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The official AVS "PC Game Console" thread - Page 5

post #121 of 429
I have a 680 gtx (4gig) and an I5 3570k, and run most games on max settings on my 1080p plasma screen with zero problems.
post #122 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marafice Eye View Post

The i5-2400 isn't bad, nor is it great. it's mid-range, but as you're preferring to cannibalize (can be a very good money saver) it will do you fine for now. it's not a slouch by any means, and being as you're putting it in a small case, and probably not wanting to overclock, it'll do you fine.

The 760 is a phenomenal bang-for-your-buck card, and a great budget choice. No problems there. As Daver pointed out, with some tweaks to your settings in game, you can manage 60fps most likely. You'll probably just want to make sure AA is off, and things like DoF, Ambient Occlusion, and particle effects are lowered.

An 850w PSU in a system like you're making is complete overkill. that CPU is an 84w power draw at 100% load, and the 760 is sub 200w. Unless you plan to cnnibalize this build at a later date, you don't need that much power. a 500-600w would be more than enough (although this is coming from the guy running a 1000w PSU when a 700w would be enough lol)

You definitely want to double your RAM to 8gb, 4 just barely cuts it nowadays. If you can get it cheap, go for 16. 1600 RAM is fine as very few games actually prefer faster RAM. BF4 being the only one I know of.

- Bioshock Infinite 17.35gb
- Borderlands 12.6gb
- Borderlands 2 10.5gb
- ME trilogy 37.6gb for all three games

All very good info, but just to clarify, as I think I've seen it mentioned here in the AVS PC forums, having a PSU rated at a higher wattage does not mean that your drawing it's maximum wattage at all times. It means you have the head room for adding equipment.

So a 1000w with a better efficiency rating should consume less energy than a lower wattage PSU with worse efficiency.

That being said I always buy the best cases, and powersupply's that I can afford (note that these are two parts that most PC first time builders try to spend the least on) the reason being, 1. Is that you'll have you case forever, buying one that can be "cannabilized" forever just makes sense in form and function. And 2. buying a cheap PSU never ends well. EVER.

Build a PC for a few thousand dollars and throwing a $30 PSU just doesn't make sense.

JB
post #123 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Bolton View Post

All very good info, but just to clarify, as I think I've seen it mentioned here in the AVS PC forums, having a PSU rated at a higher wattage does not mean that your drawing it's maximum wattage at all times. It means you have the head room for adding equipment.

So a 1000w with a better efficiency rating should consume less energy than a lower wattage PSU with worse efficiency.

That being said I always buy the best cases, and powersupply's that I can afford (note that these are two parts that most PC first time builders try to spend the least on) the reason being, 1. Is that you'll have you case forever, buying one that can be "cannabilized" forever just makes sense in form and function. And 2. buying a cheap PSU never ends well. EVER.

Build a PC for a few thousand dollars and throwing a $30 PSU just doesn't make sense.

JB

Oh exactly, and I wasn't trying to get him to buy a cheapo one, as the one he's thinking of is a great one, I'm simply saying a lower total wattage is more than enough, especially with the small size he's going for. He won't be OCing and most likely won't be running SLI in a small case like that, so realistically a 80 Plus Bronze or better 600w is plenty.
post #124 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marafice Eye View Post

Oh exactly, and I wasn't trying to get him to buy a cheapo one, as the one he's thinking of is a great one, I'm simply saying a lower total wattage is more than enough, especially with the small size he's going for. He won't be OCing and most likely won't be running SLI in a small case like that, so realistically a 80 Plus Bronze or better 600w is plenty.

No worries, I wasn't trying to call you out, just that some of the newer guys (not in this thread) think that higher wattage means uses more at all times.

This is a pretty cool thread BTW!
post #125 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marafice Eye View Post

The i5-2400 isn't bad, nor is it great. it's mid-range, but as you're preferring to cannibalize (can be a very good money saver) it will do you fine for now. it's not a slouch by any means, and being as you're putting it in a small case, and probably not wanting to overclock, it'll do you fine.

The 760 is a phenomenal bang-for-your-buck card, and a great budget choice. No problems there. As Daver pointed out, with some tweaks to your settings in game, you can manage 60fps most likely. You'll probably just want to make sure AA is off, and things like DoF, Ambient Occlusion, and particle effects are lowered.

An 850w PSU in a system like you're making is complete overkill. that CPU is an 84w power draw at 100% load, and the 760 is sub 200w. Unless you plan to cnnibalize this build at a later date, you don't need that much power. a 500-600w would be more than enough (although this is coming from the guy running a 1000w PSU when a 700w would be enough lol)

You definitely want to double your RAM to 8gb, 4 just barely cuts it nowadays. If you can get it cheap, go for 16. 1600 RAM is fine as very few games actually prefer faster RAM. BF4 being the only one I know of.

- Bioshock Infinite 17.35gb
- Borderlands 12.6gb
- Borderlands 2 10.5gb
- ME trilogy 37.6gb for all three games

Very helpful response Eye; Thank you! I'll look for a PS as quiet as possible in the 500-600W range as you suggest. I only sit 3 feet from the PC so noise matters.

So it looks like a typical, mainstream PC game averages around 13GB in size. I don't think my SSD storage option for them on the system drive is going to work. Even with 400GB of space available for games after the OS, apps, and productivity files, I can envision going beyond the ~ 30 game capacity before being ready for a major upgrade or new build. I'll just purchase one or two new magnetic drives around a TB or so. I'll go with two if I want to periodically back the stored games up.

Another question if I could: My current Asrock mobo's (H67M) PCIe x16 slot is v2 not 3. Is this going to cause any problem for the EVGA GTX-760 card?

Eric
post #126 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by elockett View Post

Very helpful response Eye; Thank you! I'll look for a PS as quiet as possible in the 500-600W range as you suggest. I only sit 3 feet from the PC so noise matters.

So it looks like a typical, mainstream PC game averages around 13GB in size. I don't think my SSD storage option for them on the system drive is going to work. Even with 400GB of space available for games after the OS, apps, and productivity files, I can envision going beyond the ~ 30 game capacity before being ready for a major upgrade or new build. I'll just purchase one or two new magnetic drives around a TB or so. I'll go with two if I want to periodically back the stored games up.

Another question if I could: My current Asrock mobo's (H67M) PCIe x16 slot is v2 not 3. Is this going to cause any problem for the EVGA GTX-760 card?

Eric

Elockett, if you have 2 ssd's, i'd suggest running the OS on SSD 1, putting games on SSD 2, and buying a magnetic drive for all of your other files. That is how I've set up mine and I am pretty happy:)
post #127 of 429
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by elockett View Post

I'm in the process of moving from console (xbox360) to PC-based gaming.

A couple more thoughts:

I take it your small amp doesn't have HDMI-IN, right? Because Sound Blaster cards are disappearing from gaming rigs these days, but some people like them for high-end audio decoding and whatnot. Just FYI, if you can do HDMI audio via the video card, it makes configuration of software and wiring easier, and saves space in the case for a little more air flow.

In my book, SSD is a must for Windows OS. Beyond that, it becomes an expensive nicety. Games do like being on a SSD, but not nearly as much as Windows does. So my suggestion is to get at least a 128gig SSD for Windows only - you can go smaller if you are very good about only keeping the OS on it, but I tend to install programs on my SSD at times. If you can find a deal on a 256gig, even better. Also get the biggest quality hard drive you can afford for all your programs, games, music, movies, and whatnot. (EDIT: Josh ninja-ed me on this! smile.gif ) If you have the bigger SSD, you can use "Steam Mover" to move the current game(s) you are playing onto the SSD, and move it back to the hard drive if you aren't playing it as much. A tip - Steam Mover can move anything, not just Steam games.

Eye beat me to the game sizes, so here's another - Batman Arkham Origins is around 19gigs.
post #128 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by elockett View Post

Very helpful response Eye; Thank you! I'll look for a PS as quiet as possible in the 500-600W range as you suggest. I only sit 3 feet from the PC so noise matters.

So it looks like a typical, mainstream PC game averages around 13GB in size. I don't think my SSD storage option for them on the system drive is going to work. Even with 400GB of space available for games after the OS, apps, and productivity files, I can envision going beyond the ~ 30 game capacity before being ready for a major upgrade or new build. I'll just purchase one or two new magnetic drives around a TB or so. I'll go with two if I want to periodically back the stored games up.

Another question if I could: My current Asrock mobo's (H67M) PCIe x16 slot is v2 not 3. Is this going to cause any problem for the EVGA GTX-760 card?

Eric

For a PSU, look at the Seasonic X series, PC Power and Cooling's Silencer series, Be Quiet! also makes really good quiet PSUs, but with all you'll be paying a premium.

Do yourself a favor and just buy a 3TB mechanical, they're about $120 or less these days, and you'll be set for games and anything else you want to put on it. And at the price, 2 of them would be relatively cheap.

the 760 will work fine in PCI-e 2.0, not having 3.0 isn't a big deal at all, I wouldn't worry about it.
post #129 of 429
Hi Josh,

I appreciate your suggestion concerning SSD storage, but I don't think it will work for a couple of reasons:
1: Each SSD only has a capacity of 120GB, so with an average game size of 13GB I could only store 8 or 9 games on one of them (with the other one used for the OS, apps, and general productivity files).
2: The purpose of the second SSD is to serve as a quasi-hot spare for the system SSD if it fails. Not only will this PC serve as a gaming box, it will also be my main personal productivity machine. Given the productivity requirement, it is important I be able to restore the PC quickly in the event of system drive failure. I currently backup full windows system images on a third 250GB laptop drive overnight, every night, and this arrangement has served me well so I'll replicate (likely with a much larger magnetic drive in place of the current laptop drive) in the new PC.
post #130 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaverJ View Post

A couple more thoughts:

I take it your small amp doesn't have HDMI-IN, right? Because Sound Blaster cards are disappearing from gaming rigs these days, but some people like them for high-end audio decoding and whatnot. Just FYI, if you can do HDMI audio via the video card, it makes configuration of software and wiring easier, and saves space in the case for a little more air flow.

In my book, SSD is a must for Windows OS. Beyond that, it becomes an expensive nicety. Games do like being on a SSD, but not nearly as much as Windows does. So my suggestion is to get at least a 128gig SSD for Windows only - you can go smaller if you are very good about only keeping the OS on it, but I tend to install programs on my SSD at times. If you can find a deal on a 256gig, even better. Also get the biggest quality hard drive you can afford for all your programs, games, music, movies, and whatnot. (EDIT: Josh ninja-ed me on this! smile.gif ) If you have the bigger SSD, you can use "Steam Mover" to move the current game(s) you are playing onto the SSD, and move it back to the hard drive if you aren't playing it as much. A tip - Steam Mover can move anything, not just Steam games.

Eye beat me to the game sizes, so here's another - Batman Arkham Origins is around 19gigs.

The amp does not have HDMI connectors of any kind; only analog RCA inputs. It's a unusual design intended to use sources like bluray players with multi-channel analog outputs. Technically speaking, it's a multi-channel integrated amp but I'm using it as a power amp. By using the multi-channel outputs of the SoundBlaster (it's one of the higher-ended Z variants) I'm effectively using the PC as a preamp processor (aka: prepro). The combination sounds quite good and I'm happy with it. It's now just a matter of beefing up the storage and video processing to support gaming.

I've mentioned the desire to save space on my desktop more than once. In the recent past I was using a compact Yamaha AVR as the amplifier, plus using it as a switcher for my dedicated productivity PC (which I'm using to craft this message), and a xbox 360 console. By using the PC as a prepro, I was able to remove the Yammy AVR and once I get the smaller case I mentioned previously, I'll recover a third more desktop space, not to mention increased simplicity in day to day operation.

As for drive storage for the games, I agree that 3.5" high capacity drives definitely offer the best bang for the buck. I'm just concerned about their physical size given the relatively small interior volume of the case. I'm not sure it will take two SSDs and two 3.5" drives simultaneously. As the number of games stored increases, my desire to back them up will commensurately increase. A thought just occurred to me: I have a home built NAS with 24TB of soft-RAID protected capacity available that I built for bluray rips, and it has plenty of space available. What if I backed the games up to it? I don't recall if the Windows 7 backup applet allows backups to network shares but I can find out easy enough. If Windows won't allow it perhaps the Steam Mover app you mentioned will?
post #131 of 429
So you want to have one SSD for your OS and the other to backup the OS?

I can see that being a good strategy but personally it seems like a bit of a waste to me to be perfectly honest.

I would either Pool the 2 SSD or run them in RAID 0( the pooling will give you a bit more security while the Raid will give you faster loads)

Then get a large HDD like Marafice suggested and use that to backup your OS for system restores. Sure it will take a bit longer but how often are you actually restoring your computer?

Also with the price of RAM right now you can go with an even higher amount if your motherboard supports it and then create a RAMdisk for some of the small things to run like Rainmeter. I find that such small apps run quite well that way.

I cant recall exactly but I think I read or someone told me that they had Steam installed on a RAMdisk and then they had all their games on an SSD so that Steam would start rapidly once the computer was turned on. However I never noticed it starting from an SSD to be an issue.
post #132 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marafice Eye View Post

For a PSU, look at the Seasonic X series, PC Power and Cooling's Silencer series, Be Quiet! also makes really good quiet PSUs, but with all you'll be paying a premium.

Do yourself a favor and just buy a 3TB mechanical, they're about $120 or less these days, and you'll be set for games and anything else you want to put on it. And at the price, 2 of them would be relatively cheap.

the 760 will work fine in PCI-e 2.0, not having 3.0 isn't a big deal at all, I wouldn't worry about it.

Thanks for the PS suggestions. I used a Seasonic fanless for a prior HTPC build and really liked it. So I'll take a look at their supplies first (hopefully with temp controlled fan spin control).
post #133 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimeran View Post

So you want to have one SSD for your OS and the other to backup the OS?

I can see that being a good strategy but personally it seems like a bit of a waste to me to be perfectly honest.

I would either Pool the 2 SSD or run them in RAID 0( the pooling will give you a bit more security while the Raid will give you faster loads)

Then get a large HDD like Marafice suggested and use that to backup your OS for system restores. Sure it will take a bit longer but how often are you actually restoring your computer?

Also with the price of RAM right now you can go with an even higher amount if your motherboard supports it and then create a RAMdisk for some of the small things to run like Rainmeter. I find that such small apps run quite well that way.

I cant recall exactly but I think I read or someone told me that they had Steam installed on a RAMdisk and then they had all their games on an SSD so that Steam would start rapidly once the computer was turned on. However I never noticed it starting from an SSD to be an issue.

How would pooling the 2 SSDs or using RAID 0 provide security? (in terms of fault tolerance which is my goal). Though a RAID 0 setup should provide improved performance as you suggested via stripping, it provides no fault tolerance. If one of the two drives fails in RAID 0 you loose access to all data. RAID 1 (mirror) would provide desirable, seamless high availability but when I set it up in the past via WHS for my first DIY NAS (perhaps Win7 is better in this regard but I haven't tried it) it proved to be a PITA to set up and once it was, the RAID driver started reporting false positive system drive failures. Simply put, RAID 1 proved to be more trouble than it was worth. With system image backups I can do a fresh install with full configuration no more than 24 hours old in 20 minutes. This is perfectly acceptable to me. On a related note, even if I wanted to switch to a RAID setup involving my current system drive I'm pretty sure I would have to wipe my current, perfectly functional configuration via RAID setup in the BIOS. Why would I want to do that? Why not simply move the existing system drive and it's spare to the new case and add a larger hardrive for games?

With regard to RAMdisks, Steam (which I've never tried but certainly will once my new box is operational), and game storage on SSD, assuming Steam runs as a local app on my PC (someone correct me if I'm wrong about this) won't I get perfectly good performance running it from my system SSD? As for game storage via SSD, I looked into it and to get one even remotely large enough to store the number of games I think I'll acquire over time I'd be looking at ~500GB, which is more than I want to spend for game storage. I think storing the games on a larger magnetic drive makes more fiscal sense.
Edited by elockett - 11/12/13 at 9:01am
post #134 of 429
Storing games on the SSD, especially the large ones really helps with the load times.

My point was that RAID 0 give you performance but you risk more volatility

OR

Pool the drives with something like Drive Bender

I am only going off what I have read about Drive pooling because I have never done it myself, but set up one SSD as a "duplicate" drive and then you would basically have a backup running at all times but when you go to load things it will also increase load speeds slightly.

But like I said, I have no experience with this setup myself. I personally run a single SSD for Steam and OS with my large games/frequently played ones on the SSD and the rest on my HDD.

In the end you really need to find a setup that works best for you.
post #135 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimeran View Post

Storing games on the SSD, especially the large ones really helps with the load times.

My point was that RAID 0 give you performance but you risk more volatility

OR

Pool the drives with something like Drive Bender

I am only going off what I have read about Drive pooling because I have never done it myself, but set up one SSD as a "duplicate" drive and then you would basically have a backup running at all times but when you go to load things it will also increase load speeds slightly.

But like I said, I have no experience with this setup myself. I personally run a single SSD for Steam and OS with my large games/frequently played ones on the SSD and the rest on my HDD.

In the end you really need to find a setup that works best for you.

I do have experience with software pooling and RAID via Flexraid and I'm currently using both for data protection on my NAS. Are you confusing drive pooling with mirroring? Pooling combines two or more physical drives to form one large virtual drive (which nicely appears and functions like a physical drive to the OS), but provides no data protection. Mirroring requires two (ideally identically sized) drives, but unlike pooling would only result in a single virtual drive with the size of one the two drives you mirrored. Mirroring offers effective data protection but as I stated previously, I had a bad experience the last time I tried it via the BIOS during initial installation. With two drives, if I had to choose one or the other given my priorities for the system I would use mirror for fault tolerance as system drive availability is more important to me than drive size or speed. I know of Drive Bender and IMS it does support drive pooling and mirroring, but I'm not sure it supports doing so on system drives (Flexraid doesn't-at least it doesn't with it's F-RAID (snapshot) option).

I do like your idea of maybe copying my most frequently played games to the spare SSD, but they would have to be copies with the originals on the large magnetic disc because if the system drive failed and I had to install to the spare SSD, I'm not sure it would preserve any preexisting files on it during the restore process.
Edited by elockett - 11/12/13 at 9:39am
post #136 of 429
Ah makes sense, I had someone just last week that drive pooling was very safe because of it's duplication that it does and that if you lose a drive it will be ok still. I am still learning about the server side of things as I mainly go for simple and fast as I mainly build gaming systems.

another option for all out performance and security you can do is you can get this one Raid controller(I'll look for it but I cant recall the name at the moment) but you can use an SSD as basically a cache part of the RAID alignment and then have two large capacity HDD. Only issue with it is you cant use it for the OS. but if you use one SSD for the OS and then the other in that alignment you would have a pretty good setup.

I'll edit this post when I find the name of it...

Edit: found it already, here is a link to it:

http://www.highpoint-tech.com/USA_new/series_RocketCache3240X8.htm
post #137 of 429
Great link Kimeran. I'm going to really look into this. do they have a device for USB 3.0?
post #138 of 429
Hello Again,

I've ordered a new case, 8 GB of DDR3-1600 RAM, MS wireless xbox 360 wireless controller for windows, and a GTX-760 video card. In terms of storage I've decided to move my two 120GB SSDs to the new PC plus the existing Intel i5-2400 CPU and Asrock mobo so the only items that remain to buy are a power supply and 3.5" HDD for game storage. For the power supply, I've settled on Seasonic's X650 Gold. For the HDD, I'm leaning toward one of two options:

A 2TB drive with 8GB SSD cache: for $120 with promo

or

A standard 3TB drive for $110 today via promo (if I wait a few days it is likely another 3TB drive (brand TBD) will become available for $102 via 15% discount):

2TB should provide more than enough space for games for the foreseeable future, but do you think it is worth the slight price premium to get the improved performance from the built in SSD cache?

Eric
post #139 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by elockett View Post

Hello Again,

I've ordered a new case, 8 GB of DDR3-1600 RAM, MS wireless xbox 360 wireless controller for windows, and a GTX-760 video card. In terms of storage I've decided to move my two 120GB SSDs to the new PC plus the existing Intel i5-2400 CPU and Asrock mobo so the only items that remain to buy are a power supply and 3.5" HDD for game storage. For the power supply, I've settled on Seasonic's X650 Gold. For the HDD, I'm leaning toward one of two options:

A 2TB drive with 8GB SSD cache: for $120 with promo

or

A standard 3TB drive for $110 today via promo (if I wait a few days it is likely another 3TB drive (brand TBD) will become available for $102 via 15% discount):

2TB should provide more than enough space for games for the foreseeable future, but do you think it is worth the slight price premium to get the improved performance from the built in SSD cache?

Eric

This is just my personal opinion, but I would rather have the extra terabyte of space than the minor performance boost.

I have all of my games installed on a 3tb and the load times are still fairly fast. Enough that I don't complain.

If you're completely certain that 2tb is more than enough, then go for it. But I used to say the same thing about two 1tb drives. Now I have two 3tb drives lol
Edited by Marafice Eye - 11/13/13 at 12:44pm
post #140 of 429
Marafice is correct again, (I should add IMHO for the purists,) HTPC's by their very nature demand great amounts of storage. This is the realm of Home Theater / Gaming.
post #141 of 429
I would recommend the 3TB as well. If you are unhappy with the performance you can always add that Raid controller that I linked above that will use one of your SSD as Cache if you are unhappy with the performance.
post #142 of 429
Hi Guys,

I'm finalizing my PC build and have a couple of questions - I'm looking to squeeze a few dollars out of my costs and was wondering if there is any real difference between the following and if you would be kind enough to help describe the differences that would be fantastic -

1. Motherboard - ASRock Z87 Killer Motherboard vs. ASUS Maximus VI Gene Motherboard - $100 less for the ASRock
2. PSU - Seasonic XP-1000 Platinum 1000W Power Supply vs. Silverstone Strider 1000W Gold Evolution ST1000G vs.NZXT Hale90 V2 1000W 80 Plus Gold - $100 less for the Silverstone and $50 less for the NZXT.

I'm also looking at the following 2 cases - Corsair Carbide 400R Black Mid-Tower Case vs. NZXT H630 Case Matte Black the NZXT is $50 more but it also has a lot of sound insulation that will probably be appreciated in my theater room.

I am happy to pay the extra money if there is a difference in product capability or even if it's just a matter of quality. I'm hoping this PC will last a long time.

Many thanks

Scott
post #143 of 429
I have that version of the nzxt PSU except the 750 watt model. I've had zero problems, stays cool, and looks cool in white.
post #144 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squidjammer View Post

Hi Guys,

I'm finalizing my PC build and have a couple of questions - I'm looking to squeeze a few dollars out of my costs and was wondering if there is any real difference between the following and if you would be kind enough to help describe the differences that would be fantastic -

1. Motherboard - ASRock Z87 Killer Motherboard vs. ASUS Maximus VI Gene Motherboard - $100 less for the ASRock
2. PSU - Seasonic XP-1000 Platinum 1000W Power Supply vs. Silverstone Strider 1000W Gold Evolution ST1000G vs.NZXT Hale90 V2 1000W 80 Plus Gold - $100 less for the Silverstone and $50 less for the NZXT.

I'm also looking at the following 2 cases - Corsair Carbide 400R Black Mid-Tower Case vs. NZXT H630 Case Matte Black the NZXT is $50 more but it also has a lot of sound insulation that will probably be appreciated in my theater room.

I am happy to pay the extra money if there is a difference in product capability or even if it's just a matter of quality. I'm hoping this PC will last a long time.

Many thanks

Scott

ASRock is a subsidiary of ASUS, so you'll still get the good build quality. But if you want features, get the Maximus. I run the Maximus VI Gene myself, great board, well worth the price imo.

Seasonic is probably one of, if not THE best, PSU maker on the market currently. That being said, any of those PSUs are fine, and should give you no issues.

If sound is a concern, there are a few other sound dampening cases, I think Corsair makes one as well.
post #145 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marafice Eye View Post

ASRock is a subsidiary of ASUS, so you'll still get the good build quality. But if you want features, get the Maximus. I run the Maximus VI Gene myself, great board, well worth the price imo.

Seasonic is probably one of, if not THE best, PSU maker on the market currently. That being said, any of those PSUs are fine, and should give you no issues.

If sound is a concern, there are a few other sound dampening cases, I think Corsair makes one as well.

Thanks for the info, being very new to this are you able to explain what features the Maximus offers that the ASRock does not?

Also what exaclty should I be looking for in a case? Size doesn't worry me any specifications I should be on the look out for?

Scott
post #146 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squidjammer View Post

Thanks for the info, being very new to this are you able to explain what features the Maximus offers that the ASRock does not?

Also what exaclty should I be looking for in a case? Size doesn't worry me any specifications I should be on the look out for?

Scott

Well the Maximus boards are part of ASUS's Republic of Gamers brand, and generally use a little better components. Again, not to say ASRock isn't good, they're great and priced very well.

The Maximus has some nice features though. The SupremeFX audio though I don't think that matters much for you in a nice theater, Sonic Radar, more of a cute gimmick, but it's got some potential (google it for a demo of what it does). an mPCIe Combo socket in which you can put one of those 1.5" (or are they 1.8?) micro SSDs as a dedicated OS drive, and a wireless module, so they don't take up other valuable slots. It's got on board RAM Disk utilities, Prioritized LAN settings to ensure running games take bandwidth priority (doesn't make a huge diff really, but nice to have. It also has in BIOS SSD utilities that other boards do not have.

If none of that matters to you, then by all means get the ASRock and save a bit of cash. It may be biased but I feel the Gene is worth it, but I also overclock and game quite a bit (when I get around to it lol) so I like the extra features

As for what to look for in a case, it sounds like noise is a concern, so you'd want to look for cases designed to be as silent as possible, give yourself good airflow. Since size isn't an issue, find a nice mid-tower.

Here's a list of case recommendations from Silent PC Review
http://www.silentpcreview.com/article75-page5.html
post #147 of 429
Marafice:

What's the advantage of Ram disk versus an SSD? I know the former is virtual, while the latter is physical. But is there a big difference of one over the other. I have 3 1TB SATA drives in my build and was thinking about snagging AMD's Free Ram Disk offer for FX 8350, & 7800 & higher series GPU users. What are the pros and cons. Anyone else please chime in too.
post #148 of 429
RAM Disks are insanely quick, however the drawback is severe size limitations. It uses your RAM, so you;re very limited as most typical mother boards support a max of 32gb of RAM or 64gb. Second, you'd never use a RAM Disk for an OS, just doesn't work as in most cases, when you shut down, the disk is cleared. Now you can install a game, or something to a RAM disk, and then back it up for quick loading later, but still. ASUS has gone a step further and made it very easy to work with, and indeed NOT have a RAM disk clear itself after a reboot/shutdown.

Again. It's a cool feature, but in most cases, entirely impractical as you need a hefty chunk of RAM to take proper advantage of it.
post #149 of 429
Thanks for the insight Eye. Even though it really left me straddling the fence a little bit. On the one hand...if it makes gaming faster and more responsive...I'd sure like to tinker with it. But if it screws up everything else in my PC memory configuration...it could be a nightmare. Right now I only use 16 GB of Ram. So I think I will pass on it. The response was much appreciated.
post #150 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelbelly View Post

Thanks for the insight Eye. Even though it really left me straddling the fence a little bit. On the one hand...if it makes gaming faster and more responsive...I'd sure like to tinker with it. But if it screws up everything else in my PC memory configuration...it could be a nightmare. Right now I only use 16 GB of Ram. So I think I will pass on it. The response was much appreciated.

Yeah, it's one of those things where if you have 32 or 64gb of RAM, then sure play around with it. But most of us run 8 to 16gb so we really don't have too much extra to play with.
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