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Hiding speakers in a rock wall ???? - Page 2

post #31 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmerfudII View Post

So... it turns out that the fan in our LHD45 has started squeaking loudly. I've contacted our local dealer and Napolean themselves. Nobody knows why.

The bad part of the situation is that we either have to tear the fireplace right down to nothing OR open up the wall we just built to get at the fan. Its in the back of the unit, between the firebox and the enclosure itself. You can get at it from the front if you remove the 8" front plate, but we have to remove the stone to do so.

Nobody has stepped up with any sort of support, other than the local dealer saying they will replace the fan if they find it defective.

We framed in the fireplace. A gas fitter hooked it up and tested it. I installed the fan kit. Both the dealer and Napolean itself are pointing fingers that its an installation problem. "Is the fireplace level ?" "Because that could cause a lot of problems."

I'll update this thread as the situation resolves itself, or not.

Ouch! Hopefully you'll find a good solution.... Good luck!
post #32 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randall.White View Post

Oh no, hope you find an easy solution. Is there a way you can build a false wall, or hidden door for future problems?

I'll share the solution when we come up with one. Still waiting for some comment from Napolean.
post #33 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Nice work. Looks like you've put a lot of time and effort into the project.

For future reference, you can bury unused cables behind drywall. Install low voltage rings when the time comes to use them (if ever).

We ran conduit wherever we thought that we would need it. The problem with running wires is that there are so many different types. 2, 4, 8 conductor speaker wire, coax, telephone wire, Cat5, Cat6, HDMI, etc. Its rare to know before hand what you will need where. With conduit as long as you get the location right, you have alternatives.

Quote:
Are those 6 dimmers in the wall, to the right of the fireplace? You could consider replacing them with a Lutron Grafik Eye, or a keypad (though it's a little late at this point).

Yes, they are. 2 sets of pot lights at the back of the room, 1 set above the fireplace, 1 central light fixture, 1 set of floor boxes (for lamps) and 1 switch that is no longer used, but may be again shortly.

It isn't late to replace them. That wall is original from the house and might yet be changed. We are waiting to resolve the fan issue before proceeding.
post #34 of 58
You can bury conduit behind drywall too. It doesn't need to be connected to a LV ring or box, as long as you can find it later. I dislike blank plates. I have a few myself, that will disappear next time we paint those rooms.

Speaker wires won't change. Run 2-conductor speaker cables to each potential speaker location, and skip the conduit to speaker locations. Bury unused speaker cables.

Hire an experienced lighting designer, to help avoid banks of switches and dimmers. You can pay hourly for consulting, or free consulting if lighting control is purchased through the designer.
post #35 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmerfudII View Post

I'll share the solution when we come up with one. Still waiting for some comment from Napolean.

Sounds good.
post #36 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

You can bury conduit behind drywall too. It doesn't need to be connected to a LV ring or box, as long as you can find it later. I dislike blank plates. I have a few myself, that will disappear next time we paint those rooms.

I don't understand how you would make use of conduit without a low voltage box. Dangle a wire out of the drywall ? And its not easy to connect conduit to a box once the drywall is done.
Quote:
Speaker wires won't change. Run 2-conductor speaker cables to each potential speaker location, and skip the conduit to speaker locations. Bury unused speaker cables.
Really ? Speaker wires have already changed. Used to be simple pair of 18 ga. Now if the speakers are self amplified you'll want to run shielded or twisted and maybe even AC power or at least low voltage power. Who knows what the current tech will be in 5, 10 years. Ethernet ? Coax ? Fiber ?
Quote:
Hire an experienced lighting designer, to help avoid banks of switches and dimmers. You can pay hourly for consulting, or free consulting if lighting control is purchased through the designer.
Its a $2M house. Designers were used. Light switches were grouped for ease of use. Yes, there are automation protocols that can be used to hide all the switches, but none that we wanted to commit to wiring the house for because its still an emerging field. Lots of proprietary finicky tech out there that mostly works but doesn't or at least not very well.

Having said that, all of the those switches can be replaced with ZWave models in an hour. If I had to chose anything right now, it would be based on ZWave. In 5 years that might change, thus we stuck with conventional switching for now.
post #37 of 58
Boxes aren't usually used for LV; people usually use LV brackets (new construction) or LV rings (retrofit/old work, digging into drywall to use a buried cable or conduit). You want to avoid kinking category cables and HDMI cables.

Lighting designer was not used, or you told him/her that you didn't want lighting control.

For some people, aesthetics are more important than serviceability. A multigang bank of switches/dimmers can be reduced to a single gang keypad, when the loads are 'home run' to a central location. Centrally controlled systems are available from Lutron, Crestron, Vantage, LiteTouch, and Control4, so in reality, you're not really locked into a single vendor. These systems have been in use for decades, in high-end homes (and commercial buildings).

Installation of centralized lighting control, to remove banks of switches, generally requires new construction or significant renovation (down to studs). But, retrofitting centralized lighting control isn't impossible, especially for a room or 2. In fact, it's very easy, and not that difficult, if there is only drywall to contend with repairing, and the room is in proximity to an electrical subpanel. There is also an option for moving the gangs of switches to a nearby closet, and using a single keypad in the living space.

Lutron HomeWorks is the market leader, for lighting control in high end homes. The HomeWorks QS line offers wired and wireless options, for control. It can be retrofit, like z-wave, zigbee, and UPB, but you can't replace gangs of switches without rewiring.

I'm using Lutron Radio Ra2 in my home, the more affordable little brother of QS. It doesn't offer the option for hardwired lighting control, has comparatively limited functionality, and there are fewer keypad/dimmer choices (compared with RA2).

The decision to use centralized lighting control is personal. You've decided you want multiple gangs of switches, rather than keypads. Many people prefer that option, for the reason you cite.

As for retrofitting lighting control, z-wave isn't a bad choice. You might consider Lutron RA2 or HomeWorks QS. Find a lighting designer familiar with the various lighting control options, to help you decide. Or, become an expert, like you did with the fireplace. It's not rocket science, but there are many subtleties to choosing, designing, and implementing, and it's time consuming. Also, HomeWorks is dealer-only; not a DIY option.

This is a Lutron QS 'Architectural' keypad:



This is an example of a QS 'Signature' KP:



This is the only style of KP offered with RA2 (for Decora wall plate openings), paired with a Lutron thermostat:



Multiple button configurations (and colors) offered for both QS and RA2; that's just an example. Page 24 of this Lutron QS brochure shows the keypad configurations, colors, and style options, for QS.
Edited by Neurorad - 11/11/13 at 7:30am
post #38 of 58
I don't think you'll ever benefit from anything other than 12-14 AWG speaker cables, run to the speakers. You could run 2 pairs, I guess, if bi-amping or bi-wiring is your thing, but at that point, you'd be making serious changes to the room acoustical treatments to notice any possible difference.

You'll remodel before your speakers would benefit from fiberoptic cable.

I'm a big proponent of conduit, and over-wiring, but I think the line is drawn at speakers. You disagree, that's personal preference. I'm also a big proponent of respecting opinions. I really like your tile wall. Again, really nice job.

New construction is a huge challenge, made especially difficult when you like to get involved, and want everything perfect. I understand your situation. We're in the middle of a large kitchen renovation, and I don't think I could handle a new house. I've learned that in some situations, it's important to let go, and trust the expert. Unfortunately, it's very difficult to find good experts, for electricians, plumbers, kitchen designers, drywallers, painters, and AV installers. Finding the time to learn enough to become an expert is sometimes impossible.
post #39 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Lighting designer was not used, or you told him/her that you didn't want lighting control.

What we didn't want was a house full of expensive, proprietary junk that doesn't work and can't be upgraded without rewiring the house. We looked at a number of houses before we bought this one. In my opinion, nothing looks worse than a house equipped with a bunch of stuff that was state of the art 10 years ago and now can't be upgraded.

And then there is the cost factor.

So what we actively decided on was putting standard Decor light switches wherever we need them. We can then automate things by replacing the standard Decor switches with Zwave enabled devices, like the ones shown here.

http://www.jascoproducts.com/z-wave/

Z wave is a NON PROPRIETARY standard. You can buy zwave devices from a number of manufacturers.

If we grow tired of the Zwave solution, we can replace it with whatever we want down the road.

Our alarm system runs Zwave, as do our door deadbolts. There is a Linux ZWave module if I want to talk to my Zwave devices directly. Non proprietary devices = versatility.

All this was due to a deliberate, conscious decision making process, guided by our designers. One thing we did was hire designers WHO WEREN'T SUPPLIERS, so that they didn't have vendor biases. You'd be surprised what you hear when the people giving you advice are not the ones trying to sell you black boxes.

Our decisions would make more sense if you were aware of how everything in the whole house works together. Maybe someday I'll write it up.
Edited by elmerfudII - 11/12/13 at 12:16pm
post #40 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

I don't think you'll ever benefit from anything other than 12-14 AWG speaker cables, run to the speakers. You could run 2 pairs, I guess, if bi-amping or bi-wiring is your thing, but at that point, you'd be making serious changes to the room acoustical treatments to notice any possible difference.

A lot of my passive speakers are going to made into active speakers so that devices (smart phones, tablets, laptops and servers) can send them content and they play it. ie, they will become DLNA renderers.

This will be done by embedding a Raspberry Pi and an amplifier into each speaker. That pretty much necessitates running Cat5 to each speaker.

Like I said, there is more to this house than is being discussed here.
post #41 of 58
That's cool, one can never 'over wire' a house. Most of my cables that I've retrofit I will probably never use (running 2-3 extra), but it gives me peace of mind.

Z-wave had a bumpy start, but, from what I've read, it's maturing well. Initially, it was good practice to use z-wave products from the same manufacturer, because everything wasn't interoperable. But, that was over a year ago.
post #42 of 58
Any update on the fireplace?
post #43 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randall.White View Post

Any update on the fireplace?

Yes, there is. Sorry for the delay in replying.

The fireplace fan has now quit entirely. We purposely bought a fireplace that had a built in fan so that it warmed house and provided a cozy feeling.

I contacted our local dealer and the Napoleon factory and told them of our problem. I requested warranty to replace the fan as per the owner's manual. (http://www.napoleonproducts.com/downloads/fireplaces/manuals/W415-0834.pdf) Here is what the warranty part of the manual says.
Quote:
W415-0834 / E / 06.13.13 56 EN
NAPOLEON® warrants its products against manufacturing defects to the original purchaser only. Registering your warranty is not
necessary. Simply provide your proof of purchase along with the model and serial number to make a warranty claim. NAPOLEON® reserves the right to
have its representative inspect any product or part thereof prior to honouring any warranty claim. Provided that the purchase was made t
hrough an authorizedNAPOLEON® dealer your appliance is subject to the following conditions and limitations:

Warranty coverage begins on the date of original installation.

This factory warranty is non-transferable and may not be extended whatsoever by any of our representatives.
The gas appliance must be installed by a licensed, authorized service technician or contractor. Installation must be done in ac
cordance with the installation instructions included with the product and all local and national building and fire codes.

This limited warranty does not cover damages caused by misuse, lack of maintenance, accident, alterations, abuse or neglect and
parts installed from other manufacturers will nullify this warranty.
This limited warranty further does not cover any scratches, dents, corrosion or discoloring caused by excessive heat, abrasive
and chemical cleaners nor chipping on porcelain enamel parts, mechanical breakage of PHAZER™ logs and embers.
This warranty extends to the repair or replacement of warranted parts which are defective in material or workmanship provided t
hat the product has been operated in accordance with the operation instructions and under normal conditions.
After the fi rst year, with respect to this President’s Lifetime Limited Warranty, NAPOLEON® may, at its discretion, fully discharge all ob ligations with
respect to this warranty by refunding to the original warranted purchaser the wholesale price of any warranted but defective part(s).
NAPOLEON® will not be responsible for installation, labour or any other expenses related to the reinstallation of a warranted part and such expenses are
not covered by this warranty.

Notwithstanding any provisions contained in the President’s Lifetime Limited Warranty, NAPOLEON’S responsibility under this war
ranty is defined as above and it shall not in any event extend to any incidental, consequential or indirect damages.
This warranty defines the obligations and liability of NAPOLEON® with respect to the NAPOLEON® gas appliance and any other warranties expressed
orimplied with respect to this product, its components or accessories are excluded.
NAPOLEON® neither assumes, nor authorizes any third party to assume, on its behalf, any other liabilities with respect to the sale of this product.

NAPOLEON® will not be responsible for: over-firing, downdrafts, spillage caused by environmental conditions such as rooftops, buildings, nearby trees,
hills, mountains, inadequate vents or ventilation, excessive venting configurations, insufficient makeup air, or negative air pressures which may or may not
be caused by mechanical systems such as exhaust fans, furnaces, clothes dryers, etc.
Any damages to the appliance, combustion chamber, heat exchanger, plated trim or other components due to water, weather damage,
long periods ofdampness, condensation, damaging chemicals or cleaners will not be the responsibility of NAPOLEON®.
All parts replaced under the President’s Limited Lifetime Warranty Policy are subject to a single claim.
During the first 10 years NAPOLEON® will replace or repair the defective parts covered by the lifetime warranty at our discretion free of c
harge. From 10years to life, NAPOLEON® will provide replacement parts at 50% of the current retail price.
All parts replaced under the warranty will be covered for a period of 90 days from the date of their installation.
The manufacturer may require that defective parts or products be returned or that digital pictures be provided to support the c
laim. Returned products areto be shipped prepaid to the manufacturer for investigation. If a product is found to be defective, the manufacturer will repair or replace such defect.
Before shipping your appliance or defective components, your dealer must obtain an authorization number. Any merchandise shipped without
authorization will be refused and returned to sender.
Shipping costs are not covered under this warranty.
Additional service fees may apply if you are seeking warranty service from a dealer.
Warranty labour allowance is only for the replacement of the warranted part. Travel, diagnostic tests, shipping and other related charges are not covered
by this warranty.

Napoleon and our dealer are denying warranty coverage except to replace the fan motor if they find it to be defective because we did not have the dealer install the fireplace. Basically, their interpretation of "The gas appliance must be installed by a licensed, authorized service technician or contractor. Installation must be done in accordance with the installation instructions included with the product and all local and national building and fire codes." is that the dealer installs it. I need to mention here that the dealer's quote for installing our fireplace was horrendous.

They are insinuating that "we" didn't install it properly. Our Napoleon dealer did install the ductwork. My contractor and I framed the wall and built the fireplace support. We placed the fireplace on the support. I had a certified journeyman gas fitter connect the ducting and the gas and test the unit. I got a building permit to install the fireplace and had it inspected. It passed with flying colors. My contractor put the rock in place. My contractor and the gas fitter both thought the installation was first class. Everything was level, proper spacing was used, proper connections were done, etc.

I managed to get my cell phone under the firebox where I could take pictures of the fan. The fan is installed properly. The wing nut is tight, the wires are connected, the firebox is not bent in any way. Everything is perfectly clean.

I've found Napoleon extremely difficult to work with. The dealer network is designed to lock you into using their (highly inflated) installation services. I should mention that this is our 3rd Napoleon fireplace.

At this point I have several options.

1) The fan can supposedly be replaced by tearing out the entire guts of the firebox and getting to it that way. The quote is for 4+ hours of labor to do so. Plus we'll need to replace the sand that is now in the fireplace as part of the drift wood kit. A gas certified technician is required to do this work because the gas valve and other parts need to be removed to open up the firebox. It will be a $500 job before its done.

2) We can rip open the stone wall under the front of the fireplace and remove the service panel that is presently covered by stone. This will allow us access to the fan. I suspect that this would take 2-3 hours of my contractor's time to remove the stone and replace it, if it can be replaced as nicely as it is now. That is my big worry, because its nearly perfect now.

3) The problem with options #1 and #2 is that it merely replaces the existing fan with a new one. Nobody at Napoleon has explained to me why the first one failed. Personally, I think the firebox gets too hot for the fan and it melts the bearings or wiring in the motor. I don't have any faith that a new fan would last any longer than the first fan did.

The LHD45 has duct cut outs in the sides of the firebox enclosure. I'm thinking that we could open up the back of the TV recess and my contractor (who is very thin) could get behind the wall. We could then place 2 6 inch fans on the duct cut outs and use them to circulate air from the fireplace wall volume, through the fireplace and into the room. I contacted Napoleon about this option and they say it has not been tested on this particular model. It has been tested and is used on other models. The 6 inch duct fans could be wired to be variable speed. They would move a lot more air than the Napoleon fan and they would probably be a lot quieter.

And that is where it stands right now.
post #44 of 58
Thread Starter 
A couple more thoughts.

The LHD45 is beautiful both when running and not running. But especially when running at night. The flame is mesmerizing. We get a lot of compliments on it.

I suspect that our fireplace runs very hot because there is 30 feet of ducting above it. For those not aware, these fireplaces use coaxial ducting. The hot air goes out the center of the duct and the cold air comes in the outside duct. The ducting acts as a heat exchanger, preheating the incoming air. Instead of combusting cold air, the air is probably 150F by the time it gets down to the fireplace. I bet this contributes to the fan issue.

I wired up the TV and hung it on the weekend. I pulled 2 HDMI and 2 Cat 6 cables through the TV conduit, through the mechanical room and into the AV closet. The TV conduit is 2 inch diameter IIRC. The mechanical room to AV closet is 3 inch. The conduit worked great. It was no problem pulling the cables.

The speaker bar and woofer sound pretty good. We had a party on the weekend with about 20 people in attendance. Several people were watching a football game on the TV and reported the sound was good.

Here are some pictures of the fireplace and wall as it sits now. I had to hang the TV because we were having a party. We haven't /won't be doing anything to the wall until we get the fireplace issue solved.

DSC_1824.JPG

DSC_1823.JPG

That isn't the TV that is going to end up in the room. That is my trusty Samsung LN52A750. I'll buy a 60 or 65" after Christmas when the prices drop a bit more.
Edited by elmerfudII - 11/25/13 at 12:11pm
post #45 of 58
Looks really nice. Too bad that you're going to have to do some demo work to it.

If you don't mind telling us/me, how much did they want to charge you for their people to install it? I have a friend who does this for a living, well works with natural/propane gas installs.

Does that fireplace have LED's in it? I've seen a few that have lights at the bottom. The wife likes them so I'm looking to get one with lights and black or some other colored glass.
post #46 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randall.White View Post

Looks really nice. Too bad that you're going to have to do some demo work to it.
Thanks !
Quote:
If you don't mind telling us/me, how much did they want to charge you for their people to install it? I have a friend who does this for a living, well works with natural/propane gas installs.

I don't know the exact numbers at the moment, but I think we got charged about $1000 for them just to put the ducting in. We had the plenum where it went open from floor to roof and all the old ducting removed. It took 2 of their people about 2 hours to do it. We changed the wall design after they placed the ducting and they wanted $400 labor to "reinstall" the fireplace. Which essentially meant install a new connector between the ducting and the fireplace in the new position.

I'm embarrassed to talk about the costs because I got taken to the cleaners. Of all the work we did in the house, this fireplace is the only component that got out of control, mostly because I knew nothing about them before we started. If I had to do it again, I'd buy it online on eBay or Amazon, I'd buy the ducting online as well and I'd hire an experienced installer by the hour to help me install it.

A few things got me. a) I was extremely busy with the renos in the rest of the house. b) I knew nothing about fireplaces. c) The fireplace seller would not sell me ducting without installing it themselves. d) Fireplaces need permits and inspections. e) The sellers make a really big deal out of the permits and installation difficulty. So I relied on the seller for a full service install. Luckily I didn't rely on them for the framing nor for the stone and its installation, because that would have just been horrendous. They pushed me to do the framing and to supply the rock, but I knew we could at least do that part and there were no issues with us doing it.

In the end we did the framing, we placed the fireplace, a gas fitter and I hooked up the ducting and the gas and my contractor did the stone. The stone was $17/ft^2 and I bought 90 ft^2 of it. It took him about 2 days at $35/hour to board the wall and place the stone. Its real stone from a quarry. There are bits of fossils buried in the face of the stone. Its pretty neat.

Quote:
Does that fireplace have LED's in it? I've seen a few that have lights at the bottom. The wife likes them so I'm looking to get one with lights and black or some other colored glass.
This one doesn't. We almost installed the Starfire GD70 and it had a light in it. We weren't sure we liked or needed that. This fireplace looks nice even when its not lit without a light. We did install the reflective panels which help throw more heat into the room and give the flame more depth. We had it running last night while watching TV. It sure gives the room a nice cozy feel and it warms it up when the HVAC system in the house is turning down the heat for the night. Its very nice.

FWIW, there was a fireplace in this wall when we bought the house. It was a huge traditional gas fired model sitting right on the floor. It didn't have a fan. The flame was tiny. It was a big black box when it wasn't running. I am very happy we replaced it. The room has a much different feel to it now.

I've learned a lot reading AVS forums. Finding the Pioneer speaker bar, for example ! I'm happy to give back answering questions about the fireplace if people have more.
Edited by elmerfudII - 11/26/13 at 7:58am
post #47 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmerfudII View Post

The speaker bar and woofer sound pretty good. We had a party on the weekend with about 20 people in attendance. Several people were watching a football game on the TV and reported the sound was good.

.

Thank you for the update on this. Sorry for all the issues you are having, but sounds like it will be all worth it in the end. Looks fabulous!
post #48 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcarfan View Post

Looks fabulous!
It actually looks way better in real life. The images aren't catching the colors in the rock
post #49 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmerfudII View Post

It actually looks way better in real life. The images aren't catching the colors in the rock

I know what you are saying. My house is currently under construction and I did my basement fireplace similar to this. It's tiled all around with a TV niche. Photos absolutely does no justice with mine either. I went with a standard fireplace, so that part is not as nice as this.
post #50 of 58
Do you have a remote for your fireplace? I went looking at a few and all have a sensor that is required to use a remote. If you do, where did you place the sensor and is it visible from your seating location?
Edited by Randall.White - 12/6/13 at 12:40am
post #51 of 58
Thread Starter 
Time for an update, I guess.

First off, we didn't opt for a remote. I'll be putting a thermostat on the wall to control it.

My contractor/helper was able to gain access to the fireplace cavity via removing the TV and the drywall behind it. He was then able to climb into the cavity via the opening that created. He is a pretty small guy.

We cut open the factory duct cut out and attached a 5" take off, elbow, 3 feet of pipe and a 5" duct fan to each side of the fireplace. Each fan is rated at 140 CFM at 0" DP. They probably move about 100CFM each through the fireplace. The fans were mounted up and away from each side of the fireplace, to minimize the heat to them if the fireplace is run without them.

We've used the fireplace on and off for over week now with the new fans. It works great. The fans are really quiet, just a low hum when they are running. The front wall stays about the same temp. Its probably a lot cooler on the inside, but now there is a lot of heat coming out and up from the face of the fireplace now.

The room feels much warmer, as does near the fireplace. I think that is because the fans are moving a lot more air/heat out of the firebox into the room.

Overall I am really happy with how it works now.
post #52 of 58
Thread Starter 
One more thing... we love the height the TV is at. It allows very comfortable watching when slouched on the couch.
post #53 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmerfudII View Post

One more thing... we love the height the TV is at. It allows very comfortable watching when slouched on the couch.

Glad you got it figured out without destroying that wall. How high is your TV? I have mine mounted fairly high too but we sit about 10' away and we can use a laptop and still have full view of the TV.

Where does the heated air come out at? Is there a slit or something between the frame and the glass? We are still looking for the "perfect" fireplace rolleyes.gif

Does your speaker/TV get warm from the fireplace?
post #54 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmerfudII View Post

A couple more thoughts.

The LHD45 is beautiful both when running and not running. But especially when running at night. The flame is mesmerizing. We get a lot of compliments on it.

I suspect that our fireplace runs very hot because there is 30 feet of ducting above it. For those not aware, these fireplaces use coaxial ducting. The hot air goes out the center of the duct and the cold air comes in the outside duct. The ducting acts as a heat exchanger, preheating the incoming air. Instead of combusting cold air, the air is probably 150F by the time it gets down to the fireplace. I bet this contributes to the fan issue.

I wired up the TV and hung it on the weekend. I pulled 2 HDMI and 2 Cat 6 cables through the TV conduit, through the mechanical room and into the AV closet. The TV conduit is 2 inch diameter IIRC. The mechanical room to AV closet is 3 inch. The conduit worked great. It was no problem pulling the cables.

The speaker bar and woofer sound pretty good. We had a party on the weekend with about 20 people in attendance. Several people were watching a football game on the TV and reported the sound was good.

Here are some pictures of the fireplace and wall as it sits now. I had to hang the TV because we were having a party. We haven't /won't be doing anything to the wall until we get the fireplace issue solved.

DSC_1824.JPG

DSC_1823.JPG

That isn't the TV that is going to end up in the room. That is my trusty Samsung LN52A750. I'll buy a 60 or 65" after Christmas when the prices drop a bit more.

I contacted Napoleon and this is the same fireplace they told me I should use, but they said not to mount a TV above it. Did you get the same info? I read a few things online and watched a couple videos from dealers, they said leave at least 14" between the top of the fireplace and bottom of the TV.
post #55 of 58
Forgot to ask, did you end up getting a new TV (60/65)? If so, would you want to post a new picture? I have a 64" and would really like to see the size difference.

Also since there is a fan installed, where does the heat come out? is it just through the glass? or?
post #56 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randall.White View Post

Forgot to ask, did you end up getting a new TV (60/65)? If so, would you want to post a new picture? I have a 64" and would really like to see the size difference.

I haven't bought the TV yet. I probably won't until fall now. I've hardly had time to watch TV and, quite frankly, other than being a bit small (52"), our Samsung LNA750 still rocks. I'll eventually get a new TV in that wall, but I'll probably get the media room done in the basement first. Everything takes time.
Quote:
Also since there is a fan installed, where does the heat come out? is it just through the glass? or?
The fans (one on each side) blow into the side of the fireplace enclosure, around the firebox. The warmed air comes out the face of the fireplace. Its really effective.

BTW, everyone loves the height that TV is at. When we were shopping for a fireplace and planning things, everyone was telling us to get the TV as low as possible. The speaker bar setup raised it a bit. I'm happy it isn't lower.

We really love this room. I don't watch much TV, but when we do, its comfy. I think its a great room for casual viewing. I wouldn't change much about it.
post #57 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmerfudII View Post

I haven't bought the TV yet. I probably won't until fall now. I've hardly had time to watch TV and, quite frankly, other than being a bit small (52"), our Samsung LNA750 still rocks. I'll eventually get a new TV in that wall, but I'll probably get the media room done in the basement first. Everything takes time.
The fans (one on each side) blow into the side of the fireplace enclosure, around the firebox. The warmed air comes out the face of the fireplace. Its really effective.

BTW, everyone loves the height that TV is at. When we were shopping for a fireplace and planning things, everyone was telling us to get the TV as low as possible. The speaker bar setup raised it a bit. I'm happy it isn't lower.

We really love this room. I don't watch much TV, but when we do, its comfy. I think its a great room for casual viewing. I wouldn't change much about it.

Thanks for the reply. Did your installer block off the TV section with anything? or put your wires inside of something? I've talked to a few installers and they say the heat will destroy the TV. That's why I was wondering how the heat came out, if it was out the top or wherever.

Thanks again, sorry to bug you with all these questions.
post #58 of 58
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randall.White View Post

Thanks for the reply. Did your installer block off the TV section with anything? or put your wires inside of something? I've talked to a few installers and they say the heat will destroy the TV. That's why I was wondering how the heat came out, if it was out the top or wherever.

Thanks again, sorry to bug you with all these questions.

Yikes ! You posted this 3 weeks ago. Sorry for not answering sooner.

You aren't bugging me with questions... I'm happy to share and this is how people learn. Ask away.

Err... the "installer" is me and the finishing carpenter that I hire. We had the area behind the TV blocked off with drywall, but removed it when we had to redo the fireplace fans. Its still unblocked, though we may block it off again this week when we put the trim on the wall.

I know what they say about heat and TVs. Everyone told me the same thing. I don't know if its how be designed (ventilated) our system, but heat isn't a factor at all. It is a bit warm (as in like a summer day) in front of the TV screen, but that is it. Its cold out today and we've have the fireplace running the whole time and nothing a foot above the fireplace is more than warm to the touch.

We put 6" duct fans on 4' long 6" pipe sections and connected one to each side of the fireplace box where there were cut outs for similar ducting. The fans probably push 150 CFM each. They draw air from inside the fireplace cavity and push it through between the fireplace enclosure and the firebox itself, out in the area under the glass front. This ventilation system seems to work great. Its been several months now and we've had no problems.

We ran 2" plastic conduit behind the TV for future wiring. I fished an Ethernet and 2 HDMI cables through it already. It works great.

We still love the height of the TV. It was great for watching the Olympics.
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