
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