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How to deal with calibration haters and plasma TVs with i1Display Pro?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Sort of 2 unrelated questions:

1. I find that some people simply dislike calibrated settings. A buddy of mine has a nice screen that he keeps really bright, way past 50fL. With calibration, the screen becomes dim, whites turn into proper grays and that turns not just him, but similar type of people of. Explaining that the idea of calibration is not bright cheerful colors, but realistic and accurate image of what the film-maker saw when filming or a game developer saw when developing graphics doesn't seem to change the way they perceive calibrated image. It makes little sense to me because calibrated image creates a deeper 3D effect and increases the immersion and realism factor like in movie theaters, but for whatever reason, some people prefer heavy brightness in dark environments because "gray image just doesn't look right". Is there a better way to demonstrate or explain to those people how calibrated image is in fact better? Are there some kind of examples I can show that specifically show how high brightness crushes details?

2a. I own an i1Display Pro from X-Rite and I am playing with an idea of getting a new TV, possibly a plasma. I have noticed that calibrating plasma TVs is quite difficult, especially without pro-rated colorimeters or even spectrometers that can accurately read black and near-black scale. I often see "Do not trust it for <30% IRE". Is it really that bad? Don't correction files help drastically? Does it even make sense for someone to buy a plasma and calibrate it with i1Display Pro without inviting an ISF-certified calibrator to do a calibration? What are the threads I need to look at for plasma calibration? I know gamma needs special adjustment using low % IRE.What else?

2b. Panasonic makes the bestest plasma TV but now they are going out of business. So far no other manufacturer managed to reach the same black level points as Panasonic. Does that mean that their TVs will soon become rare and will rise in prices?
post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonarchX View Post

Sort of 2 unrelated questions:

1. I find that some people simply dislike calibrated settings. A buddy of mine has a nice screen that he keeps really bright, way past 50fL. With calibration, the screen becomes dim, whites turn into proper grays and that turns not just him, but similar type of people of. Explaining that the idea of calibration is not bright cheerful colors, but realistic and accurate image of what the film-maker saw when filming or a game developer saw when developing graphics doesn't seem to change the way they perceive calibrated image. It makes little sense to me because calibrated image creates a deeper 3D effect and increases the immersion and realism factor like in movie theaters, but for whatever reason, some people prefer heavy brightness in dark environments because "gray image just doesn't look right". Is there a better way to demonstrate or explain to those people how calibrated image is in fact better? Are there some kind of examples I can show that specifically show how high brightness crushes details?........
Some viewers do not regard image fidelity as a worthwhile objective. That is their right to have their own private standards for picture quality. Microsoft and Monster/ISF offer programs that use people in poses as test patterns. The one for white crush and contrast adjustment was a man in a white dress shirt. White clipping made the details such as seams, buttons, collar, etc. disappear.

"Nobody ever went broke underestimating the taste of the American public." H. L. Mencken
post #3 of 7
For the money the i1Display Pro is a very good buy. But remember a good meter is only as good as the software and the DIY or "pro" calibrator that is using it.
Yes that meter should read down to 10%. To find out how reliable your meter is, display a 11% window like you will find in AVSHD 709 disc and take 10 readings in a row of that 10% window (non apl). Now look at the numbers (xy and Y) are they all the same or do they change from reading to reading. also do the same for RGB using 75% or 100%.

I also would suggest getting a I1Pro rev D or 2, to use as a reference meter to profile the I1D pro.
This combo for the money is a big bang for the buck and is going to get you closer to your goal, but still you will have some colors that are always going to be a little off.

Also consider the plasma is about as difficult display to get right as there is, mainly because it shifts/APL.

imo, there is to much importance placed on getting a flat line gamma and therefore using the detailed Gamma adjustments. I would suggest you use your RGB high low settings first for grayscale, gamma and color temp, then use (if your display has detailed 10% to 100% RGB settings) to fine tune your GS, gamma and CT. I would also suggest to not use any of the adjustments for green.
From there you do your Gamut/CMS adjustments.

Probably the best tip I can give is to use a calibration software like CP or CM that will give you step by step instructions, and help you understand what is going on when you change a setting.

ss
post #4 of 7
Ok reality, most people don't really care, unless it is free, then they will be critical that it isn't in some way related to their distorted view of the world.
However many with education of what calibration actually means will somewhat come round to the idea.

I have calibrated a couple of clients where by I left it up to them if they pay me should they ultimately prefer a calibrated display, it can be viewed a risk for me, but I was confident they would actually pay. Although I made a judgement call on their morals aswell. In each case I said, leave it a month and see how you feel then. They have all paid.

Then there are those who are hostile, they will not listen, not even to education. Here the best approach is leave it be, it is not worth the argument.
Ultimately we enjoy the results of our efforts, they enjoy their choice. That is a free world.


The i1Dpro is a good device, mine measures very well relative to my Jeti1211 and i1pro
People ignore display varibility, especially the displays ability to create repeatable low video levels. I'd argue that the i1Dpro is more repeatable at the 1~5% level than many displays. This can lead to many claiming problems making measurements below 10% levels.

Just remember part of the process is assesment of the results, not just relying on the reported data. It's where the pro's and good diy'ers earn their salt.

If you want a Panasonic, get in quick. The writing is on the wall for Plasma in general.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonarchX View Post

Sort of 2 unrelated questions:

1. I find that some people simply dislike calibrated settings.

You know how people don't mind listening to music on a clock radio or mini ipod speakers? Well it's like that!
post #6 of 7
You know how photographic post cards always have brighter than real-life colors? Just like that. If postcards had accurate images of their subjects, sales would plummet by 75%,

You can't force anybody to embrace accurate images so don't even bother.
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by airscapes View Post

You know how people don't mind listening to music on a clock radio or mini ipod speakers? Well it's like that!

My favourite. The mass drive in iPod speaker docks and Bose systems.
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