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Virgin Plasma TV buyer needs advice

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hello, I have just joined this awesome pool of talent and can't thank you enough for your advice as I am not a techy.  I need advice on getting my first 2 plasma tvs, one for living room and one for master bedroom.  I have read that plasma has the best picture and no longer has the problelms it use to.  I would really like to get the largest tv I can for my living room (budget $700.00 or maybe a little more) and the same for my bedroom for around $550.00.  I don't play games or stream movies but would like to learn how in the future and get a blue-ray player to learn too. I've read in the forum that Panasonic seems to be solid and well liked. 

 

I have a Samsung PN51F5300 on hold at HH Greg today which I paid $585.89 but I don't know if it's a good unit and a good price.  With Black Friday and Cyber Monday coming I'm thinking maybe I should take it back.  I would be very grateful for any advice on what to buy and if waiting for the special buys is a good idea. - Thanks Steve

post #2 of 17

I'm a Plasma virgin too. Forget LG, forget Samsung, forget all the other manfactuerers for plasma. Panasonic is and always will be the best in the game. In reality a plasma isnt the same price as those crap LCD - LCD/LED tv's. The cheapest full HD (1080p) Panasonic plasma for a 42" (the smallest they come in) is $899 retail. You are venturing into a world of TV superiority. The only downside to plasma's is that they need to be broken in before you watch almost ANYTHING, if you don't want to ruin your set from IR or possible permanent burn-in. You have to age the gas phosphors for about 250 hours, which is a week or two of breaking-in. If you dont know anything about technology or just tv's in general I would recommend you get professional calibrator to break in your plasma and after broken-in, get him to calibrate it too. All in all, plasma's need to be taken care of. I did my homework and I advise you to do yours too. I know almost everything I need to know about plasma's. Plus I love technology which makes it even better.

post #3 of 17
Samsung pretty much closed the gap, and depending on your needs, raised the bar with the f8500.

Panasonic is tried and true, they've been good for a few years, but Samsung is also very good now, and will be your best option next year...

that being said, for entry level priced TV's, you should stick with Panasonic. try for an S60 if you can. reasonable performance for very very cheap.

if your living room is always quite bright, you could get away with an LCD too there. imo, lcd's only become unwatchable in a dark room when you can see the horrible backlighting. in a bright room, you can't really noticed the improved blacks and contrast on a plasma, and they end up looking similar. this is even more true when we're talking about cheap TV's.

which leads me to my real advice. decide on which one you will use the most, and want to be the best. for example, say you won't use the bedroom tv that much. go buy a cheap lcd for 300 bux, put the saved money towards your living room tv and buy a better or bigger one. if you can move into an ST60 instead, you're now talking about a tv you're going to love for years to come, and won't be beaten by anything short of OLED
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by oechikr View Post

I'm a Plasma virgin too. Forget LG, forget Samsung, forget all the other manfactuerers for plasma. Panasonic is and always will be the best in the game. In reality a plasma isnt the same price as those crap LCD - LCD/LED tv's. The cheapest full HD (1080p) Panasonic plasma for a 42" (the smallest they come in) is $899 retail. You are venturing into a world of TV superiority. The only downside to plasma's is that they need to be broken in before you watch almost ANYTHING, if you don't want to ruin your set from IR or possible permanent burn-in. You have to age the gas phosphors for about 250 hours, which is a week or two of breaking-in. If you dont know anything about technology or just tv's in general I would recommend you get professional calibrator to break in your plasma and after broken-in, get him to calibrate it too. All in all, plasma's need to be taken care of. I did my homework and I advise you to do yours too. I know almost everything I need to know about plasma's. Plus I love technology which makes it even better.

Actually you need to do more homework - there are a number of false and incorrect statements in your post wink.gif

They don't NEED to be broken in before watching TV, break-in doesn't prevent or reduce the chance of getting IR or Burn-In, nobody has a calibrator break their TV in for them, you don't need to have it calibrated, and Panasonic doesn't make a 42" Plasma anymore - it was discontinued like 7 months ago and they are long gone.
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by fierce_gt View Post

Samsung pretty much closed the gap, and depending on your needs, raised the bar with the f8500.

Panasonic is tried and true, they've been good for a few years, but Samsung is also very good now, and will be your best option next year...

that being said, for entry level priced TV's, you should stick with Panasonic. try for an S60 if you can. reasonable performance for very very cheap.

if your living room is always quite bright, you could get away with an LCD too there. imo, lcd's only become unwatchable in a dark room when you can see the horrible backlighting. in a bright room, you can't really noticed the improved blacks and contrast on a plasma, and they end up looking similar. this is even more true when we're talking about cheap TV's.

which leads me to my real advice. decide on which one you will use the most, and want to be the best. for example, say you won't use the bedroom tv that much. go buy a cheap lcd for 300 bux, put the saved money towards your living room tv and buy a better or bigger one. if you can move into an ST60 instead, you're now talking about a tv you're going to love for years to come, and won't be beaten by anything short of OLED

 

Good advice. My understanding was that all he wanted was a plasma. I wish everyone knew that plasma technology is the best (for now), but the average consumer doesnt have time for the hassle and maintenance of actually taking care of a Plasma TV. I dont know if Samsung is actually gonna put time into their plasma sets and step up their game. Chances are everyones gonna look into OLED... as Panasonic is.

post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyWalters View Post


Actually you need to do more homework - there are a number of false and incorrect statements in your post wink.gif

They don't NEED to be broken in before watching TV, break-in doesn't prevent or reduce the chance of getting IR or Burn-In, nobody has a calibrator break their TV in for them, you don't need to have it calibrated, and Panasonic doesn't make a 42" Plasma anymore - it was discontinued like 7 months ago and they are long gone.

 

I will respect your 16,000 posts, Yoda. But what I've been reading off multiple opinions, for hours and hours, is that it is better to break-in, than to not break-in. It ages the phosphors so you can properly calibrate it, after the break-in period. I've also read that it reduces the chance of IR. Like come on. Are you gonna watch a movie with black bars or play a game with an HUD for hours, RIGHT out of the box? HA. I wouldnt. When I get my first one and only Panny, I'm gonna take care of it the best I can, because in reality THERE IS GONNA BE NO MORE. You're right about getting a professional calibrator. I said that because judging by the OP's post, he doesnt know too much... and I would hate for him to get a Panasonic and it be abused and/or ruined. But yeah, in reality no ones hires a calibrator. I'll give you that. Btw, 42" isnt "long gone". Go make a google search on the S60 or X60. Plus many many stores still have those models.


Edited by oechikr - 12/1/13 at 10:49am
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by oechikr View Post

I will respect your 16,000 posts, Yoda. But what I've been reading off multiple opinions, for hours an hours, is that it is better to break-in, than to not break-in. It ages the phosphors so you can properly calibrate it, after the break-in period. I've also read that it reduces the chance of IR. Like come on. Are you gonna watch a movie with black bars or play a game with an HUD for hours, RIGHT out of the box? HA. I wouldnt. When I get my first one and only Panny, I'm gonna take care of it the best I can, because in reality THERE IS GONNA BE NO MORE. You're right about getting a professional calibrator. I said that because judging by the OP's post, he doesnt know too much... and I would hate for him to get a Panasonic and it be abused and/or ruined. But yeah, in reality no ones hires a calibrator. I'll give you that. Btw, 42" isnt "long gone". Go make a google search on the S60 or X60. Plus many many stores still have those models.

Why get a little 42 inch one, I would get the biggest that can fit the wall, and the 42 may be ok for a secondary set like a bed room, but KNOW this after its up a bit the things start to shrink.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil17108 View Post


Why get a little 42 inch one, I would get the biggest that can fit the wall, and the 42 may be ok for a secondary set like a bed room, but KNOW this after its up a bit the things start to shrink.

 

 

Just so you know, I'm a student and I don't have a $1500+ to buy a high-end set. Plus I simply dont have the space for a 50"+. So I'm getting a 42" set that has full HD (S60). I think I'll be happy until I get my own house or something. I wish I was rich though so I could get the ZT60 for safe keepings since Panasonic is moving on from plasma technology :/

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by oechikr View Post


Just so you know, I'm a student and I don't have a $1500+ to buy a high-end set. Plus I simply dont have the space for a 50"+. So I'm getting a 42" set that has full HD (S60). I think I'll be happy until I get my own house or something. I wish I was rich though so I could get the ZT60 for safe keepings since Panasonic is moving on from plasma technology :/

By the time you are rich there will be something new to hang on the wall thats a lot better then plasma, the way tech marches forward bet it's long before that point and the price is down some more. How about something that you paint on the wall and when there is a need for a new sit its just a paint over.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by oechikr View Post

I will respect your 16,000 posts, Yoda. But what I've been reading off multiple opinions, for hours and hours, is that it is better to break-in, than to not break-in. It ages the phosphors so you can properly calibrate it, after the break-in period. I've also read that it reduces the chance of IR. Like come on. Are you gonna watch a movie with black bars or play a game with an HUD for hours, RIGHT out of the box? HA. I wouldnt. When I get my first one and only Panny, I'm gonna take care of it the best I can, because in reality THERE IS GONNA BE NO MORE. You're right about getting a professional calibrator. I said that because judging by the OP's post, he doesnt know too much... and I would hate for him to get a Panasonic and it be abused and/or ruined. But yeah, in reality no ones hires a calibrator. I'll give you that. Btw, 42" isnt "long gone". Go make a google search on the S60 or X60. Plus many many stores still have those models.

I think there's a little misconception here. the 'break in slides' don't really do anything long term. they are just a safe way to speed up the process so you can get that professional calibration sooner, and enjoy the best looking content 'right away'. 200-300hrs could be like 4months use, or more for some ppl. sucks to have to wait that long before you get a pro calibration, or have to get one done twice.

if you do your own calibrations, or are going to eat through the hrs quickly anyway, there's really no use for the slides.

personally, what I've done, with no ill-effects, is use my tv normally from hr 1, but run the slides at night when i'm not using the tv. this more than doubles my usage for the first week, and makes the calibration I do on week two or three more meaningful.

I happen to use my f8500 as my computer monitor, i'm using it right now as I type this. I will admit, I tried to avoid doing this at first, but that only lasted until day 2, haha. I did watch letterbox movies the first day I bought it though.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by oechikr View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by RandyWalters View Post

Actually you need to do more homework - there are a number of false and incorrect statements in your post wink.gif


They don't NEED to be broken in before watching TV, break-in doesn't prevent or reduce the chance of getting IR or Burn-In, nobody has a calibrator break their TV in for them, you don't need to have it calibrated, and Panasonic doesn't make a 42" Plasma anymore - it was discontinued like 7 months ago and they are long gone.

I will respect your 16,000 posts, Yoda. But what I've been reading off multiple opinions, for hours and hours, is that it is better to break-in, than to not break-in. It ages the phosphors so you can properly calibrate it, after the break-in period. I've also read that it reduces the chance of IR. Like come on. Are you gonna watch a movie with black bars or play a game with an HUD for hours, RIGHT out of the box? HA. I wouldnt. When I get my first one and only Panny, I'm gonna take care of it the best I can, because in reality THERE IS GONNA BE NO MORE. You're right about getting a professional calibrator. I said that because judging by the OP's post, he doesnt know too much... and I would hate for him to get a Panasonic and it be abused and/or ruined. But yeah, in reality no ones hires a calibrator. I'll give you that. Btw, 42" isnt "long gone". Go make a google search on the S60 or X60. Plus many many stores still have those models.

You must have also read that break in does nothing to prevent IR and that running slides does nothing but age the pixels, which can serve a few real purposes. That's the truth.
The best advice I've read, and used, is to feed the tv a variety of content. If you want to turn the contrast down then do and please, please take it out of Standard- it really is pointless. There is no harm in trying out other people's settings to find what you think looks best, tweak them if you like, but know that it may change after awhile when the pixels are aged. Use the WOW disk or down load the AVS 709 and try your hand at calibration. Enjoy your tv people.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheshechic View Post


You must have also read that break in does nothing to prevent IR and that running slides does nothing but age the pixels, which can serve a few real purposes. That's the truth.
The best advice I've read, and used, is to feed the tv a variety of content. If you want to turn the contrast down then do and please, please take it out of Standard- it really is pointless. There is no harm in trying out other people's settings to find what you think looks best, tweak them if you like, but know that it may change after awhile when the pixels are aged. Use the WOW disk or down load the AVS 709 and try your hand at calibration. Enjoy your tv people.

 

Hey, I am in the same boat as the OP. I just bought a new 50" S64 and am looking for advice. I went to the IR prevention sticky, but the information does not seem to be condensed into a main post anywhere (or maybe I missed it). Where are these slides so that I can get a hold of them? For the break in period, I should leave my settings low, correct? And after some break in, I should start trying out some settings (I was going to try the CNET ones first)? Lastly, is there a difference between calibration and settings? Or by calibrating are you just manually trying to configure what settings are best for your specific TV? Thanks a lot for the help. 

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muskiehunter View Post

Hey, I am in the same boat as the OP. I just bought a new 50" S64 and am looking for advice. I went to the IR prevention sticky, but the information does not seem to be condensed into a main post anywhere (or maybe I missed it). Where are these slides so that I can get a hold of them? For the break in period, I should leave my settings low, correct? And after some break in, I should start trying out some settings (I was going to try the CNET ones first)? Lastly, is there a difference between calibration and settings? Or by calibrating are you just manually trying to configure what settings are best for your specific TV? Thanks a lot for the help. 

Calibration is when a professional calibrator comes to your house and calibrates your tv with professional equipment. Dialling in settings simply means copying someone else's custom settings specifically for your tv model only. There is no point for you to do the slides. They are meant to be used with Dnice custom settings only. Dnice has not posted settings for the S60/S64. Although some people do it anyways to age the phosphors evenly. I just don't see the point, you can achieve the same result by putting in Cnet's custom settings and watch full screen content only for the first 100hrs. Avoid 4:3 content.
post #14 of 17
not just professionals, there are plenty of enthusiasts on this forum (and others) that have their own gear (meter, software, patterns etc).. many start down the path of doing their own calibrations and there is a wealth of information on this form and others.

Many of the most successful Professional Calibrators started calibrating their own displays as Enthusiasts.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Latinoheat View Post


Calibration is when a professional calibrator comes to your house and calibrates your tv with professional equipment. Dialling in settings simply means copying someone else's custom settings specifically for your tv model only. There is no point for you to do the slides. They are meant to be used with Dnice custom settings only. Dnice has not posted settings for the S60/S64. Although some people do it anyways to age the phosphors evenly. I just don't see the point, you can achieve the same result by putting in Cnet's custom settings and watch full screen content only for the first 100hrs. Avoid 4:3 content.

 Thanks for the information. A lot of my content is not full screen, so just watching normally and avoiding 4:3 content for 100 hours would be pretty inconvenient. I would rather just break it with the slides and not have to worry about it so much. Thanks for letting me know that Dnice has not published settings for the s60/s64. What about using something like http://www.avsforum.com/t/948496/avs-hd-709-blu-ray-mp4-calibration AVS HD 709?

 

Lastly, I am in the market for a Bluray player. I have read that getting a PS3 and having it do the 3:2 pulldown rather than having my s64 do it can help with some video processing/motion issues. Is this true? And if so, is this unique to the PS3 or are there other Bluray players with similar functionality? I appreciate the help. 

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muskiehunter View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sheshechic View Post

You must have also read that break in does nothing to prevent IR and that running slides does nothing but age the pixels, which can serve a few real purposes. That's the truth.

The best advice I've read, and used, is to feed the tv a variety of content. If you want to turn the contrast down then do and please, please take it out of Standard- it really is pointless. There is no harm in trying out other people's settings to find what you think looks best, tweak them if you like, but know that it may change after awhile when the pixels are aged. Use the WOW disk or down load the AVS 709 and try your hand at calibration. Enjoy your tv people.

Hey, I am in the same boat as the OP. I just bought a new 50" S64 and am looking for advice. I went to the IR prevention sticky, but the information does not seem to be condensed into a main post anywhere (or maybe I missed it). Where are these slides so that I can get a hold of them? For the break in period, I should leave my settings low, correct? And after some break in, I should start trying out some settings (I was going to try the CNET ones first)? Lastly, is there a difference between calibration and settings? Or by calibrating are you just manually trying to configure what settings are best for your specific TV? Thanks a lot for the help. 

There aren't any "break in" slides. D'Nice asks that slides be run before applying his settings. The purpose is to age your set, just as he has aged his, thus giving your results that will be close to the ones he achieved. If you cannot run follow his instructions for aging the panel then don't even bother, just try the settings. Everything you need for this can be found at the link below.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1466472/2013-panasonic-settings-issues-thread

In addition, you can find the settings of others on the thread dedicated to the ST60. Also, settings are the result of a calibration. Just as with mechanics there are levels of every kind. If you pay someone they should be a professional, and they should provide you with before and after data, otherwise you could give it a try by using a disk like Disney WOW.
post #17 of 17
I want to say that the ST60 is more than just an entry level priced plasma. By all accounts on cnet, AVS reviews and from those in the know the VT60 and ZT60 are not that much better (notice I did not say they aren't better) I have 205 hours on my 60ST60 (thanks turbe) and have experienced absolutely zero IR or burn in and have seen no lag either, although I'm not a gamer. All I did was watch as much full screen TV as possible and watch the banners that are on the football games. I have no experience with the Samsung plasma panels but by all accounts a great panel, just more money than the ST60. Just do your homework and good luck picking smile.gif
I wanted to add that the ST60 looks very good in the day time and off angle viewing is excellent.
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