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When will an OLED based computer monitor be available?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi Everyone...any guesses?

It seems like previous dates have come and gone. Does the arrival of the new TVs, the Sony video monitors, and the further proliferation into mobile, make a computer display now more likely?

Or might it be like plasma, where concerns about image retention and uneven wear will make OLED never suitable for full time, desktop intensive, computer use?
post #2 of 19
I think the largest OLED display used in a mobile device so far was the Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7, but that was back in 2011 and newer versions have switched to using LCDs.
Doing a quick search shows that people were complaining about burn-in on them, which is probably why they no longer use OLED.

I hope that we will eventually see OLED panels that are as resistant to burn-in as CRTs were, but for now it doesn't look like that is going to happen any time soon.
Until that happens, we probably won't have OLED monitors or tablet devices.

That said, I have been very tempted to pick up one of the Sony PVM-A monitors, even with the potential risk of burn-in.
They have a 30" 4K panel announced for 2014, so I'm waiting to see how much those are going to cost first.
post #3 of 19
First post, heh...

Currently the cheapest available reasonably sized OLED monitor is the Sony PVM 2541a (~5000$)
Flanders Scientific is also making one, but it's in the Sony BVM price range (>10000$)
post #4 of 19
Honestly, a 30" IGZO 4K LCD will make a better computer monitor is much more likely to reach $2000 sometime soon....
post #5 of 19
How good is IGMO 4K LCD?
post #6 of 19
The IGZO prototypes I've seen are smaller. The 4K 20" or so prototypes have been gorgeous. I'm not interesting in an OLED computer monitor at this point because dealing with anything that has a realistic burn-in risk is just unappealing, never mind the cost. IGZO and 4K will ultimately add no real cost to LCDs (probably within 2-3 years). OLED will not be at price parity that quickly....
post #7 of 19
On a more modest note, let's hope curved will appear where it really makes sense and no matter if OLED or LCD.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

The IGZO prototypes I've seen are smaller. The 4K 20" or so prototypes have been gorgeous. I'm not interesting in an OLED computer monitor at this point because dealing with anything that has a realistic burn-in risk is just unappealing, never mind the cost. IGZO and 4K will ultimately add no real cost to LCDs (probably within 2-3 years). OLED will not be at price parity that quickly....
Even with 4K resolution, edge-lit LCDs still have poor contrast, uniformity, and viewing angles though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by irkuck View Post

On a more modest note, let's hope curved will appear where it really makes sense and no matter if OLED or LCD.
So... not at all?
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

Even with 4K resolution, edge-lit LCDs still have poor contrast, uniformity, and viewing angles though.

Uniformity is not an inherent flaw; it's about doing the manufacturing well. Viewing angles seem to be pretty solid with IPS.

IGZO will allow for higher contrast, although as a practical matter, I'm not sure how much more.

I remain cautiously optimistic.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Uniformity is not an inherent flaw; it's about doing the manufacturing well.
I would argue that non-uniformities are inherent in any pixel based display type including plasma. However, PDP to my eye, has always been solidly better than LC in this regard to the point where I do not detect it with the visible eye.

On the other hand I would consider visible mura the strongest and most offensive in LC based displays and is only enhanced due to the viewing angle problems. There are so many causes for mura in LC displays I don't see the problem ever being solved.

I warned AVS many years ago that OLED could possibly suffer a similar problem of visible mura but without the strong viewing angle dependancy. Seems that compensation correction is possible with OLED.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by xrox View Post

I would argue that non-uniformities are inherent in any pixel based display type including plasma. However, PDP to my eye, has always been solidly better than LC in this regard to the point where I do not detect it with the visible eye.

On the other hand I would consider visible mura the strongest and most offensive in LC based displays and is only enhanced due to the viewing angle problems. There are so many causes for mura in LC displays I don't see the problem ever being solved.

I warned AVS many years ago that OLED could possibly suffer a similar problem of visible mura but without the strong viewing angle dependancy. Seems that compensation correction is possible with OLED.

OK, you have persuaded. I would instead argue, "the really terrible uniformity that Samsung, et al. pass off on their TVs is not an inherent flaw, it's about being lazy with manufacturing."

There are so many reasons why OLED doesn't make sense for computer monitors, I don't see the reality of affordable OLED computer monitors anytime soon.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

OK, you have persuaded. I would instead argue, "the really terrible uniformity that Samsung, et al. pass off on their TVs is not an inherent flaw, it's about being lazy with manufacturing."

There are so many reasons why OLED doesn't make sense for computer monitors, I don't see the reality of affordable OLED computer monitors anytime soon.

I didn't know OLED was good for gaming?
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

I think the largest OLED display used in a mobile device so far was the Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7, but that was back in 2011 and newer versions have switched to using LCDs.
Doing a quick search shows that people were complaining about burn-in on them, which is probably why they no longer use OLED.

I hope that we will eventually see OLED panels that are as resistant to burn-in as CRTs were, but for now it doesn't look like that is going to happen any time soon.
Until that happens, we probably won't have OLED monitors or tablet devices.

That said, I have been very tempted to pick up one of the Sony PVM-A monitors, even with the potential risk of burn-in.
They have a 30" 4K panel announced for 2014, so I'm waiting to see how much those are going to cost first.

 

Sony PVM-A.....for calibration reference?  Otherwise, why rush this?  It's a stupid amount of money.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by irkuck View Post

On a more modest note, let's hope curved will appear where it really makes sense and no matter if OLED or LCD.

 

Clarify: are you being sarcastic here?  Yes, if curved is going to have any effect at all, it'll be at a close distance.  But no, it isn't any better of an idea anyway.  :-P

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by boe View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

OK, you have persuaded. I would instead argue, "the really terrible uniformity that Samsung, et al. pass off on their TVs is not an inherent flaw, it's about being lazy with manufacturing."

There are so many reasons why OLED doesn't make sense for computer monitors, I don't see the reality of affordable OLED computer monitors anytime soon.

I didn't know OLED was good for gaming?

 

Unless they're employing a pulse technology of some kind (any kind), they're not going to be.  And currently I don't believe any of them are yet bright enough to manage it.

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by boe View Post

I didn't know OLED was good for gaming?

I have no idea why you posted this in response to my post....
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

Unless they're employing a pulse technology of some kind (any kind), they're not going to be.  And currently I don't believe any of them are yet bright enough to manage it.

... it seems unlikely too many $9000 TVs will be used heavily for gaming. That said, I'm sure a few of our forum owners will put them through the gaming paces...
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Quote:Originally Posted by rogo View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by boe View Post

I didn't know OLED was good for gaming?

I have no idea why you posted this in response to my post....

 

I don't know why he did either, it was a bit of weird non-sequitur.  It makes me wonder if he actually meant something entirely different that came out wrong.

 

 

 

Quote:

Quote:

Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

Unless they're employing a pulse technology of some kind (any kind), they're not going to be.  And currently I don't believe any of them are yet bright enough to manage it.

... it seems unlikely too many $9000 TVs will be used heavily for gaming. That said, I'm sure a few of our forum owners will put them through the gaming paces...

 

Doesn't seem unlikely to me.  While it's true that there won't be too many $9000 TVs bought just for gaming, many folks I know have game consoles (etc.) all centered around the homes primary TV.

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

I have no idea why you posted this in response to my post....
Quote:

I have no idea why I posted in response to you either - I must have gotten mixed up - no excuse for my random reply though.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Viewing angles seem to be pretty solid with IPS.
 

Yes, from side-to-side. But from top-to-bottom picture can wash out. I'm an IPS fan, but LCD tech in general always seems to have this problem to one degree or another.

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