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Speaker Damage from Recordings

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Is it possible to damage a speaker or tweeter from a crack or hiss in a recording? I watch a lot of sports and often times after a big play, the crowd noise causes an audio spike and sounds nasty coming through the speakers - highly distorted.
post #2 of 9
you'd have to have the volume up really loud for that to happen.

I'm not quite sure what watching sports on TV has to do with a recording though.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Just referring to the fact that it is a recorded sound distortion. Thanks for the reply.
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Riddle View Post

Just referring to the fact that it is a recorded sound distortion.
Almost all electric lead guitar tones are distorted, and all synthesizers are heavily distorted. It's not a problem.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks Bill and afrogt for the replies.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Riddle View Post

I watch a lot of sports and often times after a big play, the crowd noise causes an audio spike and sounds nasty coming through the speakers - highly distorted.
Looking at this again, there is a potential danger here. If the distortion is sourced at the broadcasting end then there's little danger. However, if the source of the distortion is your system, either in the amp clipping when it can't cleanly amplify the signal or the speakers clipping when they can't handle the amp output, or both, then your tweeters could be at risk.
My system has plenty of headroom all around, and I never notice crowd noise sourced distortion. If you hear that distortion regularly with a particular event see if it goes away if you turn the volume down. If it does then the distortion is coming from your system, so either the amp or speakers or both are undersized for the volume you're listening at. If the distortion is still present at low volume then the broadcast is the source and you should be OK.
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks Bill. I checked yesterday and it was definitely the source. I've never run into any true clipping situations with my amp (onkyo tx-nr808) and I have the Klipsch RF-62 II system which is very efficient. It only happens on certain broadcasts where it goes from extremely quiet to loud all at once and I'm guessing tests the mics being used. I switched it over to the television speakers and it happened there too at lower volumes. Football typically isn't an offender, usually golf.
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Riddle View Post

Football typically isn't an offender, usually golf.
That's not necessarily distortion per se, it's often comb filtering, caused by having multiple mics at different positions around the course. And of course the obligatory idiot yelling "In the hole!" when someone hits a drive that couldn't possibly reach the green by 200 yards. mad.gif
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Lol, that and any other phrase from Happy Gilmore. I've never heard of comb filtering before - just did some reading on it and sounds interesting. I do know it sounds particularly nasty coming through my speakers.
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