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Blockbuster to Close Remaining Stores and End Disc By Mail - Page 2

post #31 of 185
post #32 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Closet Geek View Post

Good riddance. I used to love the trip to the local with my kids as it was one of those unique experiences you can't get anywhere else, much like, ironically, going to the movie theater and eating movie theater popcorn. When I fell on hard times and was unemployed, I couldn't take the family out as usual so Blockbuster really was a nice (reliable) treat. That particular Christmas I bought my kids each a BB gift card because it's no fun telling the kids "No, I don't have the money to spare to rent a movie or a game this week (thank God for a reversal of fortune)". So I saved up and got them gift cards so they could go whenever they wanted, relatively speaking. That is until they told me a couple months later that we couldn't use the cards any more and had to convert them to some other card program that was half value or full value on the online service. Well...my money was managed tightly so one of my cut backs was internet service. I explained this to management and further explained my particular circumstances (not to mention we were regulars there) and they were more than happy to devalue my kids gift cards. I felt like this company stole from my children (their Christmas presents no less) and after exhausting what they did offer us (again at less value) I never even considered setting foot in another Blockbuster again. I'm not a guy who holds a grudge at all but....yep....still quite bitter about that because life was hard enough at the time. Having to explain to young kids (who still believed in Santa at the time) why they don't have as much rental money as they thought is heartbreaking.

Wow, that is lame. I wanted to post that I'll miss BB, but after this, I think I'm happy for you to see them go. Sad story man.
post #33 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by PcGeek626 View Post

This is scary, it seems like hollywood retards want's all of us to watch digital films. But i'm not gonna watch a poor quality stream with horrible data caps from comcast. Like leo laporte says, "physical media is dead". rolleyes.gif
Unlike Leos many unsuccessful shows a physical media industry making multi billions in 2013 is hardly "Dead"
post #34 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TowerGrove View Post


Unlike Leos many unsuccessful shows a physical media industry making multi billions in 2013 is hardly "Dead"

I have not heard of this industry, what's it called? Steaming and downloads are making billions, Apple is the world's most valuable tech company, and netflix makes almost all its money from streaming. Physical media might be a multi-billion dollar industry, but the profits are not the same as with streaming. Stores are shrinking their blu-ray departments and hiding the shelves in the back corner, instead of by the front door. 

Physical media is by no means dead, but it is not as profitable and it has been overtaken by online delivery. It is on the decline.

(Netflix stats)

post #35 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by repete66211 View Post

Unfortunately, the company that improved on the movie rental business by removing late fees, Netflix, has gone from a great company to an organization more concerned with their own stock price than they are in keeping their customers happy. They're also not renting discs anymore, not that they kept much Blu-ray stock (despite charging extra for it) to begin with.
Wha?

https://dvd.netflix.com/ (I presume Blu-rays are available through here still).
post #36 of 185
Well, I'm sorry to lose brick-and-mortar places to stop and rent blu rays and DVD's. Although in my neighborhood Netflix has been the only way to attain Blu rays and DVD's for a couple of years now. Our (purchased) Blu ray versions of movies look better than what I get on DISH Network hi def channels. Sound better too.
post #37 of 185
Sad to see them gone...

I liked going to local store and exchange movies... that's until they closed nearby stores.

After they closed nearby store couple of months ago... I started noticing movies by mail were not getting mailed as quickly as before... Then did a month trial with Netflix and they were (and still do) ship next on my queue the next day they receive my movies...

It made no sense to continue with BB when I was getting better service from Netflix... so canceled BB months ago.

Does this mean Netflix will jack up mail movie service since BB gone ?? LOL

Note: I also much prefer blu ray quality vs streaming...
post #38 of 185
As if...
post #39 of 185
Quote:
"At its height, Blockbuster operated more than 9,000 stores around the world, but in less than a decade its retail presence has been effectively wiped out. It's yet another sign that physical media is all but obsolete for most movie-watchers" source: The Verge

The last sentence jumps to a conclusion without substantiation. It is just as likely that the demise of Blockbuster indicates that consumers are utilising other avenues to obtain disc media (Redbox, Netflix) and the brick-and-mortar rental store model has become unfeasible.

So long as streaming content cannot match physical media fidelity (streaming still lags FAR behind in audio) then I'll be watching shiny, spinning discs. I'm also still a big watcher of special features, which are almost non-existent for streaming delivery methods.

The demise of Blockbuster was due more to their entrenched management mindset and new market competitors than a physical media consumer shift. Redbox came along and Blockbuster was very slow to react to the model.
post #40 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingLeerUK View Post

The last sentence jumps to a conclusion without substantiation. It is just as likely that the demise of Blockbuster indicates that consumers are utilising other avenues to obtain disc media (Redbox, Netflix) and the brick-and-mortar rental store model has become unfeasible.

So long as streaming content cannot match physical media fidelity (streaming still lags FAR behind in audio) then I'll be watching shiny, spinning discs. I'm also still a big watcher of special features, which are almost non-existent for streaming delivery methods.

The demise of Blockbuster was due more to their entrenched management mindset and new market competitors than a physical media consumer shift. Redbox came along and Blockbuster was very slow to react to the model.
Yep +1
post #41 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingLeerUK View Post


The last sentence jumps to a conclusion without substantiation. It is just as likely that the demise of Blockbuster indicates that consumers are utilising other avenues to obtain disc media (Redbox, Netflix) and the brick-and-mortar rental store model has become unfeasible.

So long as streaming content cannot match physical media fidelity (streaming still lags FAR behind in audio) then I'll be watching shiny, spinning discs. I'm also still a big watcher of special features, which are almost non-existent for streaming delivery methods.

The demise of Blockbuster was due more to their entrenched management mindset and new market competitors than a physical media consumer shift. Redbox came along and Blockbuster was very slow to react to the model.

I hate to say it, but things are not looking that good for physical media. This is the time when the transition is occurring. In a few years discs will experience the same existential threat as plasma TVs. The mass market demands instant, wireless access to everything, not ultimate fidelity that requires effort just to get playing—a process currently measured in minutes, not seconds.

 

It is far more likely that cheap fiber broadband will reach the majority of consumers, as opposed to convincing the nation to upgrade to a next-generation physical media player. The transition may take a few more years, but in the near future people will associate movie purchases directly with their TVs. Most consumers do not care about the extra fidelity afforded by uncompressed audio, and increasing the bandwidth of compressed audio is easy enough, it only takes up a small percentage of a HD stream.

 

It is far more likely that Blu-ray will just stick around and serve the same purpose as CDs do for music, and an attempt to introduce a new disc format for UHD video will likely meet a fate similar to SACD. That should be fine, since 1080p really is sufficient for 95% of hollywood content, and of course the audio is pristine. It just won't be the dominant format of the future, and the gap between online delivery and physical media releases of the same movie will likely grow from the current two weeks that Vudu and iTunes enjoy for many movie titles.


Edited by imagic - 11/7/13 at 4:08pm
post #42 of 185
I certainly can't deny that physical media isn't what it was during the DVD-era heyday of the 2000's, but to expect sufficient infrastructure upgrades within the next 10 years that will allow HD and UHD/4k streaming to completely supplant physical media seems like a really big stretch (but what do I know). The USA isn't like the Japanese or European markets where the density of population allows for infrastructure upgrades to rapidly engage large segments of the viewing public; said another way - the US is a big place (literally).

MP3 and iTunes(January 9, 2001) have been singing the death knell of CDs for over a decade now, but record companies are still making them and people are still buying them.
post #43 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingLeerUK View Post

I certainly can't deny that physical media isn't what it was during the DVD-era heyday of the 2000's, but to expect sufficient infrastructure upgrades within the next 10 years that will allow HD and UHD/4k streaming to completely supplant physical media seems like a really big stretch (but what do I know). The USA isn't like the Japanese or European markets where the density of population allows for infrastructure upgrades to rapidly engage large segments of the viewing public; said another way - the US is a big place (literally).

MP3 and iTunes(January 9, 2001) have been singing the death knell of CDs for over a decade now, but record companies are still making them and people are still buying them.

Maybe that's a blessing in disguise. People who live in rural areas will be forced to watch higher-quality content than urban dwellers, whether they do it consciously or out of necessity. Amazon certainly serves all addresses. At least rural homes are fine for multiple subwoofer setups and all that, not so much in a city apartment. 

 

It's clear physical media has enough fans that it will linger around for years, maybe decades... I have no clue.

post #44 of 185
Have you seen the CD section at Best Buy? Its almost non existent. They used to have aisles and aisles of CD's.

Places like Tower Records closed all their stores because of slow CD sales.
post #45 of 185
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by afrogt View Post

Have you seen the CD section at Best Buy? Its almost non existent. They used to have aisles and aisles of CD's.

Places like Tower Records closed all their stores because of slow CD sales.

Many Best Buy stores also moved the Blu-ray section to the back of the store, and new releases that used to always be positioned by the entrance are no longer there.

post #46 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

Many Best Buy stores also moved the Blu-ray section to the back of the store, and new releases that used to always be positioned by the entrance are no longer there.
Do you think the industry is trying to remove the idea of ownership and replace it with the idea of streaming?
post #47 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by afrogt View Post

Have you seen the CD section at Best Buy? Its almost non existent. They used to have aisles and aisles of CD's.

Places like Tower Records closed all their stores because of slow CD sales.

Once again, it possibly proves that consumers are shifting their purchasing to a different distribution source, not necessarily that the format itself is in serious decline. I haven't purchased a CD in a brick-and-mortar store now going on half a decade, but I buy MANY CDs from Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk "Is CD in decline?" Sure it is, has been for 10 years - but it still hasn't reached the threshold where there isn't still a large and lucrative market for them.

If anything, MP3 electronic distribution has one over on digital content streaming because when I purchase an MP3 from Amazon.com and download it to my local storage device(s) it is "mine" and I can't have the rug pulled out from under my ownership/license-ship by the content provider going under or discontinuing support for the title (Netlifx variable availability of titles is a continuing annoyance with the service).
post #48 of 185
A while back I was getting lots of broken Blu-ray discs from Netflix so thought I'd give Blockbuster a try. I was surprised at the lack of movie titles Blockbuster had and canceled after the 30 day free trial. Anyway I went back to Netflix and continued to get broken discs (over 50). I'm sure the USPS sorting facility was to blame (running them through a machine) everyone cracked in same place (1/2" in on outer edge. I've canceled Netflix for 3 months and will try again sometime in Dec. to see if they have problem fixed.
post #49 of 185
I have to admit that I am a little sad to see them go, if only for nostalgia. Though I saw this coming when I worked for them almost 15 years ago when their biggest competitor was the movie section of grocery stores. We were basically forced to treat the customers like crap to enforce policies like the outrageous late fees and would get in trouble if we waived or split too many of them and it became sort of a game as awful as that sounds. Oh the arguments that created... I used to love renting movies and games when I was a kid, but haven't bothered with that in almost a decade. They mismanaged the hell out of that company and only saw people as dollar signs. As much as I like the convenience of streaming I am still a huge fan of physical media, I prefer something tangible, not something out in the ether; although I can't help but buy a ton a cheap games on Steam when they have a sale.
post #50 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by platoon2063 View Post

I will be sad to see my local store close. I know both managers well and BTW, have never been charged a late fee. Helps to get to know people.

Oh, is one of them Randy? Randy Marsh is a manager at a Blockbuster in Colorado. Say Hi for me if you see him.
post #51 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by afrogt View Post

Have you seen the CD section at Best Buy? Its almost non existent. They used to have aisles and aisles of CD's.

Places like Tower Records closed all their stores because of slow CD sales.

Best Buy is also not long for this world. It might take a few years or perhaps five, but they are being slowly strangled by Amazon (I can't even remember the last time I bought a Blu-ray in a brick & mortar store). They will follow Tower Records into the void.

(FWIW I buy virtually all of my HT equipment from AVScience now too, sorry Best Buy. smile.gif )
post #52 of 185
I will be sorry to see brick and mortar stores gone. I try and do some purchasing in them. BB matches Amazon prices.
post #53 of 185
Red Box was the nail in the coffin, you can't fight cheap rentals. I won't be surprised to see Red Box kiosks to even sabotage their own streaming efforts. Without the kiosks
as competition Blockbuster might have survived.
When Dish bought Blockbuster I had this feeling they wouldn't survive, there are times when I'm not happy when I'm right. frown.gif
post #54 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

I hate to say it, but things are not looking that good for physical media. This is the time when the transition is occurring. In a few years discs will experience the same existential threat as plasma TVs. The mass market demands instant, wireless access to everything, not ultimate fidelity that requires effort just to get playing—a process currently measured in minutes, not seconds.

It is far more likely that cheap fiber broadband will reach the majority of consumers, as opposed to convincing the nation to upgrade to a next-generation physical media player. The transition may take a few more years, but in the near future people will associate movie purchases directly with their TVs. Most consumers do not care about the extra fidelity afforded by uncompressed audio, and increasing the bandwidth of compressed audio is easy enough, it only takes up a small percentage of a HD stream.

It is far more likely that Blu-ray will just stick around and serve the same purpose as CDs do for music, and an attempt to introduce a new disc format for UHD video will likely meet a fate similar to SACD. That should be fine, since 1080p really is sufficient for 95% of hollywood content, and of course the audio is pristine. It just won't be the dominant format of the future, and the gap between online delivery and physical media releases of the same movie will likely grow from the current two weeks that Vudu and iTunes enjoy for many movie titles.
10 years from now we'll still be kicking this around. Cheap broadband is not a given, especially in rural areas where they hardly have any broadband service now. Streaming is and will be a solution for more populated areas but not for the forgotten.
post #55 of 185
I love physical media. I like to read the booklets and learn about the state of Hollywood and/or the world at the time the film was made. I love Bluray multipacks, that allow me to watch the ultimate at home, or SD DVD on the road. I love the digital copies to watch on my ipad during travel or anytime a DVD player and TV is not available. Buying a movie from iTunes, VUDU, etc. does not give me that latitude, and except for iTunes in some situations, no extras at all. Now that Amazon charges sales tax and has raised their free shipping threshold to $35.00, Best Buy, Target, Walmart, etc. are much more competitive. However, in spite of my ability to acquire a library to watch when I want, I really miss going into a video store circa 1985-1995 and being able to rent obscure titles, classics, foreign films which now for the most part I am compelled to purchase. When was the last time Netflix offered a Buster Keaton or Charlie Chaplin film? In short, I want physical media to stay for purchase and want video stores to rent what films I want to explore without buying. I do not lament the demise of Block Buster as it supplanted the video stores that offered selection, and was then engulfed by Redbox that offered the same narrow selection as Block Buster with more convenience at a better price. However, ultimately the avid film fan has been the loser as the home video market has evolved.
post #56 of 185

I'm indifferent to them closing. After a coworker complaining that she turned in a tape on time but they waited hours before scanning it in so it showed up late and they charged her, they lost the whole department as potential customers. And that was the second time I heard complaints of tapes being turned in on time but scanned in late.

 

The local Hollywood Video treated their customers better.

 

However, I stopped renting movies at the local video rental stores long before DVDs became popular.

 

Conversely, I have been a Netflix customer since July, 2002, and overall I am happy with them.

 

It was somewhere around that time (2002) or a year or two later that the local video rental storefronts all closed down, and only in the past two or three years that Redbox and the like started appearing around town.


Edited by Mark12547 - 11/8/13 at 1:51am
post #57 of 185
I am not happy about it like many have said it's another step closer to inferior downloads/streaming hugely over compressed ***T.

In the UK i don't know if they are closing all stores but chances are they will.

For blu-ray's rental here i still have LoveFilm where you rent them online, and post them back within a specific time frame. But i wonder how long it must be before that "has" to stop too.

I don't want to be forced into buying every disk just to watch it as all are not worth keeping so it's catch 22.

There is always the bay of course but that doesn't help the disk industry either.

Digital only is a one way ticket to poo bay imo.
Edited by Stu03 - 11/8/13 at 2:04am
post #58 of 185
I think its evolutionary.... I recall when they opened and only carried VHS tapes and the coming of DVDs were HUGE! Fast forward to today; and we now have broadband\satellite\cellular and carry mini computer in our hands everywhere. I'm looking forward to things changing even more: Google Glass, connected cars and who knows...maybe implanted tech that lets me watch The 5th Element in my sleep.
post #59 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin Morgan View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by afrogt View Post

Have you seen the CD section at Best Buy? Its almost non existent. They used to have aisles and aisles of CD's.

Places like Tower Records closed all their stores because of slow CD sales.

Best Buy is also not long for this world. It might take a few years or perhaps five, but they are being slowly strangled by Amazon (I can't even remember the last time I bought a Blu-ray in a brick & mortar store). They will follow Tower Records into the void.

(FWIW I buy virtually all of my HT equipment from AVScience now too, sorry Best Buy. smile.gif )

Best buy will stay around after this last restructure. Their price matching policy has really helped the store come back.

I go to best buy, pull up amazon on my phone, check prices. If amazon is cheaper BB will price match and I get to use the points towards my rewards card. I also instantly have the movie instead of waiting 2 day shipping.

I've even gone into best buy and found stuff cheaper then online.
post #60 of 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by tory40 View Post

Good riddance. They were no friend to most people they served. Like many businesses today they were not interested in a fair exchange of goods and they had no problems creating policies designed to simply reach into your wallet and remove the cash from it. They took advantage of people's absent mindedness and depression, charging late fees (a half hours work for many people) even when they had 150 more copies on the shelf. They bought out the movielinks.com site, didn't change it much, but promptly closed down the .99 cent movie special, no doubt a niche movie resource for many low income folks.

My experience too dealing with several Blockbuster stores in 3 states. Got charged late fees even when they were turned in on time! Lost my business years ago.
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