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The official AVS "PC Game Console" thread - Page 2

post #31 of 429
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Spamilton View Post

One question, most PC gamers swear by wired mice and keyboards for online gaming. While I've had no problems with any games - I've yet to really try games like Battlefield and COD on the PC. I use 2.4hz combo from the comfort of my couch ( PC's connected to the 60inch plasma in the living room / home theater ) - I wonder if it will be alright or will indeed be laggy for the aforementioned?

Yeah, there's lag and then there's lag. There are superhuman gamers out there that can feel every bit of delay no matter how small, but these are rare birds. I think most mortals can't feel the difference between wired and wireless controllers.

Now input lag on a TV - that's a different thing. Everyone should be able to feel the time difference between a button push/mouse move laggiest TV. Once you get beyond a couple frames of delay, we have problems.

Speaking of which, I'm currently shopping for a new gaming TV for my modest HT, and having a tough time finding one with 1) excellent PQ (good blacks, no clouding or flashlighting) for movies/TV, 2) 65" or above for the HT, and 3) excellent input lag for gaming. I want to avoid plasma because of fear of image retention and would prefer a brighter image, but almost every LED TV I've looked at fails one of the 3 points I mentioned. As far as I can tell, the Holy Grail of perfect large LED for gaming and movies doesn't exist.

So Sean - how are you liking your plasma for gaming? Ever have any IR issues?
post #32 of 429
This thread is full of win. I recently grew a pair and built my own PC and it's so nice to be able to DIY. I'm amazed at how easy it actually is to set it up. If you're thinking about buying a prebuilt because you're worried about it being to difficult, check out a youtube video on how to build a PC - it's super easy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bUghCx9iso

The above is the one I used. It did make it easier that I also used a fractal case. smile.gif



I saved a bunch of money because I used the blu ray player, PSU and hard drive from my old computer (eco-friendly?). I also used my old GPU, but I'm going to upgrade that soon.

I'm using the 360 controller with the wireless dongle (hate that word) and it works fantastic. Hell, even the rumble function works. I wasn't expecting that.

Finally, I can't believe how inexpensive some of the games can be when they go on sale on Steam. I get excited to go to the steam store to see what games are on sale. It really is so much better than console gaming, IMHO.
post #33 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaverJ View Post

Yeah, there's lag and then there's lag. There are superhuman gamers out there that can feel every bit of delay no matter how small, but these are rare birds. I think most mortals can't feel the difference between wired and wireless controllers.

Now input lag on a TV - that's a different thing. Everyone should be able to feel the time difference between a button push/mouse move laggiest TV. Once you get beyond a couple frames of delay, we have problems.

Speaking of which, I'm currently shopping for a new gaming TV for my modest HT, and having a tough time finding one with 1) excellent PQ (good blacks, no clouding or flashlighting) for movies/TV, 2) 65" or above for the HT, and 3) excellent input lag for gaming. I want to avoid plasma because of fear of image retention and would prefer a brighter image, but almost every LED TV I've looked at fails one of the 3 points I mentioned. As far as I can tell, the Holy Grail of perfect large LED for gaming and movies doesn't exist.

So Sean - how are you liking your plasma for gaming? Ever have any IR issues?

Yup - but not from games, and it only happened once. Actually screen burn not image retention. When I first got it I think I had it set to " dynamic " ( WAY to much contrast on that setting, way to easy to burn in ) - and for the first couple of weeks used chrome with it's usual skin. The Address bar ( the bright white part ) burnt right across the top of my screen. I discovered it about 3 weeks after I bought the thing last year. Just about sh#t my pants. In any case I switched to firefox with a dark skin and black browser bar, and haven't had any trouble since than. Unfortunately on bright white scenes you can still see the burn in after hundreds of hours of movies / game play, but it's still from chrome.
Long story short - use a screen saver. Unfortunately for some reason on windows 8 the screen saver decides for itself when it wants to work. It doesn't seem to work for the metro screen, and I can only imagine the burn in from all those squares if I forgot about it and went to work - so you have to be careful. As far as motition blur for games etc, my particular model anyways, it's non existent. Samsung PN60E530 Plasma. Image quality is EXCELLENT as well - and I haven't noticed input lag per say either. But again, screen burn in is a bitch so you have to be careful.
Edited by Sean Spamilton - 11/2/13 at 8:35am
post #34 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

Modern wireless mice/kb have as much lag as wireless controllers, almost imperceptible.  I'm sure it's theoretically a bit of lag, but nothing to be concerned over. The bigger issue is range, the quoted specs can be very optimistic.  

I also started getting back into PC hardcore about a year ago.  Initially I built a smallish machine that I would literally carry from my office to my theater, but that was kind of a PITA.  Eventually I bought super long HDMI and USB cables, and now I've got it permanently connected to both, which is soooo much more convenient. I'm looking forward to some sort of streaming solution to close the loop and give me an easy way to pipe it to my living room, but at that point I'm prob going to go all out and build a full/mid-tower super rig that can serve multiple rooms with ease. And man, I really wanna try that steam controller. 

Yeah the steam controller looks good. It would certainly be convenient to use - I would prefer it over the XBOX controllers anyways ( can't stand their feel ).

PS - have you tried PATH OF EXILE out yet? I was reading a bit of the faq yesterday, about it's " ethical microtransactions " - anything you can buy is only cosmetic for your character, you can't buy things to improve hit points or skills etc - I think you said you were concerned about that.
post #35 of 429

Nah, never did try it. Might as well download it and see what it's about if the transactions arent too ugly.

post #36 of 429

Gave path of exile a shot....pretty cool. Seems super slow paced compared to diablo or torchlight though, but great graphics.

post #37 of 429
Yeah I have it installed, played like 30 min, got brain fried when I looked at the skill tree lol
post #38 of 429
I have a xbox one bought and paid for with four games. Waiting for the launch I've had a lot of time to think about it and might pull my money back and by a PC for gaming only. I've been a console gamer my whole life so it's hard for me to do. I was looking at the Alienware X51 PC on bestbuys web site and costs $1000. It has a nvidia GeForce gt645 graphics card, 1tb sata @7200, i7 fourth gen and so on. How does this PC stack up next to the x1 and ps4performance wise? How future proof is it? Does steam work like a console dash board? Also I'm using it with a Panasonic 65" vt50 and a denon receiver it would be running through if that makes a difference. Aside from set up would I have to use the mouse and key board on a regular basis? Thanks in advance!!
post #39 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

I have a xbox one bought and paid for with four games. Waiting for the launch I've had a lot of time to think about it and might pull my money back and by a PC for gaming only. I've been a console gamer my whole life so it's hard for me to do. I was looking at the Alienware X51 PC on bestbuys web site and costs $1000. It has a nvidia GeForce gt645 graphics card, 1tb sata @7200, i7 fourth gen and so on. How does this PC stack up next to the x1 and ps4performance wise? How future proof is it? Does steam work like a console dash board? Also I'm using it with a Panasonic 65" vt50 and a denon receiver it would be running through if that makes a difference. Aside from set up would I have to use the mouse and key board on a regular basis? Thanks in advance!!

The GT645 is honestly an awful card. It's an OEM only card, has terribly low specs for today's standards. Take a look at the 2nd post. Have a look at the Mid-Range example build to see what you can get for around $1000. A build like that will destroy the Alienware X51.

The problem with pre-builts is you're paying for the name, and an outrageous amount for the labor. A similarly spec'd custom build to that X51 would be around $700 tops.

Wow, they don't tell you WHICH Haswell chip is in it, they just say 4th Gen Intel at 3.4Ghz. That can be any one of four CPUS from an i3 to an i7.

EDIT: Had to look it up elsewhere, and wow. no dude, avoid that X51 and build one yourself. that's an i5-4440 in it. With those specs, you won't be future proofed, at all. The processor is decent at best, and that video card is terrible.
Edited by Marafice Eye - 11/2/13 at 1:11pm
post #40 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

I have a xbox one bought and paid for with four games. Waiting for the launch I've had a lot of time to think about it and might pull my money back and by a PC for gaming only. I've been a console gamer my whole life so it's hard for me to do. I was looking at the Alienware X51 PC on bestbuys web site and costs $1000. It has a nvidia GeForce gt645 graphics card, 1tb sata @7200, i7 fourth gen and so on. How does this PC stack up next to the x1 and ps4performance wise? How future proof is it? Does steam work like a console dash board? Also I'm using it with a Panasonic 65" vt50 and a denon receiver it would be running through if that makes a difference. Aside from set up would I have to use the mouse and key board on a regular basis? Thanks in advance!!

I'm sure smarter others on hardware will wade in and help you with your decision. So I will give some really simple advice. Since you are looking at Best Buy...I suggest you plan to spend a few hours in one, just playing some simple free games on Steam. They will set you up on a PC. Connect to Steam interface, so you can see what it looks like. And try it with several devices (mouse/keyboard/controller). And since they will give you all of that service for free...I suggest you buy all of the parts elsewhere (parts supplier like Micro Center Newegg & etc). Buy all of the software and support programs from Best Buy. And let Geek Squad put it all together for you for their fee. They will be happy with the software/support side of the business. They'll optimize your system to your level of experience. And you'll be happier long term with their tech support backup. I am assuming that since you are considering the Alienware system...you don't want to build it yourself. My felling on the Next Generation consoles and the Alienware X51, is that you can soundly beat both with less expensive parts from 2011-2013 PC computer Parts tech. And I am assuming you'd be buying the Parts on deals, closeouts with warranty and etc.

Guys on this thread will even help you spec the build with recommendations for the Geeksters to assemble & debug for you.
post #41 of 429
Here's a quick build I threw together for you LETH2AL.

$1000~, HTPC form-factor, and heaps better than that X51.

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/1WsfA

i5-4670K
GTX760
520w PSU
low-profile CPU cooler
3TB hard drive
Win 8.1
and a Blu-Ray burner/reader

You can always drop the after market cooler to save $43 too, the stock one would be fine unless you would decide to overclock at all.
post #42 of 429
Thanks guys, I'm going to look some of that up. And yes I definitely can't build it myself. That's what scares me about making the switch, I don't know a whole lot about pc.
post #43 of 429
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

I have a xbox one bought and paid for with four games. Waiting for the launch I've had a lot of time to think about it and might pull my money back and by a PC for gaming only. I've been a console gamer my whole life so it's hard for me to do. I was looking at the Alienware X51 PC on bestbuys web site and costs $1000. It has a nvidia GeForce gt645 graphics card, 1tb sata @7200, i7 fourth gen and so on. How does this PC stack up next to the x1 and ps4performance wise? How future proof is it? Does steam work like a console dash board? Also I'm using it with a Panasonic 65" vt50 and a denon receiver it would be running through if that makes a difference. Aside from set up would I have to use the mouse and key board on a regular basis? Thanks in advance!!

I will say that X51 does have a nice "console-like" case. Eye and Barrel gave some great advice, but I understand the allure of that Alienware - everything installed without hassle, resembles a console and it's better than a xbox360 and PS3. But in terms of going against PS4 and Xbox One, hmmmmm... tough to say on that without some benchmarks to go by.

So the question is how much does aesthetics matter? Also, are you adverse to assembling one yourself, and would a basic PC tower bug you? These are questions only you can answer based on what is important to you. But the popular suggestion around here will be to consider buying the parts and building it yourself - it's a little scarey, but exciting and fun. If you take it slow, watch some videos on YouTube to prepare yourself, you can be up and running within a couple hours. And once it's done, feel more connected to what you just built.

As for your last question about Steam - if you set it up to load when Windows loads and you have an xbox controller, all you have to do is press and hold the center X button and Steam launches in Big Picture Mode, which is a console-like dashboard - very TV and gamepad friendly. It looks like this:







You still might need the mouse and keyboard at times if you load a game that doesn't fully support gamepad, or if something happens that takes you out of big picture mode - for example, for some reason my PC like to minimize the game I'm playing unexpectedly. It happens very rarely, maybe once a month or something, and I'm not sure why - some Windows process that briefly takes over? Anyway, I need to click back to the game with the mouse to continue playing.

So PC gaming isn't totally mouse/keyboard free yet, but it can come close if you make an effort. If this is an issue, you might want to wait a bit to see what the SteamBox will be all about.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

Thanks guys, I'm going to look some of that up. And yes I definitely can't build it myself. That's what scares me about making the switch, I don't know a whole lot about pc.

You are exactly who this thread is for! smile.gif We are here for you - subscribe and feel free to ask us anything.
post #44 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

Thanks guys, I'm going to look some of that up. And yes I definitely can't build it myself. That's what scares me about making the switch, I don't know a whole lot about pc.

BlasterMaster posted an excellent YouTube vid on building a computer. It's nowhere near as daunting as people think it can be. Now custom-loop watercooling? Sure, i don't even trust myself with that. But it is actually quite hard to mess up the basic building of a PC these days.

And @Daver, that's why I included that Silverstone Milo case in that build link. Fits perfectly with the HT decor, looks just like a component you'd see.
post #45 of 429
What is steam box?
post #46 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

What is steam box?

Well I thnk it's offical called Steam Machines now. Valve is in the process of making their own branded hardware boxes. Just like Alienware, Falcon Northwest, etc. I'd like to think they'd be cheaper than the competitors, but somehow I doubt it.

However, Steam Machines is still not even in a hardware beta yet, so it would be next year at the earliest before we'd see a retail release.

I also trust Valve to put far better hardware in their Steam Machines than Alienware does.
post #47 of 429
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

What is steam box?

Valve is launching living room boxes based on their Steam software and a new controller they have developed, planned for sometime in 2014. Valve has a lot of money and resources invested in this, and are about to go into a huge beta, so this could be a good thing.

The controller is planned to look something like this:



..but it's all open source, so I believe you don't need to use their controller if you would rather use a 360 controller. Someone correct me if I'm wrong on this.

EDIT: ninja-ed by Eye! smile.gif I didn't realize it changed to "Machines" - I'll update the Q&A.
Edited by DaverJ - 11/2/13 at 2:40pm
post #48 of 429
One of the reasons I want to switch is to be able to upgrade with the games rather than be locked into the same hardware for such a long time, plus more games to play. Are pre built systems like that typically upgradable?
post #49 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

One of the reasons I want to switch is to be able to upgrade with the games rather than be locked into the same hardware for such a long time, plus more games to play. Are pre built systems like that typically upgradable?

A lot of the time, no, they aren't. Or if they are, their special form-factor makes it a major pain in the butt to do it.

The issue stems mainly from special OEM parts. You don't know what motherboard is inside, so you can never be 100% certain of compatibility. And the other major issue is you can never be certain of build quality because you don't know who provided the parts on the inside.
Edited by Marafice Eye - 11/2/13 at 2:40pm
post #50 of 429
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

One of the reasons I want to switch is to be able to upgrade with the games rather than be locked into the same hardware for such a long time, plus more games to play. Are pre built systems like that typically upgradable?

I would say that Alienware is probably not very upgradable. In order to save space, it's not going to have an off-the-shelf power supply, which they sometimes soldier in. I have a feeling you will be somewhat locked in to that hardware configuration if you get that system.

There are places that use off-the-shelf parts and configure it for you. I haven't used any of these, but places like CyberPowerPC and IBuyPower would have more upgradable PCs.

Does anyone have any suggestions for a reputable builder like one of those that build a solid, upgradable gaming PC?
post #51 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

One of the reasons I want to switch is to be able to upgrade with the games rather than be locked into the same hardware for such a long time, plus more games to play. Are pre built systems like that typically upgradable?

Yes. But with some limitations and constraints. A lot of changes...like SLI or Cross Firing GPUs add more demands on a system. Such as needs for more space, cooling, power etc. So some changes that seem small until you get into it...can cascade into very big if you don't discipline yourself to focus on exactly what you are trying to achieve. And are 100% sure you will recognize it and appreciate it once you make the change. Some games are extremely demanding...and can be resource hogs. But they also can be enjoyed at lower settings...or simple changes. So try to find that right balance between quality manufacturing, operation flexibility and price.
post #52 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaverJ View Post

I would say that Alienware is probably not very upgradable. In order to save space, it's not going to have an off-the-shelf power supply, which they sometimes soldier in. I have a feeling you will be somewhat locked in to that hardware configuration if you get that system.

There are places that use off-the-shelf parts and configure it for you. I haven't used any of these, but places like CyberPowerPC and IBuyPower would have more upgradable PCs.

Does anyone have any suggestions for a reputable builder like one of those that build a solid, upgradable gaming PC?

The power supply is external on the x51. People were putting 670s or 760s in them last I saw. Depending on the model they come with either a 240 or 330 watt power supply. You definitely end up paying a hefty premium for the form factor.

I purchased an Alienware Aurora desktop around May. It's just a desktop and it can be upgraded any way you want. I purchased it from Dell Outlet with a 30% off coupon, plus govt discount and no tax, and I had money in gift cards from a laptop purchase. It ended up being cheaper than I could have built it for so I went for it. It came with a Sandy Bridge E cpu, 16gb of Ram, liquid cooling and good air flow, and a 680 for not much more than the price of the cpu and gpu alone. It came looking and behaving brand new. Maybe keep an eye on the Dell Outlet twitter feed for a good deal. Otherwise, building your own really isn't difficult if you follow a parts plan. It's like putting legos together.

I played games on pc when I was younger from Commander Keen to Quake over a t1, but I stopped for about 10 years. Now that I have one again, I don't feel the need to get the new consoles. Going through your first Steam sale and building a massive library(50+ games) for the price of a couple of console games is amazing. Playing a game like Crysis 3 on max settings on a 10 ft wide screen is a sight to behold. It's also great knowing that your library can grow with you and you aren't locked into a specific piece of hardware or losing a library of games from the past 8 years when you upgrade.
Edited by Monger - 11/2/13 at 4:48pm
post #53 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaverJ View Post

I would say that Alienware is probably not very upgradable. In order to save space, it's not going to have an off-the-shelf power supply, which they sometimes soldier in. I have a feeling you will be somewhat locked in to that hardware configuration if you get that system.

There are places that use off-the-shelf parts and configure it for you. I haven't used any of these, but places like CyberPowerPC and IBuyPower would have more upgradable PCs.

Does anyone have any suggestions for a reputable builder like one of those that build a solid, upgradable gaming PC?

Well reputable is one thing. Recommendable is another.

If the only option is pre-built, I would say something like CyberPower or IBuyPower since they would be a shade lower in price than others. BUt I can't say I would strongly recommend any of them.

One thing you could do is check around town where you live for a computer repair/build shop that's NOT part of a big chain like Best Buy etc. See what they can offer you for $1000 and then do some comparisons.

Heck compare the online builders too, sometimes the parts you can get for your budget vary wildly from builder to builder.

I will say 100% that I do NOT recommend Alienware, AT ALL. Just avoid them all together
post #54 of 429
I would stick with Best Buy and their annual Service plan. Because they stand behind their work. And they will install part upgrades on a recurring within their plan. This is especially important for a person who has never built a computer before. BBs in-store hardware is boilerplate MEH. But Geek Squad is very good at optimizing the software with hardware...File setups and transfers...Internet security...Boot optimization and MOBO optimization. A neophyte could be very intimidated by that process. We all take it for granted. But to a person who has never done it?...it could seem like Trigonometry. Especially when the inevitable glitches...blue screens ...and "Fatal shutdown Errors" popup. Plus they demo the work they have done and explain it to the customer. How do I adjust the clock on the GPU? They will explain it to him. IMO that is the most important investment in the system, if one isn't going to do the heavy lifting themselves. I say if one is not inclined to do this kind of stuff...but enjoy using it. Let BB do the math. Especially since the op was going to buy the Alienware console from them anyway.
post #55 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelbelly View Post

I would stick with Best Buy and their annual Service plan. Because they stand behind their work. And they will install part upgrades on a recurring within their plan. This is especially important for a person who has never built a computer before. BBs in-store hardware is boilerplate MEH. But Geek Squad is very good at optimizing the software with hardware...File setups and transfers...Internet security...Boot optimization and MOBO optimization. A neophyte could be very intimidated by that process. We all take it for granted. But to a person who has never done it?...it could seem like Trigonometry. Especially when the inevitable glitches...blue screens ...and "Fatal shutdown Errors" popup. Plus they demo the work they have done and explain it to the customer. How do I adjust the clock on the GPU? They will explain it to him. IMO that is the most important investment in the system, if one isn't going to do the heavy lifting themselves. I say if one is not inclined to do this kind of stuff...but enjoy using it. Let BB do the math. Especially since the op was going to buy the Alienware console from them anyway.

I would not. I've worked for Best Buy twice, and I've seen how the receiving department handles computer components. I will NEVER buy any pc part from Best Buy, let alone let them use those parts in my PC. You ever seen a $500+ video card get thrown like a frisbee down the length of a truck, smacking the wall and then the ground? Then see it get put on the shelf for someone to buy?

I'm not saying all stores are like that and it probably happens everywhere, but I've seen it first hand in Best Buy, so I will NEVER recommend getting parts from them.

Should you choose to go to Best Buy, take EVERYTHING the sales person says with a grain of salt, 90% of them have no idea what they're talking about and are just trying to sell you the most expensive thing they can get you to buy. (This is why I was let go, I didn't push useless crap on people that didn't need it lol)

As for keeping it running smoothly and doing tweaking, I'd trust forum members here, or on OCN, or Tom's Hardware, Guru3D, TPU, etc, to help with that over someone at Best Buy.
Edited by Marafice Eye - 11/2/13 at 7:29pm
post #56 of 429
Quote:
Thanks guys, I'm going to look some of that up. And yes I definitely can't build it myself. That's what scares me about making the switch, I don't know a whole lot about pc.

Yes, you can! Watch the video I linked. Heck, use the same case and motherboard they used if it will help you or buy one like I have by the same company (I think it looks really nice).

I hadn't done any pc building before and I just had my wife's laptop with me and that video running, pausing, going back, etc. as I needed to. Other thing, is that some dude mentioned that, instead of using a static wrist strap, to use some speaker wire and hook it up to your metal watch strap (assuming you have one). Saves only $5, but hey that's a Steam game on sale!
post #57 of 429
If its too daunting for you to consider doing it yourself, you could always research the parts you want, buy them, and pay someone to throw it together for you. Even if it cost you 100 dollars, you'd save a TON buying the parts yourself. Researching is half the fun of the new build anyways! And if someone asks you what kind of pc you have, you can tell them proudly its a custom build you decided on yourself.
post #58 of 429
Thanks again guys! I'm going to do some more research and decide what I want to do. I'm sure I'll be back really soon with some more questions. I'm glad I asked on this forum, I was seriously considering buying that Alienware.
post #59 of 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by LETH2AL View Post

Thanks again guys! I'm going to do some more research and decide what I want to do. I'm sure I'll be back really soon with some more questions. I'm glad I asked on this forum, I was seriously considering buying that Alienware.

That's what this thread is for!, Glad to be of service. I'll do some looking around at pre-builts, if you're really set on one, to see what I can find in that $1000 range.
post #60 of 429
I've posted this before, but for those who don't want to learn to build their own PC but don't like the pre-built options out there, give mWave a try. For anything you order from their site, they will assemble and test it for you for $80. Your new rig will be ready to ship in about a week. Here is a summary of what the money pays for:

Quote:
Assembly & Testing checklist performed by Mwave:

  • Assemble purchased motherboard, CPU, CPU fan (STOCK), and RAM/memory.
  • Update purchased motherboard�s BIOS. (If needed)
  • Check motherboard reading of memory capacity.
  • Check for normal temperature reading in BIOS settings.
  • Ensure motherboard is correctly reading CPU/processor in BIOS settings.
  • Run Memtest to scan for errors in manufacturing.
  • Install and secure motherboard bundle inside purchased PC case.
  • Install and secure purchased power supply to connect to system.
  • Complete installation of optical drives in PC case. (If purchased)
  • Install system hard drive(s). (If purchased)
  • Install system video cards (If purchased)
  • Tie off all wiring to aid with ventilation and spacing.
  • Install purchased Operating System.
  • Install drivers for purchased Motherboard. (chipset, audio, LAN, and others)
  • Install the drivers for video card and other devices. (drivers and software)
  • Check the system for errors, bugs, and physical defects (CPU, graphics, and memory will be stressed looking for errors).
  • If a incorrect item is purchased that will not work in the system, the customer will be notified to solve the issue with either replacing the item with one that will work, or removing it from the order completely.
  • Test optical drive(s) for reading and writing capabilities.
  • Burn-in test for 24-48 hours. (Benchmark)
  • Send out system fully assembled; ready to plug in and put to use.
  • Final re-inspection of fully assembled product.
  • Safely pack up system neatly, if needed we will include padding INSIDE system to prevent damage during transit. (if needed)

While they have a wide selection of components to choose from, what if you don't see the video card you want? Well, order anything except the video card and they will still assemble and test what you did order. You can then get the video card you want from somewhere else and manually install it yourself (which is not difficult at all).

I used this about a decade ago and everything came to me in perfect condition. Of course I've learned since then that building it yourself is by far the way to go (it helps you learn to diagnose you own problems down the line, too), but this is a still good option for some people out there.
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