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LG Unveils Two New UHDTVs at CEDIA 2013

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

LG does not have a booth on the show floor of CEDIA, but as in years past, the company hosted a press reception off site. On display at this year's soiree was the 55EA9800 1080p, curved OLED TV ($10,000) along with the 84LM9600 ($17,000), 65LA9700 ($6500), and 55LA9700 ($4500) UHDTVs, all currently available at Magnolia outlets within some Best Buy stores and soon to be sold at other retailers. Also on hand were two new models of UHDTV—the 65LA9650 ($5000) and 55LA9650 ($3500).

 

Photo by Mark Henninger

 

Why are the new sets less expensive than the LA9700s? Because the LA9650s are LED-edge-lit rather than using full-array backlighting with local dimming. Even so, LG claims they provide "local dimming" with 12 zones, which I find hard to accept, just like any other edge-lit LCD TV that purports to offer any sort of local dimming.

 

One interesting feature of the new sets is the implementation of H.265 decoding—LG claims these are the first TVs to have it built in. Even more interesting was the rep's assertion that, if UHD ends up using HEVC (high-efficiency video coding, another name for H.265), these sets will be ready for it. Aye, there's the rub—it's not yet known if this will be the codec for UHD, so implementing it seems a bit premature.

 

As is LG's wont, the new sets will provide passive 3D (in my opinion, much better than active glasses, especially with UHDTVs), smart TV functionality, and LG's Magic Motion remote with gesture and voice recognition. LG is particularly proud of its upscaling engine, which had better work well since the vast majority of content played on these sets will be 1080p, at least for a while.

 

The LA9650 UHDTVs will be available in October, just in time for the holiday buying season. And who knows—maybe the lower prices will induce more people to jump onto the leading edge of the UHD curve.

 

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post #2 of 19

Scott, thanks to you and Mark for the great work.  You have added much value to this forum.

 

Sorry to say I don't think LG has any full array back lit panels.   Are you sure the LA9700 is a full array locally dimmed panel?  I've never hear this before and the panel is quite thin to be populated with front facing LED bulbs.

 

Can you re-check and let us know.   Thanks,  Stap

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stapelton View Post
 

Scott, thanks to you and Mark for the great work.  You have added much value to this forum.

 

Sorry to say I don't think LG has any full array back lit panels.   Are you sure the LA9700 is a full array locally dimmed panel?  I've never hear this before and the panel is quite thin to be populated with front facing LED bulbs.

 

Can you re-check and let us know.   Thanks,  Stap

 

Thanks for the kind words! That's what the LG rep said this evening, very clearly and unequivocally.

post #4 of 19

Thanks Scott.  Do you think it's true?  I've never heard this before and with the outside width of just 1.61" thick I don't think LED lamps will fit facing forward.

 

Honestly, I'm not sure, but I do doubt it's a full array locally dimmed panel.

post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stapelton View Post

Thanks Scott.  Do you think it's true?  I've never heard this before and with the outside width of just 1.61" thick I don't think LED lamps will fit facing forward.

Honestly, I'm not sure, but I do doubt it's a full array locally dimmed panel.

The LA9700 is definitely full-array with local dimming, termed "Nano LED" by LG. They made a big deal about it during press releases when it was first announced.

Here's the spec page: under BLU type it lists NANO Full LED:

http://www.lg.com/us/tvs/lg-65LA9700-led-tv
post #6 of 19

Thanks and as I said this is just my guess, but I'm still not convinced.   The link you provided just says "NANO Full LED".  Does that mean "full array locally dimmed back-lie LED"? 

 

We've all seen manufacturers use terms relating to the LED being back lit and or have local dimming when the panels are actually edge lit.

 

Hope no one minds my questions on this.  I'm not trying to argue and I'm truly not sure. 

post #7 of 19

Just checked the depth of LG's LA9700 against Samsung's same size F9000 edge lit UHD TV and they are exactly the same 1.6" deep. 

 

Maybe LG found a way to populate LED bulbs through the panel without increasing the panel depth and also keep the costs low?

post #8 of 19
No problem with your doubt; manufacturers can pull some pretty tricky stuff. But LG has been using the NANO branding for their full-array sets for the last few years. "LED Plus" backlighting is the name reserved for Edge-lit with local dimming sets. Here's a CNET article from the release of the LA9700:
Quote:
"The Micro Pixel Control has hundreds of blocks of LEDs throughout the back of the panel that can individually brighten and dim, which enables the deepest, darkest, and most natural colors for superior picture performance." The company uses Nano branding to differentiate its full-array local dimming from lesser edge-lit varieties, like the LED Plus touted for the step-down LA8600 series, including the 84-inch 4K set.

http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-tvs/lg-65la9700/4505-6482_7-35822956.html

Just because a TV is thin doesn't mean it can't be full-array. The Sony HX950 was only 1 7/8" deep.
post #9 of 19

Thanks again and I am sorry that I doubted this spec.  I am surprised LG would not take advantage of using the commonly and in fact, only accepted explanation of what LG Nano LED actually is.  It seems to me this is a very important feature and benefit and LG's big box and small retailers would never know it's a full array locally dimmed panel.  IN my way of thinking it's okay to call it Nano LED, but the spec sheet should further explain that LG's exclusive Nano LED technology is full array with local dimming.

 

If I was LG product or marking manager I'd be boasting about how we developed the LED technology and we're the only company who could fit the LEDs in a ultra slim chassis that is no thicker than the world's slimmest inferior edge lit TV.  

 

Thanks for taking the time to support this is a full array locally dimmed panel.

post #10 of 19
Has there been anymore talk about 4K media being available? I haven't heard anything in awhile and I figured by now we would hear of a new physical media for the UHD panels as well as other means of delivery.
post #11 of 19
The 4K LG XXLA9700 is a FALD, has a IPS panel though.

LG previous FALDs also had an IPS panel, were mediocre performers wink.gif
1080p XXLM9600
1080p XXLW9800
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post

The 4K LG XXLA9700 is a FALD, has a IPS panel though.

LG previous FALDs also had an IPS panel, were mediocre performers wink.gif
1080p XXLM9600
1080p XXLW9800


So the only confirmed 4K FALD panels are the:
LG 55" 55LA9700 IPS
LG 65" 65LA9700 IPS
Samsung 85" 85S9

Come on Sharp. Where is our new Elite 80" 4K FALD NON-IPS with MothEye?
post #13 of 19
No word on physical media. Then again, I saw some amazing-looking 4K demos coming off both Red-Ray and Sony's servers. Good enough to declare that people who say they can't see the difference are either in need of glasses, have never experienced what they are discussing, or trolling. Also, native 4K content is quite obviously better than upscaled 1080p.
Quote:
Originally Posted by comfynumb View Post

Has there been anymore talk about 4K media being available? I haven't heard anything in awhile and I figured by now we would hear of a new physical media for the UHD panels as well as other means of delivery.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

No word on physical media. Then again, I saw some amazing-looking 4K demos coming off both Red-Ray and Sony's servers. Good enough to declare that people who say they can't see the difference are either in need of glasses, have never experienced what they are discussing, or trolling. Also, native 4K content is quite obviously better than upscaled 1080p.



I'm surprised there wasn't an announcement about physical 4K media yet, but I do understand it will take some time, if it happens at all.
post #15 of 19
For 4K for what I'd want it for - I think 84" is too big, 65" is too small, and 55" is ridiculous to even consider for a 4K panel (IMO).
Hey! - where's my 75" 4K plasma?! smile.gif

Seriously, ALL of these are LCD/LED sets, and not even with full array backlighting?
For the price, that's taking a one way trip to 'deal-breaker city!' in my mind,...rolleyes.gif
post #16 of 19
Plasma's on its way out if you haven't noticed. OLED is our only hope (Obi-Wan Kenobi).
post #17 of 19
why they got rid of crt i will never no, nothing comes close to it, why did they not just produce HD CRT screens i will never no, surely they could have made the crt tech smaller.
post #18 of 19
This LightBoost tech works great with NVidia cards and gaming, maybe it will come to TVs sometime? http://www.blurbusters.com/ Basically makes 120/144hz LCDs with NVidia's LightBoost look as good as CRT, for motion blurs anyway not blacks which I suppose is what you're talking about....

Still a novel invention though. The trick is to basically set the monitor into 3d mode while showing a 2d picture. LightBoost strobes the monitor to try to make it brighter with 3d glasses on, but without glasses and showing a 2d pic it's awesome for cutting down motion blur. It does mess with the colors a tiny bit, sort of an unintended feature that surely will be improved on now that it's taking off a bit.
post #19 of 19
LG's 4K panels will provide the same black levels as standard 1080p panels available today, what does this mean?...For the most part a large display will look horrible in terms of contrast and black levels...just on a bigger scale.

* I feel Local dimming technology for LED sets is poorly implemented, simply because it's too expensive to do it right> The nano tech LG talks about is the Basic DNA that made the KURO achieve excellent black levels and was also implemented into the Sharp Elite Panel.

Basically in order to provide efficient black levels> light output from behind each pixel needs to be focused like a laser so it does not disperse prematurely when it arrives at the pixel structure> if it does...light will leak out the edges of the pixel thus reducing observable black levels.

To make a panel that does this properly requires strict tolerances> which most Panel makers fail to achieve.

I'm excited to see LG release 4K panels> but they're still based on excessive back-light dimming technology that's poorly implemented.

LG seems to be a brand based on a market that thrives on impulse purchases> and should not be taken too seriously.

* When LG first introduced Nano technology back in 2010, I was ready to purchase their Korean prototype model with full backlit LED and machined chassis for $8,000...eventually the Sharp Elite LED panel was released 3-4 months after and decided to go with that one. wink.gif
Edited by theatredaz - 10/14/13 at 1:48pm
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