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AVR and EDID the three solutions that seem to work

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
I have seen several edid related posts lately and I thought I would provide a quick guide to the solutions that work. If you have an HTPC and it's connected to an AVR you most likely have encountered an EDID issue at some point in time. EDID issues usually pop up for the strangest reasons, make you want to beat your head against the wall, and are typically pretty hard to get rid of. Here are some of the solutions that people have found to get around EDID.

The first is well documented here on AVS forum and deals with changing the file that stores edid. The thread documenting this process is here:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1227161/edid-overrides-to-solve-bitstreaming-issues-for-ati-5xxxs
This works well for many, but I never could get it to work perfect.

The other way is to purchase a HDMI Detective. This device sits between your AVR and your HTPC and stores the EDID information of your receiver/TV and shows the information as always on.
http://www.amazon.com/Gefen-EXT-HDMI-EDIDP-HDmi-Detective-Plus/dp/B001RIMZUW/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1382819089&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=hdmi+detective
From everything I read these devices work great, but they cost about $90 and for those trying to keep the wallet as untouched as possible it can seem steep.

The final way is a workaround that I have been using for about 5 months now and has solved all of my problems.
My EDID issues were specific to when I first would turn on my pc. I use dual screen pushing the DVI to HDMI to my projector, and the HDMI port to my receiver. When I first boot up the edid of my receiver would take over and I would not have picture on my projector. This required me to either pull out the dvi and put it back in, or to disable and enable the video card manually.
After some time I decided that the later process had to have some means by which I could automate this disable.
I found this in a program called DEVMANVIEW there is a similar program called DEVMON that will do the same functionality.
Essentially these software programs allow you to disable and enable any device on your system.

Here is a link:
http://download.cnet.com/DevManView-64-bit/3000-2094_4-75176240.html

I decided on DEVMANVIEW as it comes with a GUI that allows you to identify all of the devices on your computer which you will need to set up the automation.

The basics of what I did was to create a task in the Task Scheduler and to setup that task to run on startup with a 30 second delay. The task runs a simple script through devmanview to call a disable and enable of the video card thus refreshing the edid information in the process. I also setup a shortcut on my desktop so that I could run this on demand as well.

I hope this helps, and feel free to hit me up with any questions.

JJ
post #2 of 3
JJ,


Could you provide a copy of your script?

What video card are you using?

Have you tried AVR Audio Guard?
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1317491/silent-stream-bug

While Audio Guard is oriented toward audio problems, one of its troubleshooting options is to do a device reinitialization. Since it blanks the screen, it's certainly doing things to the HDMI interface, but I don't know if it does a full reset of the video hardware.

I'd be interested to know if its reset also works for you. I've had some problems which it usually solves, but I've already wasted enough time fighting with them that I'd like to know if Audio Guard works as well as DevManView before I invest the time in getting the latter to work.

Thanks for whatever help you can provide.
post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 
I have an AMD A10-5700 and use the onboard graphics. Great chip, works excellent for htpc use.

For the use of DevManView I have created a task that is scheduled to run at startup with a 30 second delay.

The action (script) of the task looks like this:


For the action you start a program. DevManView.exe and add the argument /disable_enable "AMD Radeon HD 7660D"

You would of course replace the "AMD Radeon HD 7660D" with the name of your video card. This needs to be the name that the computer uses to identify the card. DevManView has a GUi that you can use to find that name.

That is about all it takes. Just Download DevManView and setup a task.

The other thing that I have done is to create a shortcut on the desktop so that I can run it on demand.
in the shortcut I run the following command
C:\Windows\System32\schtasks.exe /run /tn "Video fix"

Video fix is the name of the task that I created.

Pretty simple, and the nice thing is that DevManView is just a developer utility so it doesn't have overhead on your system.
I have not tried the AVR Audio Guard, but I will check it out. Thanks for the info.
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