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How do i Hook Up my Computer to my TV set?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I have a nice running Pioneer Elite 510 HD tv set, I not too long ago repaired the power supply board (re-soldered all the joints), thanks to info supplied on this forum.

I now have a spare computer and would like to hook it up to the TV so I can view computer content on the TV. My TV has a RGB input, component video inputs (Y, Pe, Pr) , S-video, and Coax video inputs.

The RGB input on the TV looks similar to the video monitor output on one of my older slower computer and my newer computer has a similar connector but with more pins.

Can the older computer be hooked up directly to my TV via the RGB connection?

Ideally I'd like to hook up my newer computer to the TV, is there some converter to allow this to happen?

I'd like to be able to watch free computer content on my TV. I already can watch YouTube videos on my TV via a DVD player, but my DVD player does not support Hulu, which has a lot of good free content. I can watch Hulu free content on my computer, however the small screen at my desk is not the best place or sized monitor that would allow most enjoyment.

any suggestions?
post #2 of 29
Just go with RGB to RGB but you also need to get audio from the PC to the TV. Can you elaborate on the connections for both units for audio?
post #3 of 29
Copied from "Sound & Vision" mag.: The Pioneer PRO-510HD has an internal line doubler for NTSC sources and accepts 480p or 1080i DTV signals from an external tuner through both component and VGA-type D-Sub 15 connectors. There are four audio/ video inputs that offer composite and S-video connectors, in addition to stereo audio jacks.
You get two inputs that accept wideband component signals, but you'll want to think twice about using this TV with a progressive-scan DVD player. Pioneer follows the pack in that all 480p sources, whether they're DVD or DTV, are viewed in the 1.78, full-screen mode. Nonanamorphic DVDs and 1.33 standard-definition TV signals will appear stretched


So you can connect to your computer's "VGA" port for the picture, but you're going to need a sound card (e.g. outputs on your computer) with RCA style plugs for R and L audio to the TV.
post #4 of 29
The old PC should have a mini audio out port. He could use a mini to RCA cable to get audio to TV, no?
post #5 of 29
Wait, that would put audio and video on different input sources. Is there an audio mini plug port next to VGA input for the computer audio?
post #6 of 29
Before going through all this, one must ask, "Why?"

Now that that's out of the way, there most likely is the 3.5mm audio port on the PC but how to connect that to your TV?
post #7 of 29
The manual I saw for that has the RGB "sharing" input3 so the audio would be connected to input3 and there is a switch that disables the video from video/svid and switched it to the RGB input... the manual I have also states (emphasis mine)"The RGB input jack is designed for use in connecting a digital tuner with RGB signal output, and it should accordingly never be used for connecting to a personal computer or other device" but I think this is just in case the pc sets the range beyond what it is capable but because of the warnings I would probably go VGA to component
post #8 of 29
With a VGA to component adapter?
post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tre74 View Post

The old PC should have a mini audio out port. He could use a mini to RCA cable to get audio to TV, no?
Good point. That would work.
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by signcarver View Post

The RGB input jack is designed for use in connecting a digital tuner with RGB signal output, and it should accordingly never be used for connecting to a personal computer or other device" but I think this is just in case the pc sets the range beyond what it is capable but because of the warnings I would probably go VGA to component

That's too bad.
My Pioneer 5080HD accepts PC input on VGA. So that leaves you with the "Component" cable connection - with the separate audio connection. The "S-Video" is the second best choice with "Video" being the least desirable.
post #11 of 29
I don't know about the RGB thing. But as those about said, your PC probably has a 3.5mm audio jack. Just get a 3.5mm to composite/RCA adapter Get an VGA to component adapter. I think you'll good to go since VGA and component video are both analog.

If you're computer for some reason is sending out a digital video signal, you'll need to get a converter. Unfortunately, these are not cheap. I would suggest getting a used HDFury, such as version 3. It just converters the signal to digial. So you may have to adjust resolution the PC sends out to match something the TV can accept. If possible, you'll want to dual monitor in this situation so you can make adjustments for the TV and still be able to see the PC.

I had to do this when I first setup my HTPC (mac mini) because it had DVI/display port and the TV's only HD input was component; there was a coaxial but it only accepted ATSC. This video is over two years old, but this was that setup.The TV went out and has been replaced with flat screen plasma
post #12 of 29
His TV has a VGA input. Why is everyone still talking about component?
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdavej View Post

His TV has a VGA input. Why is everyone still talking about component?

Maybe because of this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by signcarver View Post

The manual I saw for that has the RGB "sharing" input3 so the audio would be connected to input3 and there is a switch that disables the video from video/svid and switched it to the RGB input... the manual I have also states (emphasis mine)"The RGB input jack is designed for use in connecting a digital tuner with RGB signal output, and it should accordingly never be used for connecting to a personal computer or other device" but I think this is just in case the pc sets the range beyond what it is capable but because of the warnings I would probably go VGA to component

But it is worth a try first anyhow as it could be the simplest way to do it but the range may not match up causing issues if the PC is 0-255 and the TV is 16-235.
post #14 of 29
Thanks for quoting me Sammy2, Rereading what I wrote, I probably should clarify why I stated I would probably use VGA to component (I have several of these cables from old projectors so thinking about using one is "normal" for me)... If it were my TV, I would probably just use a VGA cable and attach the audio to input 3 since it does look to be a standard VGA connector and would have never have thought twice about it but when someone asked about audio I went looking for the manual and found the above quote so I won't advise someone to do what the manual specifically tells someone not to do without knowing more about the capabilities of the TV than what the manual I found mentioned (I have a feeling it wants 640x480 on that input and they put the warning there for possible damage if you had it set higher... I know with linux years ago I used to have to manually configure the rates for above 640x480 and I actually broke a monitor from accepting any input with an improper setting that I mistyped way out of range... usually they don't break and are fine when returned to normal ranges).
Edited by signcarver - 10/14/13 at 6:38pm
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by signcarver View Post

... it wants 640x480 on that input ...

Although Sig is not stating that is the VGA resolution, it does remind me to point out to check what is the resolution of the VGA input. In the video I posted above (four posts), that TV had a VGA input, which had a max resolution of 640x480. This was not acceptable to me since it wasn't even 720p and I wanted to watch HD content. That's why I chose to use the component input because it was 1920 x 1080; actually it was slightly under.

This could be important because some of content OP speaks of will have HD feeds available such as Hulu. If not, the VGA is fine. He just needs to remember to set video output on the PC to the max the TV will accept.
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by signcarver View Post

Thanks for quoting me Sammy2, Rereading what I wrote, I probably should clarify why I stated I would probably use VGA to component (I have several of these cables from old projectors so thinking about using one is "normal" for me)...

Is this link below a good example of what you would use on the VGA-out of the PC's motherboard and the component-IN of the HD-TV (1920x1080) to provide for HD (1920x1080) resolution if the GPU supports it ?
VGA-component cable
post #17 of 29
Good ole monoprice.. $2.57.
post #18 of 29
That cable will not convert a VGA (RGB) signal to component video (YPbPr). Cables like that are designed to work with equipment that can handle component video through a DB-15 connector. (projectors and such)

In all likelihood the OP's video card will not output component video. (a handful of ATI cards could output via a proprietary adapter, but native component output is pretty rare)

He'll need an active adapter like this instead.
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajhieb View Post

That cable will not convert a VGA (RGB) signal to component video (YPbPr). Cables like that are designed to work with equipment that can handle component video through a DB-15 connector. (projectors and such)

In all likelihood the OP's video card will not output component video. (a handful of ATI cards could output via a proprietary adapter, but native component output is pretty rare)

He'll need an active adapter like this instead.

I guess I should have known that it wasn't that simple..

This adapter will also deal with the audio conversion as well..

BTW, has anyone wondered what happened to the OP in this thread, because (s)he has not returned since posting it..
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

... anyone wondered what happened to the OP in this thread, because (s)he has not returned since posting it..

Not one bit. I just assumed you scared the person away, LOL.

And with computers and niché markets, nothing is every easy. It's just the fantasy we like to give ourselves till we get our hands dirty.
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by signcarver View Post

The manual I saw for that has the RGB "sharing" input3 so the audio would be connected to input3 and there is a switch that disables the video from video/svid and switched it to the RGB input... the manual I have also states (emphasis mine)"The RGB input jack is designed for use in connecting a digital tuner with RGB signal output, and it should accordingly never be used for connecting to a personal computer or other device" but I think this is just in case the pc sets the range beyond what it is capable but because of the warnings I would probably go VGA to component

That warning has kind of scared me off, I don't want to harm the TV set by hooking up my computer to the TV. for audio I have no problem even using my computers external stereo speakers, the issue is the video to my TV. if the RGB jack is not safe to use per the warning, I guess I need some sort of converter then, right? This is too bad as the RGB connector on my TV is physically the same as what is on my computer. It is the same connector that I use for my computer monitor, I guess life is not so simple them.

Now on to this warning about never hooking up a computer to the RGB connector, I don't understand it, will the TV be harmed in anyway if the range is out? I am sorry but I don't even know what this range thing is, I am very novice at this. if the range is out, does that simply mean the picture will be too big for the screen, and can that harm the TV set?

Now I am trying to understand the terminology used also.

Is this true...component video means the same thing as (YPbPr)??? (my TV manual refers to the YPbPr term only when showing the connections)
and
Is this true... VGA means the same thing as RGB connections??? (my tv only refers to RGB when showing the connections, which I assume means red, green blue, the colors of the two CRT guns.)

If this is of any help, my TV manual states....
Component video jack (is this the Y, Pb, Pr jack?) can receive...DVD player 480i format, 15.734kHz Horz freq., 60Hz vert freq. and Digital tuner, ect.. 1080i format, 33.75 kHz Horz. freq., 60 Hz vert, and 480p format 31.468 kHz Horz freq, and 60Hz vert. freq.

My manual also states that
RGB can receive 1080i format, 33.75 kHz, horz, and 60Hz vert. inputs

how does this effect my ability to get video from my computer to the TV set, is this info useful in figuring the range of my TV in regards to hooking up the RGB connector from my computer?

Also I did not mention this but my computer has two different video connectors on it, one is the afore mentioned RGB connector which works on my old monitor and looks just like the one on the TV set, the other connector which goes to my newer monitor, looks similar however it has more pins, 3 rows of 8 pins (24) plus 2 rows of 2 pins (4) (off to side of the 3x8 rows) for a total of 28 pins. Is this useful info to helping me get a computer picture on my TV set?
post #22 of 29
The warning should rightly make you cautious but it doesn't necessarily mean that hooking your computer to that input won't work.

Basically what that warning is telling you is that the RGB/VGA input on your TV isn't compatible with standard PC video resolutions, and attempting to drive it with such could result in damage. That being said, if you can get your PC to output a video resolution compatible with the TV then it should work fine, as the TV doesn't really care, what device is giving it a signal, as long as the signal is compatible.

That of course brings up the question of, can you get your PC to output a compatible signal? And I would guess, maybe but probably not. The other connector you describe sounds like a DVI connector which can output a digital signal that is totally incompatible with your TV or the same signal output on your VGA connector. So let's just focus on the VGA (RGB) video.

Without knowing specifics about your video card, and just guessing at the vintage, and based on just having VGA/DVI connectors I'd say that it probably doesn't natively support 480i or 1080i output. That doesn't mean it can't be done, but it will probably require some 3rd party utilities, and also some trial and error, which might get you back into damaging the TV territory.

The safest solution and probably best quality) is to get a video card that can output 1080i natively on the VGA port. Another option is the video converter I linked to above.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by microbus63 View Post

I have a nice running Pioneer Elite 510 HD tv set, I not too long ago repaired the power supply board (re-soldered all the joints), thanks to info supplied on this forum.

I now have a spare computer and would like to hook it up to the TV so I can view computer content on the TV. My TV has a RGB input, component video inputs (Y, Pe, Pr) , S-video, and Coax video inputs.

The RGB input on the TV looks similar to the video monitor output on one of my older slower computer and my newer computer has a similar connector but with more pins.

Can the older computer be hooked up directly to my TV via the RGB connection?

Ideally I'd like to hook up my newer computer to the TV, is there some converter to allow this to happen?

I'd like to be able to watch free computer content on my TV. I already can watch YouTube videos on my TV via a DVD player, but my DVD player does not support Hulu, which has a lot of good free content. I can watch Hulu free content on my computer, however the small screen at my desk is not the best place or sized monitor that would allow most enjoyment.

any suggestions?

As others have said, the RGB input on your Elite 510 HD TV set is NOT compatible with the VGA output of a computer, so that's out. That only leaves the component YPbPr inputs that are 1080i capable.

Getting a VGA to component converter is one option but then there can be problems that cannot be adjusted.

Though I've not tried it, maybe getting an Nvidia card for your PC that has component YPbPr outputs would be the best bet. One Nvidia card that can do that is the EN8400GS. From my research, it comes with a cable that breaks out to component. It is no longer being sold new but there are many used ones for sale from $20 to $30.

Here's a link to the Asus specifications for that card that lists "HDTV Output (YPbPr) : Yes x 1".
http://www.asus.com/Graphics_Cards/EN8400GS_SILENTHTP512M/#specifications

Here's a link to one being sold on ebay for $27 with free shipping:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/En8400gs-Asus-Silent-Graphic-Card-/331048255067?pt=PCC_Video_TV_Cards&hash=item4d14037e5b

And there are several used ones being sold on amazon from $20 to $60 plus shipping:
http://www.amazon.com/EN8400GS-SILENT-HTP-512M-GeForce/dp/B0015UBPA8/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

Note that this card does require a PCI Express x16 slot in your PC. If you buy one, be sure that it comes with the component adapter cable.

EDIT: Also verify that this card has drivers that are compatible with the version of Windows that you're running, before buying.

I cannot vouch for how well this card works but if it were me, I'd try this card over any other solution for your TV set,
Skylark
Edited by Skylark - 10/22/13 at 4:50am
post #24 of 29
Why is VGA out? That TV manual was probably written before computers with 1080i VGA outputs even existed.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

BTW, has anyone wondered what happened to the OP in this thread, because (s)he has not returned since posting it..
Can't say I'm surprised. I've lost track of how many thread starters post and run. I canonly surmise that he or she found the answer they were looking for and moved on.

That being said, why would anyone still be using a 13-year old rear projection HDTV these days? It may have been a great set in the early days of HDTV, but there are far better sets available today at a much lower cost. That old Pioneer is a dinosaur by today's standards and needs to be replaced.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdavej View Post

Why is VGA out? That TV manual was probably written before computers with 1080i VGA outputs even existed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by signcarver View Post

The manual I saw for that has the RGB "sharing" input3 so the audio would be connected to input3 and there is a switch that disables the video from video/svid and switched it to the RGB input... the manual I have also states (emphasis mine)"The RGB input jack is designed for use in connecting a digital tuner with RGB signal output, and it should accordingly never be used for connecting to a personal computer or other device" but I think this is just in case the pc sets the range beyond what it is capable but because of the warnings I would probably go VGA to component

My understanding is that the RGB output of a digital tuner is not the same as the VGA output from a computer. I read something about that somewhere besides signcarver's post above. I have to go out now but if I can find that write-up again, I'll post a link.

Skylark
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylark View Post


My understanding is that the RGB output of a digital tuner is not the same as the VGA output from a computer. I read something about that somewhere besides signcarver's post above. I have to go out now but if I can find that write-up again, I'll post a link.

Couldn't find the write-up again after some searching. If the original poster is brave, maybe he/she can try connecting the VGA output of a computer to the Elite 510's RGB input and let us know the results.... smile.gif

Skylark
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by captain_video View Post

... why would anyone still be using a 13-year old rear projection HDTV these days? ... there are far better sets available today at a much lower cost. ... and needs to be replaced.

Not that I'm disputing the overall statement, but it's not always so easy. It's possible the person does not the extra money to get a newer tv that he/she would be happy with. There is also the situation that if the TV meets his needs, then why replace it. It's like trying to fix something that is not broken.

I ran into this predicament when I decided to add an HTPC to my home theater. The only difference is that my old HDTV had a daughter board go out. The cost the PC and cables would be the same. Since this was the family TV, I wanted to picture quality to be as good as possible. Any TV is good enough is not my standard. In addition, since I wanted to main the 55" size, I was still looking, at that time, even for the cheap TVs, it was a good $1200 plus. And the TV I was considering to replace the old TV were in the $2000 to $2500 range. The cost of repairs and HDFury to convert the digital signal of the PC to analog component was cheaper by a good $400 (cheap TV) to $1000 (considered TVs). The old TV was repairable. I got almost two years out of it before it broke again. I replaced it that time.

Granted, when you deal with old equipment that doesn't have a new tech, it presents extra challenges. It may require more time to get things to work.
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajhieb View Post

The warning should rightly make you cautious but it doesn't necessarily mean that hooking your computer to that input won't work.

Basically what that warning is telling you is that the RGB/VGA input on your TV isn't compatible with standard PC video resolutions, and attempting to drive it with such could result in damage. That being said, if you can get your PC to output a video resolution compatible with the TV then it should work fine, as the TV doesn't really care, what device is giving it a signal, as long as the signal is compatible.

That of course brings up the question of, can you get your PC to output a compatible signal? And I would guess, maybe but probably not. The other connector you describe sounds like a DVI connector which can output a digital signal that is totally incompatible with your TV or the same signal output on your VGA connector. So let's just focus on the VGA (RGB) video.

Without knowing specifics about your video card, and just guessing at the vintage, and based on just having VGA/DVI connectors I'd say that it probably doesn't natively support 480i or 1080i output. That doesn't mean it can't be done, but it will probably require some 3rd party utilities, and also some trial and error, which might get you back into damaging the TV territory.

The safest solution and probably best quality) is to get a video card that can output 1080i natively on the VGA port. Another option is the video converter I linked to above.

Thanks I looked at the link and there were less than good reviews on that machine, problems with green lines appearing and such.


as far as my TV it is older, but works fine, is HD and I am told by some that these older HD crt based projection tvs in some ways are as good as the latest new ones. I got an excellent deal on it when it was only a few years old, paid $400 for it, new they were $2000-$3000. six months ago the power supply board failed, a known problem on these sets, the soldering was bad on that whole board. so I resoldered all 300 or so connections and now she runs like a top, they say these older sets have better black levels, and they don't streak in fast motion films like some newer sets do. so long as she runs she fits my needs and I frankly can not afford a new 55 inch HD set.

I guess I am out of luck trying to hook up the computer without a lot of trial and error.

thanks
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