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Blockbuster to Close Remaining Stores and End Disc By Mail - Page 5

post #121 of 185
Make clear city and state, let's try and get all remaining 300 in thus thread captured in photos......


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post #122 of 185
I don't think I can add much more that hasn't already been said, but I feel compelled to offer my "two cents" anyway...

Blockbuster closed their doors for good here in Canada a while ago but I have to admit I am surprised that the U.S. stores have followed suit this soon afterwards. To me it is sad in a way to see them go speaking as someone who remembers renting Beta VCR movies back in the 80's from Sears and several little independent rental shops which were located pretty much anywhere and everywhere. Even more significantly, I see the disappearance of video stores in general as a blow to physical media. I'm not against streaming movies at all, in fact many movies are the kind you might only want to see once in your life, but I have to admit that I like physical media and have many DVD and Blu-ray movies.

This makes me wonder about the health of stores such as HMV here in Canada...
post #123 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by brakel View Post

In those early years it always seemed like they made business decisions with only the next quarterly fiscal report in mind rather than long term decisions.
That's been the downfall of many a business over the decades.

Once your business is being run by the stock holders and not by people that actually know what they're doing, it's pretty much the beginning of the end.

Going public is probably the worst thing any company can do for long term existence. At that point, the company leaves the hands of the innovators who started it and it becomes a machine designed to generate increased profit no matter how it guts the company of its original purpose.

At that point, what is good for creating customer demand goes out the window and it becomes all about the bottom line or gaining advertisers. That leads to questionable products and customer data polices that are about finding ways to monetize customers rather that create demand for new products and services.

When a company goes public, the following occurs:

1 - Products start being sold based on market research of current desires instead of an unmet need. This reduces innovation by merely creating "me too" products.
2 - Once innovative products are no longer being pursued, R&D is cut from the budget.
3 - Eventually, demand for "more of the same" dries up and revenue drops. In order to still increase the next quarterly profits, drastic staffing cuts are made, starting at the bottom.
4 - Because the staffing cuts allowed the company to show a profit that year, huge bonuses are given to the upper management for the great job they did.
5 - The next fiscal year, the goal becomes making the company even leaner. Several new vice presidents are hired to oversee several key operations and find ways to cut expenses. They universally agree that the manufacturing sectors are costing too much and the company could save $1.00 a unit by sending the products to China to be manufactured.
6 - Due to volume, this results in millions of saved dollars. The upper management (including the new vice presidents) all gets big bonuses.
7 - Because job cuts have occurred all across the manufacturing sector, unemployment numbers have resulted in a slowed retail market. As sales stagnate, fuel costs go up and Chinese workers demand more money, more domestic job cuts occur to allow profits to continue to rise, despite lack of revenue. At this point, the employee chart looks less like a pyramid and more like a pear - almost as wide at the top as it is at the bottom.
8 - Sales continue to lag and the company has run out of places to cut back on various divisions. At this point, several divisions are cut, resulting in a few VP's being released with large severance packages. Meanwhile, the company files for bankruptcy, allowing them to avoid paying severance to the regular employees and avoid paying its bills to creditors.

At this point, the company does one of 3 things:

1 - The company restructures under a new identity and new business model, usually as a "service consultant". At this point, they make nothing. They only provide technical support using some folks in India (IBM, XEROX, etc).
2 - They are bought by a broker who throws up a web site using the old name, but it's really just one big conglomerate selling the exact same merchandise under several failed names (CompUSA, Tiger Direct, Circuit City).
3 - They're bought by another company that fails to find a way to make it a success and ends up shutting it down anyway (any company purchased by Yahoo).
Edited by NetworkTV - 11/10/13 at 11:01pm
post #124 of 185
Very interesting NetworkTV.
post #125 of 185
With the exception of my Laserdisc rental store, I never liked going to a video rental store. You had to go out of your way to get to the store, the new releases were always rented, and you had to deal with the clowns behind the counter. Once DVDs and Netflix showed up, I never set foot in a rental store. It was the perfect solution for me. I don't mind the waiting for the mail turnaround because I always watch movies on the weekend and send them back on Monday. A new set of movies show up Wednesday or Thursday. When everyone was scared away with the Netflix price increase, I just dropped the number of discs I could rent at a time to keep the same cost each month.

Perhaps I should care about losing companies that rent physical discs. As each one goes out of business, it gets us one step closer to a world without physical disc rentals.
post #126 of 185
People all over the Internet lauding over a US company going out of business and all the lost jobs and wages as payback for a $5 late fee they paid for returning a movie late in 1999.
post #127 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJPDC View Post

People all over the Internet lauding over a US company going out of business and all the lost jobs and wages as payback for a $5 late fee they paid for returning a movie late in 1999.

I don't think that the jobs Blockbuster provided qualified as skilled labor, so it's really not a big deal. The last thing any nation's economy needs are a bunch of obsolete, inefficient corporations that stick around after technology has allowed society to move on to what's next.

post #128 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimeran View Post

I rent most of my movies from DirecTV Cinema....but if I like the movie enough I go buy a Bluray...I dont buy digital movies or music....

But you do buy digital music and movies.  :) What you won't buy into is online delivery of digital movies and music.

I've found that new releases on Vudu are cinematic-quality, even when I use my projector and view from 1.2X diagonal distance (THX recommended). Also, SuperHD streaming from Netflix is nearly perfect when it comes to older titles. I've seen numerous Blu-rays that look worse, due to sloppy mastering.

Online delivery keeps getting better. IMO, at its best it's already past the point where image quality is the deciding factor. The best quality streams are for high budget new releases.

 

I say this having performed numerous Blu-ray vs. online delivery comparisons, and having recently seen the "best of the best" in display technology at CEDIA 2013 as well as numerous other venues.

The main difference IMO is one of perception. Poor image quality with Blu-ray is viewed as an exception. Poor image quality with online delivery is seen as proof the format is inferior to Blu-ray.

Granted, I have yet to see Vudu or iTunes actually beat Blu-ray's image quality. However I have seen Vudu HDX streams effectively match Blu-ray image quality on many occasions, and when watching movies it is simply not an issue—you only see a difference when pixel-peeping still frames.

post #129 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

I don't think that the jobs Blockbuster provided qualified as skilled labor, so it's really not a big deal. The last thing any nation's economy needs are a bunch of obsolete, inefficient corporations that stick around after technology has allowed society to move on to what's next.

Your late fee must have been $7.50
post #130 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJPDC View Post


Your late fee must have been $7.50

True story. Back in the early 90's I forgot to return "Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown" in the course of moving and changing phone numbers. I was reminded of that when I was arrested by two detectives and charged with larceny—$1500—which was the value the store attached to the "stolen" video cassette.

I returned the movie (escorted by the detectives), paid a fine and the charges were dropped—but not before I was fingerprinted and spent a few hours in a jail cell.


Edited by imagic - 11/11/13 at 7:47am
post #131 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

But you do buy digital music and movies.  smile.gif  What you won't buy into is online delivery of digital movies and music.


I've found that new releases on Vudu are cinematic-quality, even when I use my projector and view from 1.2X diagonal distance (THX recommended). Also, SuperHD streaming from Netflix is nearly perfect when it comes to older titles. I've seen numerous Blu-rays that look worse, due to sloppy mastering.


Online delivery keeps getting better. IMO, at its best it's already past the point where image quality is the deciding factor. The best quality streams are for high budget new releases.

I say this having performed numerous Blu-ray vs. online delivery comparisons, and having recently seen the "best of the best" in display technology at CEDIA 2013 as well as numerous other venues.


The main difference IMO is one of perception. Poor image quality with Blu-ray is viewed as an exception. Poor image quality with online delivery is seen as proof the format is inferior to Blu-ray.


Granted, I have yet to see Vudu or iTunes actually beat Blu-ray's image quality. However I have seen Vudu HDX streams effectively match Blu-ray image quality on many occasions, and when watching movies it is simply not an issue—you only see a difference when pixel-peeping still frames.

Good point, I guess the better way to phrase that is that I rent digital media but I dont own my movies digitally.

My biggest issue with digital ownership is that I dont feel like it is safe enough. If I buy a movie from Amazon for instance for download will they keep record of the movies I have purchased? How do I know that their servers wont get hacked and and someone steal my digital movies and Amazon in return cancels my account? What happens if something happens to my account at all....I just have too many questions in regard to it...

I also dont like that the audio usually takes a hit. The picture quality matters to me, but not as much as the audio. The reason I will pay the extra amount to rent from DirecTV Cinema is the fact that most of the movies come through with 1080p and 5.1 surround sound....and I dont use it every month so I actually save compared to how much I originally was spending Netflix when they increased the price.

I am not against digital media though, all of my videogames are digitally owned(Steam).

I am just not comfortable yet with the idea of putting my ownership into someone elses hands.

Sorry, this post is a little off topic.
post #132 of 185
Sad day. Any time a source of higher quality movies is snuffed out, our choice is further limited. It happened with music, (thanks Apple), now it's happening with movies. It's part of a general dumbing down of society, where convenience and price trump quality every time. Nobody wants to pay for anything, and the vast majority don't care that listening to low quality MP3s on cheap earbuds is a poor experience, or that a streamed movie doesn't have the best audio, or even the best picture. It's like an all-you-can-eat buffet - "just give me easy access to LOTS of mediocre food, and make it cheap". The Netflix streaming service is great, I use it all the time, but it doesn't have a good selection of new releases, nor even a very substantial back catalog. Lower quality audio, pretty good picture, no special features, hit-or-miss selection. A really good mail order service would be fine, but I still miss the trip to the video store.
post #133 of 185
So sad. My childhood is full of memories of renting videos on weekends. Those were magical nights when Mom and Dad would take us, and we would ravage aimlessly through the entire store trying to find that one special video (or game) we could take home with us. There is something nostalgic about going to the video stores back then, and not just the Blockbusters and Hollywood Videos, but the numerous Mom & Pop shops all around. My children will never have that experience. Sure, we have streaming video now, but it is not the same. Goodbye video stores and thanks for the fun times, but you are just a part of cultural history now of how we used to do things. frown.gif
post #134 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icon13 View Post

So sad. My childhood is full of memories of renting videos on weekends. Those were magical nights when Mom and Dad would take us, and we would ravage aimlessly through the entire store trying to find that one special video (or game) we could take home with us. There is something nostalgic about going to the video stores back then, and not just the Blockbusters and Hollywood Videos, but the numerous Mom & Pop shops all around. My children will never have that experience. Sure, we have streaming video now, but it is not the same. Goodbye video stores and thanks for the fun times, but you are just a part of cultural history now of how we used to do things. frown.gif

Thanks for putting it so well.
post #135 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

True story. Back in the early 90's I forgot to return "Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown" in the course of moving and changing phone numbers. I was reminded of that when I was arrested by two detectives and charged with larceny—$1500—which was the value the store attached to the "stolen" video cassette.


I returned the movie (escorted by the detectives), paid a fine and the charges were dropped—but not before I was fingerprinted and spent a few hours in a jail cell.

Not sure if you're kidding but that is an amazing story smile.gif
post #136 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gamermwm View Post


Not sure if you're kidding but that is an amazing story smile.gif

That's the absolute truth.

post #137 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJPDC View Post

People all over the Internet lauding over a US company going out of business and all the lost jobs and wages as payback for a $5 late fee they paid for returning a movie late in 1999.

 

And rejoicing over a company that had charged late fees for movies that were returned on time!

 

I felt some joy when the last Blockbuster store front closed in town.

 

I was saddened when the other movie rental stores closed because those provided more selection, or had people more familiar with various titles, and did not have a reputation for charging late fees for tapes returned on time.

post #138 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by FATHERFORD View Post

Best buy will stay around after this last restructure. Their price matching policy has really helped the store come back.

I go to best buy, pull up amazon on my phone, check prices. If amazon is cheaper BB will price match and I get to use the points towards my rewards card. I also instantly have the movie instead of waiting 2 day shipping.

I've even gone into best buy and found stuff cheaper then online.
Is there a way to thumbs down? What good is price matching WHEN YOU STILL HAVE TO PAY FOR TAX, gas money, wear and tear on your vehicle and TIME wasted on the trip, which for me, is the most valuable of commodities. Shun Amazon, more for me, spending less money!
post #139 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by FATHERFORD View Post

Best buy will stay around after this last restructure. Their price matching policy has really helped the store come back.

I go to best buy, pull up amazon on my phone, check prices. If amazon is cheaper BB will price match and I get to use the points towards my rewards card. I also instantly have the movie instead of waiting 2 day shipping.

I've even gone into best buy and found stuff cheaper then online.
I want to keep b&m's in our town.
And it employs people. I also like to occasionally see what I'm buying.
post #140 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FATHERFORD View Post


Best buy will stay around after this last restructure. Their price matching policy has really helped the store come back.

I go to best buy, pull up amazon on my phone, check prices. If amazon is cheaper BB will price match and I get to use the points towards my rewards card. I also instantly have the movie instead of waiting 2 day shipping.

I've even gone into best buy and found stuff cheaper then online.

I thought Best Buy was toast, then came the restructure. Now I still shop there, and here's why...

 

1. I bike to my local Best Buy, which means I get exercise

2. I shop for open box and clearance items and get great deals as a result

3. Thanks to my elite plus reward zone status, I get 45 days to return items

4. I often try several open-box items before deciding on which to keep

5. A new feature on the Best Buy website lets you search open-box items in multiple stores

6. Sometimes I need something right away, not tomorrow

7. I never, ever buy cables from Best Buy. Ever. Total ripoff

8. Blu-rays are usually on sale on release day, I use reward zone credit to buy them


Edited by imagic - 11/11/13 at 5:10pm
post #141 of 185
Good riddance to bad rubbish. rolleyes.gif
post #142 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

That's the absolute truth.

Wow I almost wish that had happened to me just so I'd have a far-out story to tell my grandkids someday when I speak of the olden days. That's pure gold
Quote:
Originally Posted by morbidcorpse View Post

Is there a way to thumbs down? What good is price matching WHEN YOU STILL HAVE TO PAY FOR TAX, gas money, wear and tear on your vehicle and TIME wasted on the trip, which for me, is the most valuable of commodities

My thoughts exactly. And Amazon may not give rewards points for purchases and loyalty but what I save in time/hassle cannot be measured in dollar and cents
post #143 of 185
An Amazon Visa card is your way to rewards.
post #144 of 185
http://variety.com/2013/biz/news/this-is-the-end-blockbuster-1200820318/
Quote:
The comedy “This Is the End” was the last movie rented from a Blockbuster store, the retailer said.

The final transaction, as Dish Network shuts down the remaining 300 stores Blockbuster operates, took place at 11 p.m. on Nov. 9 in Hawaii.
post #145 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by morbidcorpse View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by FATHERFORD View Post

Best buy will stay around after this last restructure. Their price matching policy has really helped the store come back.

I go to best buy, pull up amazon on my phone, check prices. If amazon is cheaper BB will price match and I get to use the points towards my rewards card. I also instantly have the movie instead of waiting 2 day shipping.

I've even gone into best buy and found stuff cheaper then online.
Is there a way to thumbs down? What good is price matching WHEN YOU STILL HAVE TO PAY FOR TAX, gas money, wear and tear on your vehicle and TIME wasted on the trip, which for me, is the most valuable of commodities. Shun Amazon, more for me, spending less money!

As a Texas resident, I pay tax anyway.

I stop by Best Buy either on my way home from work if I have to get something that day, or on the weekend as sams, costco, heb, wal-mart, etc. are all right in the same place as best buy when we do our weekly shopping. Therefore "wear and tear" is not that big of a deal either.

I use amazon/prime quite a bit, I would say at least every other day I get a package or two from them.

I also use best buy online and ship as there are times it's actually CHEAPER then amazon.

Returns are at both are fairly easy. Best buy is even easier most of the time as I can make a swap instantly.

Lets also not forget the local economics as pointed out above.

For me, stopping and shopping by Best Buy makes sense.
Edited by FATHERFORD - 11/12/13 at 5:18am
post #146 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post

Make clear city and state, let's try and get all remaining 300 in thus thread captured in photos......


Via my 32GB iPhone4 using Tapatalk

Blockbuster Brighton Michigan closing, I bought 5 blu-rays, 12 theatre size candy bars, and 6 popcorn seasoning shakers.
Hard to see but it was 30 deg f and snowing here, look by the fire hydrant....too cold!!


They had 2 un-used PS3's, each went for $125...I would have gotten 1
Edited by mtbdudex - 11/12/13 at 8:54am
post #147 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Closet Geek View Post

Good riddance. I used to love the trip to the local with my kids as it was one of those unique experiences you can't get anywhere else, much like, ironically, going to the movie theater and eating movie theater popcorn. When I fell on hard times and was unemployed, I couldn't take the family out as usual so Blockbuster really was a nice (reliable) treat. That particular Christmas I bought my kids each a BB gift card because it's no fun telling the kids "No, I don't have the money to spare to rent a movie or a game this week (thank God for a reversal of fortune)". So I saved up and got them gift cards so they could go whenever they wanted, relatively speaking. That is until they told me a couple months later that we couldn't use the cards any more and had to convert them to some other card program that was half value or full value on the online service. Well...my money was managed tightly so one of my cut backs was internet service. I explained this to management and further explained my particular circumstances (not to mention we were regulars there) and they were more than happy to devalue my kids gift cards. I felt like this company stole from my children (their Christmas presents no less) and after exhausting what they did offer us (again at less value) I never even considered setting foot in another Blockbuster again. I'm not a guy who holds a grudge at all but....yep....still quite bitter about that because life was hard enough at the time. Having to explain to young kids (who still believed in Santa at the time) why they don't have as much rental money as they thought is heartbreaking.

Damn, that story just about drew a tear to my eye. frown.gif Glad things worked out better for you and your kids.
post #148 of 185
Gee I guess Blockbuster's 'turn around' quarter when they liquidated the Canadian stores and put down the one time sending of the cash US ward as proof of management 'genius' did not actually save the company after all.
post #149 of 185
Sad to see a "viable" alternative to having to do download/streaming that afforded the highest quality of picture and sound experience.

Happy to say I haven't been in a Blockbuster... ever! I still have a "mom & pop" type store 2 minutes from my house. $3.00 blu-ray rental , $3.50 for 3D blu-ray, $2.00 for DVD all for 3 days, and I am friendly with the knowledgeable staff and haven't been charged any late fees, even if it's 2 days late! And they will "hold" a new release for me if I ask them to! Once out for over a month or so, the rental prices drop... plus for every 10 "recent release" rentals I get one free. I kids and I will occasionally come home from the video store with 4-6 movies for the week-end, (we each pick 2) that includes atleast 2 new releases and it's usually about $12.00 total. The selection is amazing and huge. I am so happy that this place didn't fold under the Hollywood Video/Blockbuster pressure, and seems to be doing okay inspite of the Netflix, Redbox, VOD alternative also. Their are usually 2-3 customers when we go in, and several drop off rentals while we cruise up and down the isles looking for our pick.

(I'll give up my shiney discs when you pry them from my cold dead fingers!)
post #150 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by AVTrauma View Post

Sad to see a "viable" alternative to having to do download/streaming that afforded the highest quality of picture and sound experience.

Happy to say I haven't been in a Blockbuster... ever! I still have a "mom & pop" type store 2 minutes from my house. $3.00 blu-ray rental , $3.50 for 3D blu-ray, $2.00 for DVD all for 3 days, and I am friendly with the knowledgeable staff and haven't been charged any late fees, even if it's 2 days late! And they will "hold" a new release for me if I ask them to! Once out for over a month or so, the rental prices drop... plus for every 10 "recent release" rentals I get one free. I kids and I will occasionally come home from the video store with 4-6 movies for the week-end, (we each pick 2) that includes atleast 2 new releases and it's usually about $12.00 total. The selection is amazing and huge. I am so happy that this place didn't fold under the Hollywood Video/Blockbuster pressure, and seems to be doing okay inspite of the Netflix, Redbox, VOD alternative also. Their are usually 2-3 customers when we go in, and several drop off rentals while we cruise up and down the isles looking for our pick.

(I'll give up my shiney discs when you pry them from my cold dead fingers!)

sadly these mom&pop shops are slowly going away.....there also was 1 near by our home.....it shut down 1 year ago...
Now redbox is in all the krogers/meijers/walmarts....at $1.50/night and available to online reserve it's pretty convient.
The low cost is the low overhead....I also refuse to stream HD due to the audio is not lossless!
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